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Thread: Most frequent surnames

  1. #41
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Hulalessar View Post
    Can anyone explain why Brown, Green, White, Black and Grey are common surnames but Red, Yellow and Blue are not?
    In Czech republic the most common ´colour surnames´ are Černý(Black) , Šedivý (Grey) , Červený (Red) , Bílý ( White)

    The most common surnames of all are following :
    Novák ( nový=new)
    Novotný
    Svoboda(=freedom)
    Černý(=black)
    Dvořák
    Kovář(=smith)
    Horák ( hora=mountain)
    Procházka(=a walk)
    Veselý(=merry)

  2. #42
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by basslop View Post
    Most surnames in Norway are of type "-sen" which corresponds to "-son" in English. The rest are mostly names describing nature elements, like -berg/-fjell (rock/mountain), -vann (water), -ås/-li/-bakke (hill), jordet (field), -myr (moor), -skog (wood), etc. I would guess that the colour names are a kind of description of nature. Røed may for instance describe that the family has its origin at a place with red sunsets or very strong autumn colours.
    Most common surnames in Norway (from Statistisk Sentralbyrå):
    1. Hansen
    2. Johansen
    3. Olsen
    4. Larsen
    5. Andersen
    6. Pedersen
    7. Nilsen
    8. Kristiansen
    9. Jensen
    10.Karlsen
    11.Johnsen
    12.Pettersen
    13.Eriksen
    14.Berg
    15.Haugen
    16.Hagen
    17.Johannessen
    18.Andreassen
    19.Halvorsen
    21.Dahl
    22.Jørgensen
    23.Henriksen
    24.Lund
    25.Sørensen
    As you can see the grand majority were originally patronymics, but are now used as surnames. Very few people in Norway use true patronymics nowadays (they still exist though). As a general rule, when it was decided around 1900 that by law everyone had to have a surname, most people chose either such a patronymic or the name of the farm they lived on. Most farm names are topographic descriptions. The names Berg, Haugen, Hagen, Dahl and Lund mean (small) mountain, the hill, the garden, valley and grove, respectively.
    La tristezza passerà domattina, e l'anello resterà sulla spiaggia...

  3. #43
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Most frequent "color" surnames in Catalan would be Roig (red), Blanc (white) and maybe Negre (black).

    Maybe Roig and Negre don't really refer to the color itself, since in the southern areas of País Valencià (and maybe other places as well) these words are used to call strangers, depending on the color of their hair... Negre/negra for black or dark brown hair or roig/roja for light brown/blond/red hair (I think this is a dialectal transformation of ros/rossa, meaning blond, and not "red").
    This makes some dark-skinned (and hence dark-haired) immigrants think we're racist, since we're literally calling them like "hey you, black!"... Most don't notice we also call eachother "black". :P

  4. #44
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Very interesting discussion!
    I was wondering if in other languages surnames expecially made for orphans are common. In Italian among the most common surnames we have "Esposito" (that means exposed, abandoned child) from Naples and "Colombo" (which comes from a marble statue representing a pigeon, symbol of the hospital in Milan, where children were left).
    Looking through the posts, it doesn't seem there's something similar in other languages... or maybe they're just not that common?

  5. #45
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by milanoinnevata View Post
    Very interesting discussion!
    I was wondering if in other languages surnames expecially made for orphans are common. In Italian among the most common surnames we have "Esposito" (that means exposed, abandoned child) from Naples and "Colombo" (which comes from a marble statue representing a pigeon, symbol of the hospital in Milan, where children were left).
    Looking through the posts, it doesn't seem there's something similar in other languages... or maybe they're just not that common?
    In Spanish there's also Expósito, and Blanco is frequent among orphans.
    FAVSTA DIES TIBI ILLVCEAT

  6. #46
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by milanoinnevata View Post
    I was wondering if in other languages surnames expecially made for orphans are common. In Italian among the most common surnames we have "Esposito" (that means exposed, abandoned child) from Naples (...)
    Looking through the posts, it doesn't seem there's something similar in other languages... or maybe they're just not that common?
    I wrote about it a couple of pages ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by Valeria Mesalina View Post

    There is, too, a terrible name quite common here: Expósito (abandoned at birth). I can only imagine that, due to the massive male emigration during past centuries, the number of illegitimate chidren spread like fire.
    I don´t know how abandoned children were named in other countries; I remember Oliver was named Twist because "he came in the "T´s". But that, of course, happened in a novel.
    Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe. A. Einstein.

  7. #47
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by milanoinnevata View Post
    Very interesting discussion!
    I was wondering if in other languages surnames expecially made for orphans are common. In Italian among the most common surnames we have "Esposito" (that means exposed, abandoned child) from Naples and "Colombo" (which comes from a marble statue representing a pigeon, symbol of the hospital in Milan, where children were left).
    Looking through the posts, it doesn't seem there's something similar in other languages... or maybe they're just not that common?
    Sirota or Sirotta (from Russian "сирота", "orphan") is a common ukrainian/russian and mainly jewish surname.

    Once I heard that, in certain historical period, orphans were name after an orphanage called "Santamaría" -one of the more or less common spanish surnames-, maybe it's just a "popular myth".

    Concernig to colour-related surnames, spanish "Negrete" is one of them and Italian "Nero" (black).

    Here some of the rarer spanish surnames:

    Bueno = Good
    Feo = Ugly
    Delgado = Thin
    Grande = Big
    Maestro = Master, magister
    Rico = Rich
    Leal = Loyal
    Clemente = Merciful
    Cabeza de Vaca = Cow's head
    Lazo = Bound
    Caballero and Zaldívar, both meanid "knight", the last one of basque origin.

    "A Zapatista ain't a shoemaker."

  8. #48
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by HUMBERT0 View Post
    García . Of Pre-Roman origin, either Iberian or Basque
    Garcéz = hijo de García.

  9. #49
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Me pregunto y les pregunto, ¿a qué se debe la formación de los apellidos dobles?

    Recuerdo un compañero de liceo llamado:
    Juan Agustín García Moreno García Huidobro.

  10. #50
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by gatogab View Post
    Me pregunto y les pregunto, ¿a qué se debe la formación de los apellidos dobles?

    Recuerdo un compañero de liceo llamado:
    Juan Agustín García Moreno García Huidobro.
    Al afán de diferenciarse de tantos otros Garcías.

  11. #51
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by ManPaisa View Post
    Al afán de diferenciarse de tantos otros Garcías.
    ¡Qué raro!
    Así como dices, no hicieron más que complicarse la existencia.
    Sobre todo si van a paises donde hay espacio sólo para un nombre y un apellido en los papeles burocráticos.

  12. #52
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by gatogab View Post
    Sobre todo si van a paises donde hay espacio sólo para un nombre y un apellido en los papeles burocráticos.
    Pues, que los unan, como lo hicieron los Finzi-Continis de la ficción.

  13. #53
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by ManPaisa View Post
    Pues, que los unan, como lo hicieron los Finzi-Continis de la ficción.
    Finales de los años treinta en Ferrara, Italia. Los Finzi Contini son una de las familias más influyentes de la ciudad. Ricos, aristocráticos, urbanos... y también judíos.
    Si interesa el argumento, pinchar aquí

  14. #54
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    The major problem in Quebec with surnames, is that there are alot of variations of surnames. The problem comes from the fact that most of the population, since the period of Lower and Upper Canada, were illiterated. Most of the French Canadian at that time were farmers. Only small part of the French population had an important job such as doctor, lawyer, etc.
    Even in the beginning of the 20th century, the majority of the population was still illitared. The ideas promoted by the Church did not help at all. They promoted values such as the family, fear of strangers, the importance of having a land (''le retour à la terre), etc.
    The goal of the Church was to «protect» the french culture from its «ennemies». Thus, the Church said that French Canadians had to closing in on themselves to survive.
    The fact that they were illiterated did not leave any written documents which would give the appropriate form of the surname.

    Otherwise than that, it seems that most of the surnames in Quebec come from the first wave of immigrants from France which arrived on the new land.

    Source:http://www.genealogie.umontreal.ca/fr/nomsPrenoms.htm
    (Univerty of Montreal's research on first names and surnames.)
    Last edited by 20100; 17th March 2010 at 2:29 AM. Reason: Mistakes (Grammar, syntax, etc.)
    Many doors open to destiny; up to you to choose the most suitable one.

  15. #55
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by milanoinnevata View Post
    Very interesting discussion!
    I was wondering if in other languages surnames expecially made for orphans are common. In Italian among the most common surnames we have "Esposito" (that means exposed, abandoned child) from Naples and "Colombo" (which comes from a marble statue representing a pigeon, symbol of the hospital in Milan, where children were left).
    Looking through the posts, it doesn't seem there's something similar in other languages... or maybe they're just not that common?
    In Greek there is Βρετ(τ)ός [Vretos] - foundling. I have also heard the Italian derived Βεντούρας - Ventouras - of the wind, mentioned in this regard but I'm not sure.

    Edit: Somewhat related to the above are the surnames: Αγοραστός (Agorastos - bought) and Πουλημένος (Poulimenos - sold).
    Last edited by shawnee; 18th March 2010 at 7:51 AM. Reason: added the edit.

  16. #56
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Back to Wales!

    The Welsh, as with other parts of the world (e.g. other Celtic-speaking countries, Scandinavia), used to employ patronymics, formed with the word ap and then the father's name. So, for example, a famous 13th Welsh prince was Llywelyn ap Gruffydd - Llywelyn's father was called Gruffydd. Sometimes, you got a list of names going back a number of generations (so you might have something like Gwilym ap Dafydd ap Llywelyn ap Rhys ap Llywelyn etc etc).

    The word ab was used if the name followed starts with a vowel (e.g. Llywelyn ab Iorwerth) - means the same as ap (son of) but the change in vowel is related to sound changes related to Welsh consonant mutation rules.

    Women used ferch (meaning daughter of) instead of ap (e.g. Gwladys ferch Llywelyn).

    This patronymic system is the origin of many of the common Welsh surnames, which were anglicised by simply sticking an 's' on the end of the anglicised name (hence Williams, Evans (from the name Ifan), Jones (from the name Ioan)).

    In Wales today, especially amongst the Welsh-speaking community, the traditional patronymic system is gaining ground again and some people have "welshified" their names back to a traditional Welsh name, or have taken their father's given name as their new patronymic surname, so you do get some people with ap in their full names again.

  17. #57
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Hungarian (2009 data)

    1. Nagy (big)
    2. Kovács (smith)
    3. Tóth (Slovak)
    4. Szabó (tailor)
    5. Horváth (Croatian)
    6. Varga (cobbler)
    7. Kiss (klein)
    8. Molnár (miller)
    9. Németh (Deutsch)
    10. Farkas (wolf)
    11. Balogh (left-handed)
    12. Papp (priest)
    13. Takács (weaver)
    14. Juhász (shepherd)
    15. Lakatos (locksmith; most common Roma surname)
    16. Mészáros (butcher)
    17. Oláh (Wallachian)
    18. Simon (Sim(e)on)
    19. Rácz (Serbian)
    20. Fekete (black)
    Last edited by Encolpius; 21st March 2010 at 9:11 AM.
    [ɒkinɛk humorɒ vɒn, mindɛnˤtud, ɒkinɛk niŋʧ, mindɛnrɛ ke.pɛʃ]

  18. #58
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Hola,

    En rumano tenemos / In Romanian we have:

    - Popescu; (from Pop I suppose)
    - Ionescu; (Ion)
    - Georgescu; (George)
    - Marinescu; (Marin)
    - Teodorescu... (Teodor)

    Los apellidos más comunes acaban en -escu y suelen formarse a raíz de nombres de pila.

    Saludos.
    Nunca te acostarás sin saber una cosa más.

  19. #59
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    SPAIN

    Here's a list of the 10 most common surnames in Spain with translation in english.

    NOTE: Suffix -ez is pre-roman, maybe celtiberian, and it means "son of". (for example, Fernández is "son of Fernando"). But as Fernando means "Daring Pacificator", ultimate translation would be "son of the Daring Pacifactor".


    1. García – 1.378.000 (3,48%) discussed origin, although pre-roman, maybe from celtiberian or basque, meaning "prince of beautiful look", or "young", or "bear", depending on interpretations.

    2. Fernández – 851.000 (2,15%) son of Fernando (son of the Daring Pacificator).

    3. González – 839.000 (2,12%) son of Gonzalo (son of the One
    Willing to Fight
    ).

    4. Rodríguez – 804.000 (2,03%) son of Rodrigo (son of the One Famed by his Strenght).

    5. López – 796.000 (2,01%) son of Lope (son of the Wolf).

    6. Martínez – 788.000 (1,97%) son of Martín (son the Warrior of Mars).

    7. Sánchez – 725.000 (1,83%) son of Sancho (son of the Saint).

    8. Pérez – 709.000 (1,79%) son of Pedro (son of the Stone).

    9. Martín – 459.000 (1,16%) Warrior of Mars.

    10. Gómez – 440.000 (1,11%) son of Gome/Guillermo (son of the Strong Protector)

    These are almost all patronimical surnames (you name after your father), but there are many others not patronimical such as:

    TOPONIMICALS SURNAMES: (place of origin)

    Soriano (from Soria)
    Barceló (from Barcelona)
    Riancho (from the Wide River)
    del Bosque (from the Woods)
    del Río (from the River)
    del Puente (from the Bridge)
    de la Torre (from the Tower)
    (in this case the preposition "de" doesn't indicate nobility. "De" as a preposition of nobility usually is followed by the family name, not a toponim; for example: "Marqués de Santillana" (Marquis of Santillana)

    PROFESSION SURNAMES:

    Herrero/Ferrero (Blacksmith)
    Ballester/Ballestero/Ballesteros (Crossbow Soldier)
    Caballero (Knight)
    Molinero (Miller)
    Panadero (Baker)

    NICKNAMES/DESCRIPTIONS:

    Alegre (Joyful)
    Cortés (Courteous)
    Calvo (Bald)
    Matamoros (Moorslayer)
    Last edited by Blas de Lezo; 27th March 2010 at 3:17 PM.
    PLUS ULTRA - "Further Beyond". ¡Always! [My contributions are under a European Spanish language point of view, unless stated otherwise.]

  20. #60
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Interesting topic.
    Chinese surname is given in some different way. Principally you can build a surname with any one or two Chinese characters. A few parents begin to build surname with more than two characters now, but this is not recommended, because it will cause some typsetting porblem when fill a formular, which generally have maximum 4 spaces for a full name, (maxinum 2 characters for family name and another 2 for surname).

    Oh, most commen name now in China? lets me think about that:
    Here I give the Chinese Charaters, Chinese phonetic, english meaning and German meaning (for Frank )
    Male:
    伟 (Wei) - great, magnificent, gross (de)
    强 (Qiang)- strong, stark (de)
    军 (Jun) - army, Heer (de)
    明 (Ming)- light, hell (de)
    刚 (Gang) - strong, hard, stark(de), hart(de)

    Female:
    芳 (Fang) - fragrant, duftend(de)
    红 (Hong) - Red, rot(de)
    淑 (Shu) - gentle, charming, mild (de), sanftmuetig(de)
    洁 (jie) - pure, virtuous, sanctity , heilig (de)

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