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Thread: Grammatical terminology

  1. #1
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    Grammatical terminology

    Hi all,

    I have been working on a glossary of some basic grammatical terms in various languages. So far, I have +/- 42 terms related to grammar (and writing) in +/- 47 languages.
    Most languages are done, some have still a few gaps, and a handful of other languages present too many problems. I hardly find information for the Hebrew, Belarussian, Tamil terms.

    After some weeks of working on the list, I reached the point that I need some help. Otherwise said: I am stuck.

    And therefore I would like to ask (beg :-) for help from the listmembers, to ask whether people could read through the series of terms in their language(s), and if necessary, ad a term or correct a term.

    Basically, what I need are
    - the terms in the singular form (hence not articles, but article),
    - the terms should start with a small letter (hence not Articles, but article). [Needless to say that this doesn't apply to neither German nouns nor Chinese, Arabic, Hindi, etc. words :-)];
    - the terms in the 'native' script (I mean, no transliterations or transcriptions). If there is more than one possiblility -- e.g. language x written with two scripts -- I'd be grateful with both of them :-).
    - Some languages have several possibilities for one term. I'd be happy with the most commonly used one.

    There are some problems I am aware of:
    - The series of terms in Pashto poses some problems because I cannot find a way to correctly use some special letters (as س with a dot under and above it);
    - I do realise that not all languages have the same grammatical categories. If I am not wrong, Arabic has several categories (and terms) for what we simply call 'adjective'. Nevertheless, the starting point should be the English term. A simple example: the Arabic script doesn't have capital letters, yet Arabic DOES have a term for capital letter when discussing the Latin script.

    Depending on the reactions, I'll try to frequently update the list on this board or forward it for people who are interested.

    Any help will be highly appreciated.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
    Last edited by Frank06; 19th September 2006 at 2:55 PM.

  2. #2
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Hi Frank,

    It is common to post files directly in the Glossaries forum, not in Glossaries discussions (just a subforum for technical issues). I am moving it.

    Jana
    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep. Saul Bellow

  3. #3
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Hello Frank,

    I compiled a list of grammatical terms in Belarusian for you. You will find it attached as a doc. file because my Excel refuses to recognize Cyrillic characters.
    Attached Files Attached Files


  4. #4
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Great job! However I'd like to point out a few corrections to the Finnish language terms:

    interrogative sentence = kysymyslause
    capital: Neither I or my dictionary knows 'suuraakkonen'. I think 'iso kirjain' would be better.
    definite = määräinen artikkeli
    conjugated verb = taivutettu verbi
    question word: To my mind the term 'interrogatiivipronomini' is limited only certain kind of question words. Therefore 'kysymyssana' would be a wider term.

  5. #5
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Here are some observations for the Romanian language:

    interrogative sentence - propoziţie interogativă
    conjugated verb - verb conjugat

    present-(timpul) prezent
    past-(timpul) trecut
    viitor-(timpul) viitor
    Using "timpul" is just as saying in English "Present tense", "Past tense", etc.

  6. #6
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    It's the same as the excel of Frank06 with corrections and additions about the Greek terminology
    Last edited by ireney; 7th September 2006 at 1:01 PM.
    “I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours.” ~ Jerome K. Jerome

  7. #7
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Hi,

    First of all, thanks to everybody who replied so far!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by DrWatson View Post
    question word: To my mind the term 'interrogatiivipronomini' is limited only certain kind of question words. Therefore 'kysymyssana' would be a wider term.
    :-)
    I'm aware of the problem... Question words (or at least Dutch 'vraagwoord') is not the same as an interrogative pronoun. For the time being, I'll leave it like that :-).

    Thanks again.

    Frank

  8. #8
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    What I did in for Greek under the collumn "question word" was put every kind of question word existing (pronoun, adverb,preposition). In fact, since I had made one mistake there, here's the updated version.
    Last edited by ireney; 11th December 2006 at 10:47 PM.
    “I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours.” ~ Jerome K. Jerome

  9. #9
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Quote Originally Posted by parakseno View Post
    Here are some observations for the Romanian language:
    conjugated verb - verb conjugat
    I`d rather say "verb de conjugat" as it is used in school and in the specialised terminology

  10. #10
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Italian terminology.
    Interrogative sentence: frase interrogativa (or proposizione interrogativa)
    Aux: verbo ausiliare (not *ausiliaro)
    Conjugated verb: verbo coniugato (or verbo flesso)
    Demonstrative pronoun: pronome dimostrativo (not *dimontrativo)
    Question word: it's not exactly pronome interrogativo (interrogative pronoun). Traditional Italian grammar has not a unique term, we have to say pronome interrogativo, avverbio interrogativo or congiunzione interrogativa. Linguists may also say elemento interrogativo, parola interrogativa, parola wh and the likes.

  11. #11
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    I've corrected some of the German translations and added alternatives (those mentioned after a slash). You sometimes confused the plural and singular, the rest was superb.
    Last edited by Whodunit; 6th October 2006 at 6:24 PM.
    Wer keine großen Dinge vollbringen kann, tue kleine in großem Maße. — Free translation of Napoleon Hill's citation —

  12. #12
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Hi,

    Again, thank you thank you everybody for your kind help! I knew this was the place to ask...

    Quote Originally Posted by Whodunit View Post
    I've corrected some of the German translations and added alternatives (those mentioned after a slash). You sometimes confused the plural and singular, the rest was superb.
    Thanks for pointing out the mistakes and for posting the alternatives :-).

    I'd love to hear your opinions on the next German terms:
    Zeitwort (Verb), Eigenschaftswort (Adjektiv), Geslechtswort (Artikel), Umstandswort (Adverb), etc.
    I found these and more in a rather recent German grammar book written in Chinese, but are the terms fairly new ones (coined for secundary schools), or obselete ones?

    Groetjes,

    Frank

  13. #13
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank06 View Post
    Thanks for pointing out the mistakes and for posting the alternatives :-).
    My pleasure.

    I'd love to hear your opinions on the next German terms:
    Zeitwort (Verb), Eigenschaftswort (Adjektiv), Geschlechtswort (Artikel), Umstandswort (Adverb), etc.
    I found these and more in a rather recent German grammar book written in Chinese, but are the terms fairly new ones (coined for secundary schools), or obselete ones?
    I have never heard Geschlechtswort before. The other German words are just simplications of their Latin counterparts. I wouldn't use Zeitwort etc. with German High School students; they are reserved for those who don't know much about grammar.

    Personally, I would stick to the Latin equivalents.
    Wer keine großen Dinge vollbringen kann, tue kleine in großem Maße. — Free translation of Napoleon Hill's citation —

  14. #14
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    A few corrections and suggestions for the Spanish one:

  15. #15
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    I forgot one: No Spanish grammar ever says "participio pasado", but "participio".
    (corrections and suggestions in red)
    Last edited by lazarus1907; 24th June 2007 at 2:50 PM.

  16. #16
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Just had my first look at Grammaticale termen.xls Wow!
    Suggestions:
    Native American languages
    Transcriptions of terms in IPA
    Got a few years?

  17. #17
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    question: I have made some changes in the Greek terminology . In the last two posts these changes are absent. Why?
    “I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours.” ~ Jerome K. Jerome

  18. #18
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Quote Originally Posted by lazarus1907 View Post
    I forgot one: No Spanish grammar ever says "participio pasado", but "participio".
    (corrections and suggestions in red)
    Lazarus, you took the wrong spreadsheet. You have to use mine (because I was the last one who had posted before you) and change or correct anything you don't like there.

    Ireney, I took yours, so it's been Lazarus' fault.
    Wer keine großen Dinge vollbringen kann, tue kleine in großem Maße. — Free translation of Napoleon Hill's citation —

  19. #19
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Quote Originally Posted by Whodunit View Post
    Lazarus, you took the wrong spreadsheet. You have to use mine (because I was the last one who had posted before you) and change or correct anything you don't like there.

    Ireney, I took yours, so it's been Lazarus' fault.
    I can't believe you want me to do the whole thing again!

    We'll talk about money later.
    Last edited by lazarus1907; 24th June 2007 at 2:50 PM.

  20. #20
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    Re: Grammatical terminology

    Hi all,

    Once again I want to express my thanks to all the people who had a look at the list and who helped me with corrections, comments, suggestions and with pats on the back :-).

    To evade problems, I'll include an up to date list.

    Groetjes,

    Frank
    Last edited by Frank06; 23rd October 2007 at 2:41 AM.

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