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Thread: Most frequent surnames

  1. #61
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    The commenest Gujarati surname has to be PATEL!
    Then Desai, Naik.. can't think of anymore.

    I remember in La Réunion (Réunion Island, French overseas department), the commonest Indian surname there was Omarji.
    It's always OK in the end. If it's not OK, then it's not the end.

  2. #62
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by milanoinnevata View Post
    Very interesting discussion!
    I was wondering if in other languages surnames expecially made for orphans are common. In Italian among the most common surnames we have "Esposito" (that means exposed, abandoned child) from Naples
    In Italy there are also Degli Innocenti, Innocenti (not guilty) and Esposti, Degli Esposti (in the same meaning of Esposito).
    Në e di, ma thuaj! Gli intolleranti possono rendermi intollerante...

  3. #63
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by pizzi View Post
    In Italy there are also Degli Innocenti, Innocenti (not guilty) and Esposti, Degli Esposti (in the same meaning of Esposito).
    Right. IN my hometown we have many Espositos, Italian descendents like me. Anyway, as half of the population in my hometown is of Italian origin, you'll find the most common Italian surnames there (but mine that is rare even in Italy).
    Eu quase que nada não sei. Mas desconfio de muita coisa...- Guimarães Rosa

  4. #64
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    I found list of 1000 most frequent surnames in Czech Republic, so here are 20 most frequent:

    1. Novák (nový = new)
    2. Svoboda (it literally means "freedom")
    3. Novotný (nový = new)
    4. Dvořák (dvůr = court, yard)
    5. Černý (it literally means "black")
    6. Procházka (it l. m. "a walk")
    7. Kučera (no idea what it means)
    8. Veselý (it l. m. "cheerful" or "merry")
    9. Horák (hora = mountain)
    10. Němec (it l. m. "a German")
    11. Marek (male name "Mark")
    12. Pokorný (it l. m. "humble")
    13. Pospíšil (pospíšit si = to hurry up)
    14. Hájek (háj = grove)
    15. Jelínek (it l. m. "small deer")
    16. Král (it. l. m. "king")
    17. Růžička (it l. m. "small rose")
    18. Beneš (no idea what it means)
    19. Fiala (fialový = violet)
    20. Sedláček (sedlo = saddle)

  5. #65
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by mirx View Post
    México, and I assume all other Spanish-speaking countries, have surnames deriving from personal names, such as:
    Martinez = Son of Martin.
    Fernandez = Son of Ferdinand
    Perez = Son of Peter.

    These would be the commonest surnames.

    Family names derived from occupations are also quite popular.

    Herrera : Blacksmith
    Pescador: Fisherman.
    Molina : Miller
    Zapatero: Shoemaker

    My mind is tired so I presume a lot of occupation-related names are escaping me.

    I beg your pardon, Fernández means son of Fernando, not of Ferdinando, which would be Ferdinández

    ... I guess you have Taylor too: Sastre

  6. #66
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Agró View Post
    In Spanish there's also Expósito, and Blanco is frequent among orphans.
    Hi Agrò.
    I very well unbderstand why "Expósito" is, originally, a common name for orphans, but why "Blanco"? Does it depend on the colour of the tissue they were wrapped in before being "exposed"?

    Is also "Rueda" such a surname? I thought it might be because of the wheel they were left in.

  7. #67
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Blechi View Post
    Is also "Rueda" such a surname? I thought it might be because of the wheel they were left in.
    Rueda is also a municipality in Spain. Maybe the surname refers to it?

  8. #68
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Blas de Lezo View Post
    8. Pérez [...] son of Pedro (son of the Stone).
    Yo habría jurado que Pérez era un nombre hebreo.
    Prendre un dictionnaire, barrer tous les mots à barrer, signer : revu et corrigé. [Marcel Duchamp]

  9. #69
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Hakro View Post
    Rueda is also a municipality in Spain. Maybe the surname refers to it?
    Surely.
    Most Spanish surnames come from first names ( González, Pérez), place names ( Cáceres, Zamora) physical appearence ( Rubio, Moreno, Calvo) and professions ( Zapatero, Herrero).

  10. #70
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Blechi View Post
    Hi Agrò.
    I very well unbderstand why "Expósito" is, originally, a common name for orphans, but why "Blanco"? Does it depend on the colour of the tissue they were wrapped in before being "exposed"?

    Is also "Rueda" such a surname? I thought it might be because of the wheel they were left in.
    Hi, Blechi. It could well be as you say or because orphans were thought of as being innocent creatures, and white, of course, represents innocence. Not sure.
    FAVSTA DIES TIBI ILLVCEAT

  11. #71
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Blechi View Post
    I beg your pardon, Fernández means son of Fernando, not of Ferdinando, which would be Ferdinández

    ... I guess you have Taylor too: Sastre
    We have taylors too, and my post was translated. To my knowledge Fernando is Ferdinand in (old) English, although presumibly now Gaga's Fernando might be much more fashionable.

  12. #72
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Agró View Post
    It could well be as you say or because orphans were thought of as being innocent creatures, and white, of course, represents innocence. Not sure.
    Just a guess: For an orphan, in the church register of people, it was blanco where the parents names should be. What do you think?

  13. #73
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by Hakro View Post
    Just a guess: For an orphan, in the church register of people, it was blanco where the parents names should be. What do you think?
    You mean a blank space? Well, it might be so.
    FAVSTA DIES TIBI ILLVCEAT

  14. #74
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by rusita preciosa View Post
    4. Попов (Popov) – son of a priest (yes, Orthodox priests are allowed – even encouraged – to have large families and boy they did, hence Popov is 4th most common family name! )
    Cool lol, in my family we nicknamed one of my uncles Popov. He's not the son of a priest though, far from.

  15. #75
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by swift View Post
    Yo habría jurado que Pérez era un nombre hebreo.
    No. Pérez or Peres are found among Sephardi Jews (as an example, Simon Peres) but (as far as I know), not in Askenazi Jews since it is an Iberian surname whose origin is the same as Martínez, Gómez, etc.
    Only a Spanish speaker. If you need an exact translation, wait for better opinions.

  16. #76
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Una duda: ¿López es "hijo de Lope"? (como Lope de Vega). ¿Se sigue usando el nombre Lope en España?
    science... never solves a problem without creating ten more

  17. #77
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by treulen View Post
    Una duda: ¿López es "hijo de Lope"? (como Lope de Vega). ¿Se sigue usando el nombre Lope en España?
    Sí, Lope es hijo de Lope.
    No es un nombre que se use actualmente...ahora bien, hay una tendencia entre los pijos españoles desde hace unos años que es rescatar para sus hijos nombres olvidados con resonancias medievales etc. como Alonso o Beltrán, con lo cual no hay que descartar que dentro de unos pocos años se pongan de moda los Lopes.

  18. #78
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    There is an other kind of orphan surnames, or surnames of children that were not wanted and therefore abbandoned and left in a place where someone could find them:

    Delarue, Delerue (French, of/from the street)
    (de) Léglise (French, of/from the church)
    Dalla Chiesa (Italian, from the church)
    Casagrande (Italian/Spanish, big house)
    (van de) Kerkhof (Dutch, court of the church)
    Kirchhof (German, court of the church)
    Temple (English, church)

    etc....

    (Of course, these surnames can have also different histories in some cases)

  19. #79
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Los apellidos Santamaría y Santacruz, al fin y al cabo, ¿son de origen sefardita?

  20. #80
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    Re: Most frequent surnames

    Quote Originally Posted by francisgranada View Post
    (van de) Kerkhof (Dutch, court of the church)
    Not to be annoying or anything but (van de) Kerkhof actually means (from the) Graveyard, hof does mean court and kerk means church and kerkhof means such literally, but it's not used that way as far as I know. Just so you know

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