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Thread: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PLEASE CONTRIBUTE

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    Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PLEASE CONTRIBUTE

    Abbiamo riordinato e controllato tutti i vostri contributi alla lista di termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in Brirtish English e American English.
    Ora la lista è abbastanza estesa, ma ancora migliorabile, quindi inserite pure un messaggio in questo nuovo thread se:
    - Avete altre voci da suggerire (sempre nel formato: Termine italiano - termine AmE - termine BrE)
    - Le voci in elenco sono a vostro parere errate, incomplete, imprecise (dettagliate i vostri commenti in modo da aiutarci a correggere eventualmente la voce in oggetto)

    Grazie per la collaborazione


    We’ve checked and reorganized all of your contributions to the list of British and American English translations from Italian. By now the list is pretty big, but it can still be improved. Feel free to add a new post to this thread if:
    - you have other entries to suggest (keeping to the format Italian term – AmE term – BrE term)
    - you think any of the current entries are incorrect, imprecise or incomplete (couch your comments in a way that will help us correct the entry in question)

    Thanks for giving us a hand with this

    Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English <--- CLICK
    Last edited by Paulfromitaly; 22nd March 2013 at 4:02 PM.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Termine in italiano: portafogli(o)
    Termine in AmE: billfold/wallet
    Termine in BrE: wallet/purse

    Sapevo che "billfold" fosse tipicamente AmE ma non è stato menzionato nella lista.
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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    We would need a BE expert here, but I don't think purse is the same as wallet, at least not in modern usage. A purse is what Americans often call a handbag or pocketbook.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    BrE:for storing money, you have two different items. A wallet is where you can put notes in without having to fold them. It also has slots for putting your cards in. A purse is what you put coins into - there are no special compartments for cards or notes, so you have to fold notes up to put them in.

    A bag a woman carries on their shoulder is not called a purse but a bag, or handbag.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Termine in italiano: portamonete
    Termine in AmE: change purse
    Termine in BrE: purse
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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with cotenna di maiale fritta. The BrE term is shown as pork rinds, but I have never heard this term and have always seen this product sold as pork scratchings.

    An entry containing a typo:

    The entry that starts with patata arrostita con la buccia. The AmE term is shown as backed potato, but this should be baked potato.

    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with silenziatore (di macchina). The BrE term is shown as muffler, but I have never heard this and have only ever seen the device referred to as a silencer.
    Last edited by sound shift; 22nd March 2013 at 5:27 PM.
    It's the short words that get you.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Quote Originally Posted by sound shift View Post
    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with cotenna di maiale fritta. The BrE term is shown as pork rinds, but I have never heard this term and have always seen this product sold as pork scratchings.

    An entry containing a typo:

    The entry that starts with patata arrostita con la buccia. The AmE term is shown as backed potato, but this should be baked potato.
    Fixed, thanks.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with ragazze scout. The BrE term is shown as girl scout, but in my experience these people are called girl guides (often shortened to just guides).
    It's the short words that get you.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Quote Originally Posted by sound shift View Post
    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with ragazze scout. The BrE term is shown as girl scout, but in my experience these people are called girl guides (often shortened to just guides).
    I thought girl scout was American. We definitely talk about girl guides in BE.

    Incorrect entries (in my opinion):
    Camper. This is not a caravan: a caravan is a roulotte, not a camper. In BE I'd say camper, campervan, Dormobile (very old-fashioned!), motorhome....Cotenna di maiale fritta. Soundshift says: "The BrE term is shown as pork rinds, but I have never heard this term and have always seen this product sold as pork scratchings". I agree, but would just like to add that I associate "pork scratchings" with the stuff you buy in a packet in a pub to drink with your beer. Bacon rinds come off fried bacon, however, so I think that's a closer meaning. And "pork crackling" is what comes off your Sunday Roast (or off your "porchetta" in Italy).

    New suggestion:

    Termine in italiano: diverso/a/i/e da
    Termine in AmE: different than
    Termine in BrE: different from

    Excuse the "bold", but for some reason I can't remove it!
    Last edited by london calling; 22nd March 2013 at 6:31 PM.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Quote Originally Posted by sound shift View Post
    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with ragazze scout. The BrE term is shown as girl scout, but in my experience these people are called girl guides (often shortened to just guides).
    Quote Originally Posted by london calling View Post
    I thought girl scout was American. We definitely talk about girl guides in BE.

    Incorrect entries (in my opinion):
    Camper. This is not a caravan: a caravan is a roulotte, not a camper. In BE I'd say camper, campervan, Dormobile (very old-fashioned!), motorhome....Cotenna di maiale fritta. Soundshift says: "The BrE term is shown as pork rinds, but I have never heard this term and have always seen this product sold as pork scratchings". I agree, but would just like to add that I associate "pork scratchings" with the stuff you buy in a packet in a pub to drink with your beer. Bacon rinds come off fried bacon, however, so I think that's a closer meaning. And "pork crackling" is what comes off your Sunday Roast (or off your "porchetta" in Italy).

    New suggestion:

    Termine in italiano: diverso/a/i/e da
    Termine in AmE: different than
    Termine in BrE: different from

    Excuse the "bold", but for some reason I can't remove it!
    Both fixed, thanks

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Italiano:"Gamberetto"-AE: prawn, shrimp; BE: shrimp, prawn. Forse c' è un doppione.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Termine in italiano: frizzante
    Termine in AmE: carbonated
    Termine in BrE: fizzy

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Quote Originally Posted by london calling View Post
    I thought girl scout was American. We definitely talk about girl guides in BE.

    Incorrect entries (in my opinion):
    .Cotenna di maiale fritta. Soundshift says: "The BrE term is shown as pork rinds, but I have never heard this term and have always seen this product sold as pork scratchings". I agree, but would just like to add that I associate "pork scratchings" with the stuff you buy in a packet in a pub to drink with your beer. Bacon rinds come off fried bacon, however, so I think that's a closer meaning. And "pork crackling" is what comes off your Sunday Roast (or off your "porchetta" in Italy).
    I confirm "girl scouts" is AE.

    I think "Pork rinds" is also AE.

    In the South we also have "chitlins". I just learned the word "chitterlings" (so I suppose it's BE?), looking up "chitlins". But I don't like the Italian translation of "trippa di maiale." When I lived in Modena I was introduced to something that looked (and tasted) like "chitlins", but it had a different name (probably in modenese). Does anyone have an alternate term to "trippa di maiale"? (This term brings to mind "trippa in umido", that has nothing to do with "chitlins" - although I suppose both are derived from the intestines - and not the "cotenna").

    Here's something new (inspired by a recent thread):
    Termine in italiano: divertirsi un sacco
    Termine in AmE: have a great time, have a wonderful time
    Termine in BrE: have a brilliant time

    BE speakers often use "brilliant" where AE speakers might say "great, wonderful" ("Brilliant" in AE means "highly intelligent, extremely clever" - example: "brilliant deduction", "Sherlocks Holmes was brilliant").

    Termine in italiano: fantastico
    Termine in AmE: great, wonderful, fantastic
    Termine in BrE: brilliant, fantastic

    Termine in italiano: geniale
    Termine in AmE: brilliant
    Termine in BrE: clever?
    Last edited by curiosone; 23rd March 2013 at 10:54 AM. Reason: addition
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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Quote Originally Posted by longplay View Post
    Italiano:"Gamberetto"-AE: prawn, shrimp; BE: shrimp, prawn. Forse c' è un doppione.
    Italiano: gamberetto
    BE: shrimp

    Italiano: gambero
    BE: prawn


    I don't know if they're the same thing in AE, so I hope the Americans will chip in here, but to me there's a difference between a shrimp and a prawn.

    Curio, regards trippa di maiale, that to me is pork tripe, which I believe is the same in both AE and BE so I won't add it here and I confirm tripe is part of an animal's stomach, not its intestines.

    And regards chitterlings, I confirm it's BE:

    Italiano: intestini di maiale
    AE: chitlins
    BE: chitterlings
    Last edited by london calling; 23rd March 2013 at 9:35 PM.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Quote Originally Posted by london calling View Post
    Italiano: gamberetto
    BE: shrimp

    Italiano: gambero
    BE: prawn


    I don't know if they're the same thing in AE, so I hope the Americans will chip in here, but to me there's a difference between a shrimp and a prawn.
    We know this is a tricky one as there doesn't seem to be general consensus about it

    Gamberi - gamberetti - scampi - gamberoni


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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Quote Originally Posted by london calling View Post
    Italiano: gamberetto
    AE: shrimp
    BE: shrimp

    Italiano: gambero
    A: shrimp
    BE: prawn


    I don't know if they're the same thing in AE, so I hope the Americans will chip in here, but to me there's a difference between a shrimp and a prawn.

    Americans say "shrimp" for all sizes, except for "jumbo shrimp". We don't use the term "prawns" (and "shrimp" is a plural concept, as in "I ate some shrimp.").

    Curio, regards trippa di maiale, that to me is pork tripe, which I believe is the same in both AE and BE so I won't add it here and I confirm tripe is part of an animal's stomach, not its intestines.
    I agree with you; it's just what I found in the WR here: http://www.wordreference.com/enit/chitterlings
    ...and copied it from there.

    And regards chitterlings, I confirm it's BE:

    Italiano: ciccioli (Thanks to Tex for reminding me of this term, which was on the tip of my tongue)
    AE: chitlins
    BE: chitterlings
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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Ciccioli doesn't correspond to chitterlings in BE, so we've got another difference here! Ciccioli (see here) are what we call pork scratchings (see here). These are chitterlings (intestini di maiale).

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    IT: asilo (roughly kids aged 2 to 5)
    BrE = nursery school
    AmE = preschool - kindergarten
    Is this accurate?

    Brevity is the soul of wit - Le persone intelligenti hanno il dono della concisione

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    Quote Originally Posted by Paulfromitaly View Post
    Is this accurate?
    In BE we do talk about Preschool Education, which takes the form of a nursery school or playgroup in the UK: offhand I don't remember any of my friends or relatives in the UK saying their kids went to preschool, however (my little horror went to an asilo, of course!). I'd say preschool was AE, but let's see what they say on the other side of the pond.

    As regards kindergarten, I've just had a look at what Wiki has to say (here), I quote:

    In the United States and anglophone Canada, as well as in parts of Australia, such as New South Wales, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory, kindergarten is the word often restricted in use to describe the first year of education in a primary or elementary school

    Now, I know that's correct as regards Australia, because I went to kindergarten, there, but I don't know about the States or Canada.

    PS. I've just noticed that the link also confirms what I said about nursery school and playgroup above.

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    Re: Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PARTE SECONDA

    I think we've had several threads on this and we seem to go around and around (same as the discussion of laurea!) - anyway, the definition given in post #19 for kindergarten also applies here in the States
    kindergarten is the word often restricted in use to describe the first year of education in a primary or elementary school
    In most places, children have to be 5 to enter kindergarten (or have their fifth birthday by a certain date in the fall.)
    Pre-school usually includes one or two years before kindergarten, meaning three- and four-year-olds.
    The "classes" for the babies (from whatever starting age they accept up to three years) are referred to as "nursery school" or "day care."
    The complication may come because many private centers include classes for all these levels, so you may have a Kindergartener attending classes at a "Preschool." Public schools (at least in New Jersey) also offer preschool classes, which may or may not be in a separate building from the other grades. In the district where I worked there were two large preschools, enrolling about 1200 children in total (ages 3 and 4).

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