Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 146

Thread: Discussion: [VG, expr.] Euphemisms / les Euphémismes -- "Swearing politely" in English and French

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    France, Paris
    Native language
    France, French
    Posts
    6,716

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Quote Originally Posted by germinal
    No! Blooming hell! sounds a bit naff.

    Bloody can be a little strong in some prissy circles whereas blooming is very safe.
    Good to know... Can give us a sentence with "blooming", to show us how to use it?
    ... she said, with a gallic shrug.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    Native language
    British English
    Posts
    3,701

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Quote Originally Posted by geve
    Is the "oh" compulsory?
    No, the 'oh!' isn't compulsory in front of any of the words I listed. People often say 'oh!' whilst thinking of an apt expression to say
    that will be suitable for the company they are with.

    I think Germinal was objecting to the way I spelt 'Crickey'. I have seen it spelt both with and without the 'c' in the middle. As far as I know, both 'crickey' and 'crikey' are acceptable spellings. It's not listed in any of the dictionaries I have, it's just something that we say. A search on Google reveals many entries for both spellings, but the spelling without the 'c' in the middle is most popular on Google.
    Tresley

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Genève, Suisse
    Native language
    New Zealand, English
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,038

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Damn could offend some people as it has religious undertones, people often say 'darn' instead.

    I say 'gosh', even though it does sound a bit old-fashioned, in a cute sort of way (I hope.) Another one which is basically the same as gosh is 'golly' or even 'golly gosh.' Both are substitutes for 'God' I suppose.

    I never realised that 'bloody' came from 'by our lady'. I think it's more offensive than some of the others mentioned here, but 'blooming' sounds very old-fashioned.

    I think Crikey is Australian for Blimey (which seems British to me.) At least, often when I say it to an American they mention Steve Irwin. As DearPrudence says, they are more expressions of surprise than annoyance. They do appear in 'phrases' as well... 'by crikey' and 'cor blimey' which mean the same thing as crikey and blimey, as far as I know.

    Aha, according to this site, 'cor blimey' comes from 'God blind me'.

    About the worst swear word I use is 'crap' which I consider to be acceptable because it is used on The Simpsons.

    Also, there's 'sheesh!' which I suppose comes from 'Jesus'. And strewth, which is perhaps more Australian. Aha... I just searched for strewth and found this list of synonyms for it, including crumbs (only for annoyance, not surprise), goodness, holy cow/smoke, gracious, my word, Gordon Bennett (all of these are more for surprise than annoyance, I'd say), and a few others we haven't mentioned yet.

    I'm on a roll here... my nieces say 'holy moley' as an expression of surprise. And, Robin (Batman's sidekick) used to say all sorts of funny things after 'holy', like 'holy fruit salad!'. I use that one sometimes just for fun.
    Last edited by calembourde; 16th April 2006 at 2:12 AM.
    …the same language means the same mentality. In this sense thinking and language are linked together. -- Albert Einstein

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    France, Paris
    Native language
    France, French
    Posts
    6,716

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Indeed, "crikey" wins over "crickey" 20:1 on a google fight

    Found on wiktionary:
    crikey!
    1. Used euphemistically for Christ as a mild expression of surprise, especially in Australia, and often in Britain.
    2. Used as an exclamation, or as an emphasis of fact at the conclusion of a statement.
    It's a hot day today, by crikey!
    3. Often used with Moses, similar to crikey on its own, especially in Australia.
    Crikey moses!
    Calembourde, thanks! I feel more confident now to face everyday life, with all these useful and funny swearing tools!

    An interesting man, this Gordon Bennett.
    Last edited by geve; 16th April 2006 at 2:29 AM. Reason: anybody wants a "t"? merci karine ;-)
    ... she said, with a gallic shrug.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    Native language
    British English
    Posts
    3,701

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Quote Originally Posted by geve
    Can give us a sentence with "blooming", to show us how to use it?
    We might say:

    'Oh blooming heck! My computer's crashed again!'

    Or

    'This blooming computer keeps crashing! What's wrong with it"?

    Or

    'The blooming day my computer stops crashing, I'll be happy'

    Hope this helps you to understand.
    Tresley

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Genève, Suisse
    Native language
    New Zealand, English
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,038

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    I just thought of 'flip!' as a substitute for the other four-letter F word ('flippin' is the adjective form.)

    So now we need more French terms. There is the obsolete sacré bleu, and apparently 'sacré' can be used in other ways too, according to this thread. I have read 'nom d'un chien!' in a novel, which I assume is a substitution for 'nom de dieu.' How polite is that?
    …the same language means the same mentality. In this sense thinking and language are linked together. -- Albert Einstein

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    France, Paris
    Native language
    France, French
    Posts
    6,716

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Nom d'un chien ! is very safe. So is nom d'un petit bonhomme ! which I find especially cute, along with nom d'une pipe ! that Lezert posted in post #6 (they all sound a bit outdated though).
    All these "nom de..." must be euphemisms for "nom de dieu" I guess

    I can't think of other words than the ones already listed... for the moment.
    But you'll find some nice old jurons in these lyrics (Merci à Jean-Michel !) - I'll add bigre to the list, which can still be heard for surprise/disbelief.
    Note also that you can combine flûte and zut, and say flûte de zut!
    ... she said, with a gallic shrug.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Bretagne, France
    Native language
    français de France
    Posts
    24,386

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Un petit favori personnel : nom de nom !
    À propos de nom d'un chien, déjà les Grecs juraient par le chien ! Ce pourrait être celui des Enfers, Cerbère.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    France
    Native language
    English UK
    Posts
    1,981

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    What the blazes do you think you're doing ? Put those blasted knitting needles down.
    A quotation deeply embedded in my long-term memory, courtesy of a religious teacher.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Genève, Suisse
    Native language
    New Zealand, English
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,038

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    The funny thing about nom d'un chien is that in a way it would make more sense in English. There's a joke that an insomniac agnostic dyslexic is somebody who stays awake at night wondering if there really is a dog.
    …the same language means the same mentality. In this sense thinking and language are linked together. -- Albert Einstein

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Jersey Channel Islands
    Native language
    English
    Posts
    769

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Quote Originally Posted by geve
    As for the English, I believe "Good heavens!" is pretty much like "Bonté divine" ?
    I was happy to find the word shucks in that thread, but I'm not sure how it sounds to a native ear exactly...

    Shucks always sounds like something that an American farmer would say(sorry don't mean to offend if there are any Americans in this morning)
    Last edited by wildan1; 18th July 2012 at 5:16 AM.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Genève, Suisse
    Native language
    New Zealand, English
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,038

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    I would say 'shucks' not as an expression of annoyance and belief, but more embarrassed modesty after a compliment... e.g.

    calembourde, you're my favourite forero!
    calembourde: Aw, shucks

    There's a definition here, with an example of it being used as an adjective to describe the grin that somebody might have when saying it.
    …the same language means the same mentality. In this sense thinking and language are linked together. -- Albert Einstein

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Native language
    English -UK
    Posts
    47

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Quote Originally Posted by germinal
    It's `Naff Off`and it can be quite offensive if said in an agressive manner. `Naff` on its own simply means poor quality, not up to standard, silly, stupid (remark) etc. I have no idea why it has been coupled with `off` in this way.

    .
    Beware! Naff on its own just means "useless" BUT Naff-off is Offensive! though in these sad times all too often used. It is used as a substitute for F-off. Not to be used for anyone you should respect. Blimey/Blooming much used instead of Bloody - though blimey has its roots in "G'd blind me" now with the passage of time forgotten. Crikey is sub for Ch'st and is a bit passe- probably still OK at the cricket club/old school tie set

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Native language
    English -UK
    Posts
    47

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Quote Originally Posted by geve
    Good to know... Can give us a sentence with "blooming", to show us how to use it?
    I am blooming well fed up with blooming going out to clear up next door's cat's mess off the the blooming lawn

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Cambridge
    Native language
    English UK
    Age
    27
    Posts
    624

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    what about "flippin 'ec"!! or "for goodness sake"! this can express exasperation and annoyance.
    are we going to move on to people? because my auntie is fond of using the word 'wombat' for a silly person. you can also say 'silly old fool' for those old drivers that pull out without looking - that always makes me laugh though. twit isn't strong. prat is a bit stronger but not really offensive.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Genève, Suisse
    Native language
    New Zealand, English
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,038

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    To me, twit has connotations of stupidity while prat is more somebody who is annoying (an arsehole, basically).

    There's also ninny which is the same as twit
    …the same language means the same mentality. In this sense thinking and language are linked together. -- Albert Einstein

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Cambridge
    Native language
    English UK
    Age
    27
    Posts
    624

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    yes that's true, calembourde. but i wouldn't recommend arsehole as a polite insult! oh there's also moron, loser, and a new favourite is wang (!) which adults hate because it is mainly used by teenagers. it's a very stupid word but a good euphemism for that word rhyming with banker!!!

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    France
    Native language
    English, Hodgepodge
    Posts
    1,566

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Dash it! I say that pretty often.
    Be still, thou poodle.
    -Goethe

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Relaxing at Osborne, Isle of Wight
    Native language
    England, English
    Posts
    5,708

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Let's not forget our old friend ''flaming Norah!''. I'll have to do some reasearch on her.

    Also, ''Well I'll go to the foot of our stairs!'' for incredulity.

    The Irish say ''Jesus, Mary and Joseph!'' and ''Bejabers and begorrah!"


    LRV

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    City of Brotherly Love
    Native language
    USA English
    Posts
    4,995

    Re: "Swearing politely" in French and English: Expressions of annoyance and disbelief

    Quote Originally Posted by DearPrudence
    Just coming to my mind: have we said 'gosh'? Is it still used? Doesn't it sound a bit too old-fashioned?
    I'm not sure that gosh is very old-fashioned. I hear it and use it. In American English, we use "darn" to avoid damn. Damn might raise some eyebrows. We also say Oh crap, instead of oh sh**.
    And we say "freakin'".

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •