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Thread: To call

  1. #1
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    To call

    How do you translate 'to call [someone by shouting (out)]" in yourlanguage? (E.g. I called him because I wanted to speak to him)

    And what words can you deduce from that same root? What derivations do you have? Think of English: a phone call, a calling(voc-ation), to call upon someone,... But I only want derivations based on your call-root, not translations of the latter words.

    Dutch:

    - Beroep, profession/ work (not just job – it refers to the contents)
    - roeping, vocation
    - oproep, phone call (but only when someone called you,not when you call him)
    - mensen oproepen om ..., to call upon people to ...
    Last edited by ThomasK; 22nd June 2013 at 6:06 AM.

  2. #2
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    Re: To call

    Hebrew:
    לקרוא - likro, which is also used for to read.
    All the seats are taken in the parliament of fools!

  3. #3
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    Re: To call

    Is it really? But can you use likro to refer to calling on the phone, to being called, etc. ?
    Last edited by ThomasK; 23rd June 2013 at 7:35 AM.

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    Re: To call

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    Is it really? But can you use likro to refer to calling on the phone, to being called, etc. ?
    Not really, but is acceptable; i on first thought wanted to write it but then i thought it cant be.
    If you follow the strict use of words in hebrew then no, but less strict use would allow it in the past tense with explicitly stating on the phone.
    Another thing would be to tell someone "youre called on the phone (someones waiting on the line)".
    All the seats are taken in the parliament of fools!

  5. #5
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    Re: To call

    In Greek:

    To call: «Καλώ» [ka'lo] < Classical v. «καλέω/καλῶ» kăléō (uncontracted) / kalô (contracted) (Aeolic «κάλημι» kắlēmĭ, Arcadocypriot «καλήζω» kălḗzô) --> to call, call by name, summon (PIE *klh₁-, to call, shout cf Hitt. kališš, to call, summon; Skt. उषःकल (usah-kala), rooster (lit. 'he who cries at dawn'); Lat. calāre, to call, call out, announce).
    Derivatives:

    «Κλήση» ['klisi] (fem. noun) --> call (noun), phone call, calling, vocation, traffic ticket, paging < Classical third declension fem. noun «κλῆσις» klêsis --> calling, call
    «Κλήτευση ['klitefsi] (fem. noun) --> judicial summons < Classical third declension fem. noun «κλήτευσις» klḗteusis --> judicial/administrative summons
    «Κλητήρας» [kli'tiras] (masc. & fem. noun) --> Public officer responsible for the serving of legal summonses < Classical third declension masc. & fem. noun «κλητήρ» klētḗr --> summoner

    From the v. «καλέω/καλῶ»:

    «Ανακαλώ» [anaka'lo] --> to recall
    «Προσκαλώ» [proska'lo] -->to invite, summon
    «Προκαλώ» [proka'lo] --> to provoke, challenge
    «Κατακαλέω/κατακαλῶ» kătăkăléō (uncontracted) / kătăkalô (contracted) --> to invoke (it has not survived in the modern language); a famous Byzantine general (probably of Armenian stock) who lived in the second half of 11th c. CE was named after two participles: «Κατακαλῶν Κεκαυμένος» Katakalôn (Present tense active voice participle of v. «κατακαλῶ») Kekauménos (Perfect tense medio-passive voice participle of v. «καίω» kǽō, to light, burn); thus, his name is literally translated into English as
    The burnt invoker
    Les Grecs sont étonnants dans l'adversité - François Pouqueville

  6. #6
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    Re: To call

    Czech:

    volati = to call;

    prefixed perfective verbs:
    povolati = to call up > povolání (= profession/occupation/job, der Beruf), adj. povolávací (= call-up), e.g. povolávací rozkaz (call-up papers, draft notice);
    předvolati = to call sb to the stand, to summon;
    svolati = to summon e.g. Parliament;
    zavolati = to make a (phone) call, to ring (up), to phone;
    vyvolati = to cause/induce e.g. a stir, quarrel, uproar, chaos, fears, ...; to evoke, to provoke; vyvolati film (= to develop a film); vyvolati žáka k tabuli (= einen Schüler im Unterricht aufrufen, an die Tafel rufen, to call a pupil to the blackboard);
    obvolati = to call round, to ring round;
    dovolati se = to get/obtain/achieve (e.g. justice); to reach sb on the phone;
    odvolati = to call off, to recant;
    odvolati se = to appeal;

    derived verbal nouns: volání (= calling, a phone-call), povolání (= profession, Beruf), předvolání (notice to appear), svolání, vyvolání, obvolání, odvolání (= appeal, Berufung), ...; povolávání, předvolávání, obvolávání, ...;
    derived nouns: vyvolávač (= barker, a person who loudly addresses passers-by to attract customers), svolatel (= who summons), ...;

    noun volavka (= volavý pták) = decoy (bird), volavka is also a woman used by police as a decoy;
    Last edited by bibax; 23rd June 2013 at 4:54 PM.

  7. #7
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    Re: To call

    Thanks for these impressive lists. I had expected quite some words, but not that many. This shows the importance of prefixes again in our languages. Amazing in fact. I am wondering if our Philipino, Chinese, ... friend will come up with similar things - but I suppose their languages work quite differently...

  8. #8
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    Re: To call

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    How do you translate 'to call [someone by shouting (out)]" in yourlanguage? (E.g. I called him because I wanted to speak to him)
    «Звать». «Я позвал его, мне надо было с ним поговорить». The same is for naming. That's it – no more meanings. No phones, seldom any memories. There is a list of perfective verbs that correspond to «звать», but they make only minor additions to the two meanings that it has ('to call by voice' and 'to name').
    Last edited by Ёж!; 23rd June 2013 at 5:45 PM.

  9. #9
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    Re: To call

    Turkish:
    çağır

    Here is the Proto-Turkic word that is probably related.
    http://starling.rinet.ru/cgi-bin/res...roto&ic_any=on

    çar is the same thing as tsar.
    Last edited by ancalimon; 23rd June 2013 at 6:31 PM.

  10. #10
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    Re: To call

    Caqyr- (also to invite), ata- (to name).

  11. #11
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    Re: To call

    I am sorry, butcould you transcribe [and translate] the Russian, E? I can decipher in part,but not sufficiently to be sure. The root is not the same as in Czech, or is it?

    @ et targyn: isthat Russian as well? It is not a transciption of E's, is it?

    @ancalimon: are you referring to the Russian word 'tsar'? What is the link then?
    Last edited by ThomasK; 23rd June 2013 at 8:21 PM.

  12. #12
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    Re: To call

    Quote Originally Posted by er targyn View Post
    Caqyr- (also to invite), ata- (to name).
    ata- means to elect, to assign in Turkish.
    "ad vermek" (to give name) means "to name"
    ada- means "devote".

  13. #13
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    Re: To call

    ThomasK, I gave Kazakh forms, because the Russian ones were already given.

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    Re: To call

    I am sorry, et Targyn, I had not noticed, please forgive me. But is 'ata' also some form of shouting? I suppose not...

  15. #15
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    Re: To call

    No, ata- is a denominal verb from at "name". In Turkish "name" is ad.
    Just to add: at means in most Turkic languages also "horse", and ata - "(grand)father".
    Last edited by er targyn; 23rd June 2013 at 8:44 PM.

  16. #16
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    Re: To call

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    @ancalimon: are you referring to the Russian word 'tsar'? What is the link then?
    I guess we would need the true etymology of tsar first to see the link. But that's another subject. Something interrelated with Turkic dialects and history of those people which unfortunately is mostly unknown.

    When we look at the Starling link I gave;

    "yardım" in Turkish means "help", "call for help"
    "yargıç" in Turkish means judge.

    So all in all, there seems to be a relationship between calling and being a ruler... and "yar" and "çar".
    Last edited by ancalimon; 23rd June 2013 at 9:08 PM.

  17. #17
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    Re: To call

    Tsar' is from Latin Caesar, it's a fact.

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    Re: To call

    Finnish:

    kutsua = call, invite

    Derivations:
    (1) kutsu = invitation; a call (by shouting); also: hätäkutsu 'an emergency call, a distress signal'
    (2) pl. kutsut = a party, an invitation (social gathering)
    (3) kutsumus = vocation, calling, eg. kutsumus papin tehtävään '~ to working as a priest'
    (4) pl. kutsunnat = call-up (for military service)
    (5) kutsuva = inviting, luring
    That which caterpillars call the end of the world, we call the butterfly. Sitä, mitä toukka kutsuu maailmanlopuksi, me kutsumme perhoseksi.

  19. #19
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    Re: To call

    Quote Originally Posted by er targyn View Post
    Tsar' is from Latin Caesar, it's a fact.
    That seems quite plausible, and I find it confirmed at etymonline.org. I would love to believe Ancalimon's explanation though because it is attractive and not implausible as such - but I have suffered from wishful thinking before ;-(.

  20. #20
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    Re: To call

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    The root is not the same as in Czech, or is it?
    No it is not. The root is 'zov', but the verb omits the 'o'. By the way, the verb can mean 'to invite' as well, though no derivation from it makes a noun meaning 'invitation'; for invitations, we have the verb «приглашать» and the noun «приглашение», both of which have the root 'glas', meaning 'voice'.

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