Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 63

Thread: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Colorado
    Native language
    English-US
    Age
    54
    Posts
    26,550

    Re: comparatives

    "You drink more beer than me" is common, Mister Marcos. However, it's not the standard English taught in school. "You drink more beer than I do" is a better way to say it, especially for people who are trying to speak good English.
    ...It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. W. Shakespeare

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    London
    Native language
    English - South-East England
    Posts
    14,213

    Re: comparatives

    'You drink more beer than me' is correct and good English. Only a minority of people say 'than I', and to the rest of us it sounds stilted and old-fashioned. Teachers used to try to get people to say 'than I', for no good grammatical reason. I would recommend you say 'than me', and avoid 'than I'. You will sound a lot more natural.

    This is different from 'than I do', which is also correct - here 'I' is subject of a verb, not object of a preposition, so 'me' is not possible.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    montréal
    Native language
    english - canada
    Posts
    4

    Re: You drink more beer than me/I.

    It may or may not be accurate to say that many people would use the "you drink more beer than me" line. However, your question was "is it correct ?".
    In order to be grammatically correct you should use "I" which is the subject of the unwritten but implied verb "do".
    Rules matter....

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Native language
    USA, English
    Posts
    8,656

    Re: comparatives

    Quote Originally Posted by entangledbank View Post
    'You drink more beer than me' is correct and good English. Only a minority of people say 'than I', and to the rest of us it sounds stilted and old-fashioned. Teachers used to try to get people to say 'than I', for no good grammatical reason. I would recommend you say 'than me', and avoid 'than I'. You will sound a lot more natural.

    This is different from 'than I do', which is also correct - here 'I' is subject of a verb, not object of a preposition, so 'me' is not possible.
    So when I answer the phone and the caller asks to speak with Packard, do I say, "This is he." or "That's me." ?

    I think it is "This is he". And I think "You drink more beer than I."
    Abutebaris modo subjunctivo denuo.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Native language
    USA English
    Age
    75
    Posts
    22,665

    Re: You drink more beer than me/I.

    English is not always logical ... and often far from it.

    If you can't say "You can drink me" (implying you're some sort of liquid) then you shouldn't be able to say "you can drink more beer than me."

    It's a losing battle in AE, however.
    "My aim is to put down on paper what I see and what I feel in the best and simplest way." - Ernest Hemingway

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Rio Grande do Sul
    Native language
    Portuguese(BR)- English(US) bilingual
    Posts
    113

    Re: comparatives

    Quote Originally Posted by Packard View Post
    So when I answer the phone and the caller asks to speak with Packard, do I say, "This is he." or "That's me." ?

    I think it is "This is he". And I think "You drink more beer than I."
    Allow me to chime in,

    I'd say: It's me or that's me. But can't tell you why

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Oregon, USA
    Native language
    USA English
    Age
    75
    Posts
    22,665

    Re: comparatives

    Quote Originally Posted by brunaa View Post
    I'd say: It's me or that's me. But can't tell you why
    You might and many do .... but don't write it on any formal test of your English ability.
    "My aim is to put down on paper what I see and what I feel in the best and simplest way." - Ernest Hemingway

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Rio Grande do Sul
    Native language
    Portuguese(BR)- English(US) bilingual
    Posts
    113

    Re: You drink more beer than me/I.

    Sure I won't sdgraham! Thanks

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Singapore
    Native language
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Age
    52
    Posts
    11,922

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    Mod note:
    The thread started by Mister marcos69 (post 20) has been merged with an earlier thread on the same issue.

    Nat
    Connection is all.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County CA
    Native language
    English (UK then US)
    Age
    64
    Posts
    12,363

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    [With the merged thread this recapitulates an earlier entry, but I'll leave it anyway] More and more people consider than as a preposition and use object pronouns after it. (see the WRF dictionary usage note under "than"). If I use subject pronouns, I include the verb. He is taller than I am. He is taller than me.

    When I show people my old school class photos, I point to someone very young-looking and say "That's me when I was seven". Does anyone say "That's I when I was seven"? That sounds as weird to me as "He is taller than I" sounds hypercorrect, or at least old-fashioned Shades of gray (grey?) as language usage evolves?
    Your meaning is not what you think it is, it is what your listener thinks it is

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    UK
    Native language
    English - England
    Posts
    24,395

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    Did you read the previous posts?

    If you are writing it as part of a test/exam or speaking formally, write/say I, if you are writing informally or saying it, me is more common.
    "There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn't."

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County CA
    Native language
    English (UK then US)
    Age
    64
    Posts
    12,363

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    Just for completeness.

    You will not be incorrect if you use I and include an appropriate verb.
    He drinks more beer than I do.
    Your meaning is not what you think it is, it is what your listener thinks it is

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    UK
    Native language
    English - England
    Posts
    24,395

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    Quote Originally Posted by entangledbank View Post
    'You drink more beer than me' is correct and good English. Only a minority of people say 'than I', … This is different from 'than I do', which is also correct - here 'I' is subject of a verb, not object of a preposition, so 'me' is not possible.
    So it is without difficulty that we can difference between:
    “I drank more beer than you.”
    And
    “I drank more beer than two pints.”
    Quote Originally Posted by JulianStuart View Post
    More and more people consider than as a preposition and use object pronouns after it. (see the WRF dictionary usage note under "than"). If I use subject pronouns, I include the verb. He is taller than I am. He is taller than me.
    Quote Originally Posted by JulianStuart View Post
    Meanimee's grammar book describes the old version, where than is always a conjunction. Newer views, noted above, accept its use as a preposition.
    I am reminded of a 1950s(?) Consistory Court Case in which the immortal line, “I think we may consider the Bishop’s horse to be an aeroplane.” was uttered. Than’s designation as a preposition was, (i) given its common use about 100 years too late and (ii) indeed most fortuitous given the concern. But then there is always that lingering doubt that the Procrustean designation was made to stop the fighting over “than I/me” rather than for any good reason.

    It makes me think that any statement such as, “Screwdriver is a noun” should be suffixed with “for the time being.”
    "There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn't."

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Native language
    USA, English
    Posts
    8,656

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulQ View Post
    ...It makes me think that any statement such as, “Screwdriver is a noun” should be suffixed with “for the time being.”
    Indeed. As late as 1970 "interface" was a noun. And we all know how that worked out.
    Abutebaris modo subjunctivo denuo.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County CA
    Native language
    English (UK then US)
    Age
    64
    Posts
    12,363

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulQ View Post

    It makes me think that any statement such as, “Screwdriver is a noun” should be suffixed with “for the time being.”
    When I show people my old school class photos, I point to someone very young-looking and say "That's me when I was seven". Does anyone say "That's I when I was seven"?
    Do I infer you would indeed say "That's I when I was seven"?
    Your meaning is not what you think it is, it is what your listener thinks it is

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
    Native language
    English, USA
    Age
    61
    Posts
    4,575

    Re: You drink more beer than me/I.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mistermarcos69 View Post
    Hi everybody!

    I need help with the following sentence:

    You drink more beer than me.

    In particular I need to know if "me" is correct. I think "I" should be used instead of "me".

    What do you think about it?

    Please let me know asap.

    Many thanks

    Marco

    If you want to avoid any controversy whatever you could write "You drink more beer than I do."

    I personally would write "You drink more beer than me."

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    UK
    Native language
    English - England
    Posts
    24,395

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    Quote Originally Posted by JulianStuart View Post
    Do I infer you would indeed say "That's I when I was seven"?
    No, if I recall correctly, the photo was of you, not me.

    However, there is a point here: whereas than has been conveniently classified as a preposition, there is, by the same argument, reason to say that the verb to be takes a complement in the nominative or, in certain circumstances, an object in the accusative.
    "There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn't."

  18. #38
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Native language
    English & Swahili - East Africa
    Posts
    187

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    If you say someone drinks more beer than me, you are implying that you know how much beer me drinks. But I am sure you have some idea of how much beer I drink.
    If you say that you know more about computers than your sister, I am hardly likely to think that your sister is so incomprehensible that you understand her less well than you understand a computer.
    The upshot of it all is that, while I is always right, me is often more natural and easier on the tongue and the ear.
    We usually hear this problem as an argument between "It is I" and "It's me". So far, there are no winners.
    \

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Native language
    USA, English
    Posts
    8,656

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    It would be well into an evening of drinking before I would be certain that my buddy drank more beer than I did. At that point my grammar would be going to hell, and my buddy would never notice.

    All my grade school teachers, who in retrospect all seemed to be teetotalers, taught me to say "I" and not "me". So when sober it is what I do (I am uncertain of my grammar when I'm drunk), and I would suggest that all new learners do the same. Thirteen grades of teetotalers can't all be wrong.
    Abutebaris modo subjunctivo denuo.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Native language
    USA English
    Age
    64
    Posts
    13,223

    Re: I/me: He is better than <I, me>.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulQ View Post
    No, if I recall correctly, the photo was of you, not me.

    However, there is a point here: whereas than has been conveniently classified as a preposition, there is, by the same argument, reason to say that the verb to be takes a complement in the nominative or, in certain circumstances, an object in the accusative.
    English no longer has an accusative case. It has a case for subjects, and a case for everything else. For me the most natural is to use what might be called a disjunctive complement after to be since the complement is neither a subject nor an object. It can of course be different in person and number from the subject, so any "agreement" then is artificial.

    What happened was that, centuries ago, we made a shift from "Hit æm ic" (= "It am I", as in German or Latin) to "(H)it is", followed usually by "me" and, especially when there was a verb of which it could be the subject, sometimes by "I", as in "It is I who speak to you, not your brother."

    Then came Latin as a lingua franca for educated English (and continental Europeans) and a need to make teaching Latin easier for native English speakers. The controversy was born from that need and continues today.

    Than is a different matter because of ambiguity. I would not say "She loves him more than me" to mean "She loves him more than I do", but I would still say "He is better than me", never "He is better than I."

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •