Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Native language
    English (AE)
    Posts
    7,932

    possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    I have seen this sentence and was told by an Italian friend that it is perfectly correct:

    Io saluto la vostra nipote
    and now I am totally confused! I had understood that, in the case of a close relative such as "nipote" the article "la" would be omitted except for when:

    1) "nipote" were modified: la vostra nipote canadese
    2) "nipote" was in the plural form
    3) "nipote" was preceded by the possessive adjective "loro"

    Obviously I got the rule wrong. Your comments would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Native language
    Italy -- Italian
    Posts
    138

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    The rule is right, so: Saluto vostra nipote

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    CA
    Native language
    United States
    Posts
    1,161

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Isn't there another exception to why one can omit the definate article before the possesive adjectives besides family members? I've seen it before.
    No URLs in signatures. Please read the rules.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Native language
    English (AE)
    Posts
    7,932

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    And yet Garzanti Linguistica has the following examples under "nipote:"

    mio nipote; la nostra nipote.

    I thought that it should have been "nostra nipote," whereas le nostre nipoti would have been correct. I am confused!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Boston
    Native language
    America, English
    Posts
    286

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Like all students, I sweated over this rule. And amidst all the chaos, I had the hardest time figuring out whether it's la mia famiglia or mia famiglia. Turns out it's the former. The way to remember is that your family consists of many members (plural). Just wanted to throw that out there.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Native language
    Italy, italian
    Posts
    1,131

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    I can give you some more examples to fix the rule:

    - Mio fratello va a scuola.
    - Mia sorella va a scuola.
    - Mio padre va a lavoro.
    - Mia madre va a lavoro.
    - Il mio papà va a lavoro.
    - La mia mamma va lavoro.
    - La mia famiglia è composta da 5 persone.
    - Mio nipote è maschio.
    - Mia nipote è femmina.
    - Manda i miei saluti a vostra nipote.
    - Manda i miei saluti ai vostri nipoti.
    - Mio nipote canadese va all'università.
    - Mia nipote canadese andava all'università.
    - Dai questo libro a sua sorella.
    - Dai questo libro alla (a+la) sorella (ma non alla sua sorella).

    Ciao

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Boston
    Native language
    America, English
    Posts
    286

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Whoa "Il mio papà" and "La mia mamma" are definitely wrong, if I may say so.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Native language
    Italy, italian
    Posts
    1,131

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    I'm sorry,
    but you're not right.
    I wrote that without thinking too much but I wasn't wrong.

    Have a look at:
    http://www.aetnanet.org/catania-scuo...izie-6467.html

    Briefly, it says that:
    "La mia mamma", "Il mio papà" is 100% OK
    "Mia mamma", "Mio papà" is acceptable but not 100% (according to italian grammar rules)

    The source, in this case, is Treccani, a very authoritative one.
    Ciao

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    Italian
    Posts
    16

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Quote Originally Posted by angelico76 View Post
    I can give you some more examples to fix the rule:

    - Mio fratello va a scuola.
    - Mia sorella va a scuola.
    - Mio padre va a lavoro. Mio padre va al lavoro
    - Mia madre va a lavoro. Mia madre va al lavoro
    - Il mio papà va a lavoro. Il mio papa' va al lavoro
    - La mia mamma va lavoro. Mia mamma va al lavoro
    - La mia famiglia è composta da 5 persone. .... di 5 persone
    - Mio nipote è maschio.
    - Mia nipote è femmina.
    - Manda i miei saluti a vostra nipote. Mandate i miei saluti a vostra nipote
    Oppure: Manda i miei saluti a tua nipote
    - Manda i miei saluti ai vostri nipoti. Mandate i miei saluti ai vostri nipoti
    Oppure: Manda i miei saluti ai tuoi nipoti
    - Mio nipote canadese va all'università.
    - Mia nipote canadese andava all'università.
    - Dai questo libro a sua sorella. Da questo libro a sua sorella
    - Dai questo libro alla (a+la) sorella (ma non alla sua sorella). Normalmente quando di usa "alla sorella" si dovrebbe aggiungere di chi e' la sorella... Per esempio "alla sorella di Luigi"
    Imperativo di dare: "da" singolare "date" plurale "dalle" da a lei "dagli" da a lui "da loro" da a loro "dacci" da a noi "dammi" da a me "datti" da a te, etc.
    I verbi italiani possono confondere molto.
    Ciao

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    Italian
    Posts
    16

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Quote Originally Posted by k_georgiadis View Post
    I have seen this sentence and was told by an Italian friend that it is perfectly correct: It is perfectly correct, but the article in this case is not necessary. For example: Mia nipote viene domani.
    Mio nipote Canadese arriva questa sera. The masculine or feminine already determines "la" or "lo"
    There are cases when when we have to describe which, for exaple, "la mia nipote piu' piccola." "my youngest niece" or "il mio nipotino preferito" "my favorite grandchild."


    and now I am totally confused! I had understood that, in the case of a close relative such as "nipote" the article "la" would be omitted except for when:

    1) "nipote" were modified: la vostra nipote canadese "la" here can be omitted or can be used. Note that nipote can be masculine or feminine what changes is the possessive or the article, which will denote F or M.
    Mio nipote, Mia nipote, I miei nipoti, Le mie nipoti ( as you can see the article is not necessary at the singular, but it must be used at the plural to denote the gender."
    2) "nipote" was in the plural form
    3) "nipote" was preceded by the possessive adjective "loro"

    Obviously I got the rule wrong. Your comments would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    Italian
    Posts
    16

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Quote Originally Posted by angelico76 View Post
    I'm sorry,
    but you're not right.
    I wrote that without thinking too much but I wasn't wrong.



    Briefly, it says that:
    "La mia mamma", "Il mio papà" is 100% OK
    "Mia mamma", "Mio papà" is acceptable but not 100% (according to italian grammar rules)

    The source, in this case, is Treccani, a very authoritative one.
    Ciao
    You are not at all wrong, but this is older Italian usage, in modern Italian the article can be omitted in some cases. The best way is to consult a very good grammar book, in use today in Italian schools. By the way "mia mamma" correct when instead "mio papa" is not, you should use "il mio papa" however you can say "mio padre"
    More archaic forms of the language would use the determinative article, and it is not incorrect at all to use it, just not in use much anymore, and does not sound well either.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Boston
    Native language
    America, English
    Posts
    286

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Bingo. LA mia madre and IL mio padre just don't sound good. Grammar books, schmammar books. Some books are saying that you don't have to say lo zucchero, that il zucchero is OK, too. YUCK! So you know, maybe I'm an iconoclast, but I don't necessarily agree with books all the time.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NJ, USA
    Native language
    English (AE)
    Posts
    7,932

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Lots to read here which I'll do on tonight's long flight. Thank you all.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Native language
    Italy, italian
    Posts
    1,131

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Hi,
    well myoho is right:

    - Manda i miei saluti a vostra nipote. Mandate i miei saluti a vostra nipote
    Oppure: Manda i miei saluti a tua nipote
    - Manda i miei saluti ai vostri nipoti. Mandate i miei saluti ai vostri nipoti
    Oppure: Manda i miei saluti ai tuoi nipoti
    or:
    - Mandi i miei saluti a sua nipote
    - Mandi i miei saluti ai suoi nipoti
    - Mando i miei saluti a sua/vostra nipote
    - Mando i miei saluti ai suoi/vostri nipoti
    - (Luigi) Manda i suoi saluti a vostra nipote
    - (Luigi) Manda i suoi saluti ai vostri nipoti

    "manda i miei saluti a vostra nipote" non è molto corretto.

    Invece,
    "Dai questo libro a sua sorella" è corretto. Ad esempio, si stava parlando di qualcuno che non è riportato esplicitamente nella frase, e dico:
    "Senti Luigi, ti ricordi Francesco? Per favore, dai questo libro a sua sorella".

    Altrimenti, dovrei scrivere:
    (Egli) dà questo libro a sua sorella, e non (Egli) da questo libro a sua sorella (la differenza è l'accento). Questo, tra l'altro, è un errore abbastanza frequente ed anche piuttosto importante (onde non confondere con la preposizione da).
    Esiste poi anche la versione da':
    Da' questo libro a sua sorella. In questo caso non si tratta di accento ma di apostrofo (apocope o troncamento), e trattasi di forma monosillabica dell'imperativo Dai.

    Spero di essere stato chiaro,
    Ciao


    Ciao


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    Italian
    Posts
    16

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Quote Originally Posted by Never Got a Dinner View Post
    Bingo. LA mia madre and IL mio padre just don't sound good. Grammar books, schmammar books. Some books are saying that you don't have to say lo zucchero, that il zucchero is OK, too. YUCK! So you know, maybe I'm an iconoclast, but I don't necessarily agree with books all the time.
    Il zucchero is the correct way, but lo zucchero sound sooooo much better,
    I guess you can use it and call it poetic license

    La mia madre
    Il mio padre
    They may be correct, but that means that my teacher in school agreed with me, they sound really bad. I come from the north of Italy, and I don't recall it being common, however in Southern Italy they are used. Italian language has evolved many times since Dante Alighieri. For example: spengere is the correct way, but spegnere is more in use, unless one lives in Tuscany. I am from Emilia Romagna, close to Tuscany, but not the heart of true Italian

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    Italian
    Posts
    16

    Re: possessive adjective before nouns denoting family members

    Quote Originally Posted by angelico76 View Post
    Hi,
    well myoho is right:

    - Manda i miei saluti a vostra nipote. Mandate i miei saluti a vostra nipote
    Oppure: Manda i miei saluti a tua nipote
    - Manda i miei saluti ai vostri nipoti. Mandate i miei saluti ai vostri nipoti
    Oppure: Manda i miei saluti ai tuoi nipoti
    or:
    - Mandi i miei saluti a sua nipote
    - Mandi i miei saluti ai suoi nipoti
    - Mando i miei saluti a sua/vostra nipote
    - Mando i miei saluti ai suoi/vostri nipoti
    - (Luigi) Manda i suoi saluti a vostra nipote
    - (Luigi) Manda i suoi saluti ai vostri nipoti

    "manda i miei saluti a vostra nipote" non è molto corretto.

    Invece,
    "Dai questo libro a sua sorella" è corretto. Ad esempio, si stava parlando di qualcuno che non è riportato esplicitamente nella frase, e dico:
    "Senti Luigi, ti ricordi Francesco? Per favore, dai questo libro a sua sorella".

    Altrimenti, dovrei scrivere:
    (Egli) dà questo libro a sua sorella, e non (Egli) da questo libro a sua sorella (la differenza è l'accento). Questo, tra l'altro, è un errore abbastanza frequente ed anche piuttosto importante (onde non confondere con la preposizione da).
    Esiste poi anche la versione da':
    Da' questo libro a sua sorella. In questo caso non si tratta di accento ma di apostrofo (apocope o troncamento), e trattasi di forma monosillabica dell'imperativo Dai.

    Spero di essere stato chiaro,
    Ciao


    Ciao

    Grazie Angelico, dopo quasi 20 anni negli USA avevo dimenticato che Da' non e' altro che la forma contratta di dai, dimenticando di metter l'apostrofo. Grazie a tutti per questa opportunita'. Accipicchia, devo imparare come inserire le vocali con accento.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    Farsi and English
    Posts
    90

    possesive used with family members

    Hi, i have one question that somebody can clarify. so for words without family members you would use the article, eg. i mei libri or il suo cappotto. But with family members in the singular you would drop the article and say mio padre or suo cugino. Does this apply for family members in the plural too? Grazie mille!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Native language
    Italian, Italy
    Posts
    3,608

    Re: possesive used with family members

    Shab bekheyr, Imaginedarius!

    No, it doesn't: we say i miei cugini, i miei fratelli, le mie sorelle... Onlu in the singular we (have to) drop the article.
    Please correct my mistakes - Korrigiert bitte meine Fehler - Your corrections are welcome

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Italy and the Caribbeans
    Native language
    Italian
    Posts
    351

    Re: possesive used with family members

    But there is another exeption with the possessive "loro" (3 plural person) where you always need the article. Example:
    la loro mamma, la loro sorella, il loro fratello
    le loro mamme, le loro sorelle, i loro fratelli

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Venezia
    Native language
    Italian - Italy
    Age
    42
    Posts
    793

    Re: possesive used with family members

    Hi
    I would never say "La mia madre" or "Il mio padre" but it does not sound so strange to me "La mia mamma" or "Il mio babbo".

    I really don't know if there is a mistake or it is a dialect form... when the "severe" terms padre/madre are substituted by the familiar mamma/babbo/papà...

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •