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Thread: Persian/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

  1. #1
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    Persian/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Let's do some linguistic analyzing

    Please excuse the lack of Arabic text; I'm still trying to figure out how to do it properly on my computer. So here's my attempted, accented Romanized Farsi:

    ú - oo as in food
    í - ee as in meet
    ao - ou as in shout

    WITHOUT ACCENTS:
    u - u as in under

    Farsi - Daily Life

    TIMES OF DAY
    Morning-- súb
    Afternon -- chosht
    Night - shao

    DAILY VERBS
    To wake up - khístun
    To go to sleep - khowshouldun (khow-should-un)
    To eat - khordun
    To get - giriftun
    To talk - gupzudun

    DAILY MEALS
    Breakfast - non-a-súb
    Lunch - non-a-chosht
    Dinner- non-a-shao

    COMMON DRINKS
    water - ao (this is the spoken Farsi, written it would be aab)
    milk - shír

    COMMON FOODS
    rice - birinj
    chicken - gúsht-a-murgh
    turkey - phílmurgh (turkey as in meat: gúsht-a-phílmurgh)
    lamb - guszfund (lamb as in meat: gúsht-a-guszfund)
    meat - gúsht

    COMMON DESSERTS
    candy - shírní
    cookie - culchuh

    Hope this is good enough for now.
    Bien


    Más contexto, más contento. Ayúdenos a mejorar las traducciones. Denos contexto.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Interesting Bien
    Unfortunately, there are not many common words with Arabic


    Morning-- súb This is like the Arabic sub7صُبْح

    Dinner- non-a-shao a-sho reminded me of 3ashaa2 عشاء

    candy - shírní This reminds me of my name شيرين which is only used as a name (mainly for girls, but sometimes for boys too)

    Maybe other foreros would find more similarities I couldn't perceive
    Cherine شيرين

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by cherine
    Interesting Bien
    Unfortunately, there are not many common words with Arabic


    Morning-- súb This is like the Arabic sub7صُبْح

    Dinner- non-a-shao a-sho reminded me of 3ashaa2 عشاء

    candy - shírní This reminds me of my name شيرين which is only used as a name (mainly for girls, but sometimes for boys too)

    Maybe other foreros would find more similarities I couldn't perceive
    Cherine شيرين
    Yes Shirín (Cherine!) means sweet in Farsi. Is it the same in Arabic?

    Bien
    Más contexto, más contento. Ayúdenos a mejorar las traducciones. Denos contexto.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    lol, unfortunately no. As I said, this word is only known as a person's name. I can eve assure you that many Shirín(s) don't know the meaning of their own name
    sweet or candy, in Arabic, is 7alwa حلوى

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by cherine
    lol, unfortunately no. As I said, this word is only known as a person's name. I can eve assure you that many Shirín(s) don't know the meaning of their own name
    sweet or candy, in Arabic, is 7alwa حلوى
    Wow! That's so interesting, Cherine! We came across a similarity in Farsi and Arabic just now!

    Alwa in Farsi is a sweet Afghan dish (kind of like oatmeal, but a lot sweeter) It's made using flour, sugar, and oil. It's a great alternative to regular breakfast!

    What a coincidence!

    I always learn something new from you Cherine!

    Bien
    Más contexto, más contento. Ayúdenos a mejorar las traducciones. Denos contexto.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    hey!
    I couldn't find so similarities between Turkish word and the word both of you wrote.
    hera they are some daily life terms in Turkish:

    morning- sabah
    afternoon-akşam
    night-gece

    DAILY VERBS
    To wake up - uyanmak
    To go to sleep-uyumaya gitmek
    To eat - yemek
    To talk - konuşmak

    DAILY MEALS
    Breakfast - kahvaltı
    Lunch - öğle yemeği
    Dinner- akşam yemeği

    COMMON DRINKS
    water - su
    milk - süt

    COMMON FOODS
    *rice -pirinç (birinj in Farsi)
    chicken - tavuk
    turkey -hindi
    lamb - kuzu eti
    meat - et

    COMMON DESSERTS
    candy - şeker
    cookie - kurabiye

    * how do you say "justice" in Arabic? Is there any similarity the word "hak" or "hukuk" meaning "justice" in Turkish?

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by la tierra
    hey!
    I couldn't find so similarities between Turkish word and the word both of you wrote.
    On the contrary, there are some : wait and see

    morning- sabah this is exactly used in Arabic صباح it's a variation of subH.
    chicken - tavuk there's a certain chicken dish in Egypt called tawúk.
    turkey -hindi here we call it dík ("dík" is rooster) rúmi, but many people also call it dindi

    COMMON DESSERTS
    candy - şeker it resembles the Arabic word for sugar : sukkar

    * how do you say "justice" in Arabic? Is there any similarity the word "hak" or "hukuk" meaning "justice" in Turkish?
    justice is 3adaala عدالة , hak (hukuk is the plural) is right (like rights versus obligations), the law school in Egypt is called kulleyat al-huquuq كلية الحقوق (literaly : faculty of rights)

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by cherine
    On the contrary, there are some : wait and see

    morning- sabah this is exactly used in Arabic صباح it's a variation of subH.
    COMMON DESSERTS
    candy - şeker it resembles the Arabic word for sugar : sukkar
    As Cherine mentioned, sabah seems to be a variation of the Arabic subH and Farsi súb. The interesting thing is that in Farsi sabaah means tomorrow. Another intersting note: Cherine mentioned that sugar in Arabic is sukkar and it's similar to the Turkish word for candy (şeker). In Farsi, shukkur is diabetes, a disease relating to blood sugar problems and the lack of insulin production in the pancreas. Isn't that interesting how all three terms are similar and tie together in one way or another? '

    Bien
    Más contexto, más contento. Ayúdenos a mejorar las traducciones. Denos contexto.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Bienvenidos
    In Farsi, shukkur is diabetes, [...] Isn't that interesting how all three terms are similar and tie together in one way or another? '
    Interesting indeed
    By the way, diabetes is also sukkar in Arabic (at least in Egypt), I heard variations of it, mainly sukkary (which is derivated from sukkar).

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Bienvenidos
    Wow! That's so interesting, Cherine! We came across a similarity in Farsi and Arabic just now!

    Alwa in Farsi is a sweet Afghan dish (kind of like oatmeal, but a lot sweeter) It's made using flour, sugar, and oil. It's a great alternative to regular breakfast!

    What a coincidence!

    I always learn something new from you Cherine!

    Bien
    Just to add, we use the same word in Urdu/Gujarati/Hindi too! (for the same meaning)
    It's always OK in the end. If it's not OK, then it's not the end.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by linguist786
    Just to add, we use the same word in Urdu/Gujarati/Hindi too! (for the same meaning)
    That's very interesting. I'm sure Urdu/Hindi share a lot of roots with the other Indo-Iranian languages. My mother can actually speak Urdu; it's a very interesting language. Thank you for sharing

    Bien
    Más contexto, más contento. Ayúdenos a mejorar las traducciones. Denos contexto.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Hi all,
    Just to comment about "sabah", in other arabic dialects, the exact word sabah صباح is used to mean morning or tomorrow.

    I'm sure there are more similarities, and it is interesting to know about them.

    I have one question here, the farsi word "شيرين", is it feminine or masculine? Or is it for both? Although it is mostly used in arabic as a female name, I can't see a specific reason for that.

    Thanx
    Last edited by Antivirus; 27th June 2006 at 12:08 AM.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Antivirus
    Hi all,
    Just to comment about "sabah", in other arabic dialects, the exact word sabah صباح is used to mean morning or tomorrow.

    I'm sure there are more similarities, and it is interesting to know about them.

    I have one question here, the farsi word "شيرين", is it feminine or masculine? Or is it for both? Although it is mostly used in arabic as a female name, I can't see a specific reason for that.

    Thanx
    Hi there,

    My computer somehow isn't displaying that Farsi word in quotes (it comes up as ????), so the most I can tell you is that Farsi does not have a masculine/feminine system.

    Bien
    Más contexto, más contento. Ayúdenos a mejorar las traducciones. Denos contexto.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Bienvenidos
    Hi there,

    My computer somehow isn't displaying that Farsi word in quotes (it comes up as ????), so the most I can tell you is that Farsi does not have a masculine/feminine system.

    Bien
    hi Bien, and thanx for the fast reply,
    the word was (Cherine). As I understand it is an adjective, isn't it? In Arabic adjectives may have different forms for males and females, Isn't this the case in Farsi also?

    Regards,

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Antivirus
    hi Bien, and thanx for the fast reply,
    the word was (Cherine). As I understand it is an adjective, isn't it? In Arabic adjectives may have different forms for males and females? Isn't this the case in Farsi also?

    Regards,
    Hey!

    Shírín (sweet) is an adjective. Farsi doesn't have a masculine/feminine system like Arabic or Spanish, so it's used with any noun (since all nouns are genderless).

    Nahn-a-shírín (sweet food)
    [Insert Name Here]-a-shírín (sweet [Person's name, as when saying someone is "sweet"]

    Let me know if you have any more questions.

    Bien
    Más contexto, más contento. Ayúdenos a mejorar las traducciones. Denos contexto.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    aunt

    Arabic
    خالَة, عَمَّة

    Urdu/Hindi ﻩﻠﺎﺨ,

    Turkish teyze; hala; yenge.

    Farsi ﻭﻤﻋ ﻥﺯ ‘ﻰﻴﺍﺩ ﻥﺯ ‘ﻩﻠﺎﺨﻩﻤﻋ
    Last edited by MarcB; 28th June 2006 at 5:37 AM.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Hello Bien. Here is my Persian version contribution to tell about the differences:

    English-Persian
    Farsi - Daily Life


    TIMES OF DAY
    Morning- súbh
    Afternoon - asr
    Night - shab


    DAILY VERBS
    To wake up - bidar shodan
    To go to sleep - khabidan
    To eat - khordan
    To get - gereftan/ avardan
    To talk - harf zadan

    DAILY MEALS
    Breakfast - sobhaneh
    Lunch - nahar
    Dinner- sham

    COMMON DRINKS
    water - ab
    milk - shír

    COMMON FOODS
    rice - berenj
    chicken - (gushte)morgh
    turkey - (gushte)buqlamun
    lamb - (gushte)gusfand
    meat - gúsht


    COMMON DESSERTS
    candy - shírní OR abe nabat
    cookie - kolucheh

    Regárds
    Tisia

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Tisia
    DAILY VERBS
    To wake up - bidar shodan
    Hi Tisia

    We also say "bídar shodan" As far as the other minor differences, I think it's caused by one factor: Persian in Afghanistan, when written (i.e. as in a formal letter), is identical to that of Iran, but when spoken, it's a little different.

    Bien
    Más contexto, más contento. Ayúdenos a mejorar las traducciones. Denos contexto.

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Bienvenidos
    Hi Tisia

    We also say "bídar shodan" As far as the other minor differences, I think it's caused by one factor: Persian in Afghanistan, when written (i.e. as in a formal letter), is identical to that of Iran, but when spoken, it's a little different.

    Bien
    ....Yes I know that I can easily understand my Afghan friends here.

    Tisia

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    Re: Farsi/Arabic/Turkish: Daily Life Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Bienvenidos
    Let's do some linguistic analyzing

    Please excuse the lack of Arabic text; I'm still trying to figure out how to do it properly on my computer. So here's my attempted, accented Romanized Farsi:

    ú - oo as in food
    í - ee as in meet
    ao - ou as in shout

    WITHOUT ACCENTS:
    u - u as in under

    Farsi - Daily Life

    TIMES OF DAY
    Morning-- súb
    Afternon -- chosht
    Night - shao

    DAILY VERBS
    To wake up - khístun
    To go to sleep - khowshouldun (khow-should-un)
    To eat - khordun
    To get - giriftun
    To talk - gupzudun

    DAILY MEALS
    Breakfast - non-a-súb
    Lunch - non-a-chosht
    Dinner- non-a-shao

    COMMON DRINKS
    water - ao (this is the spoken Farsi, written it would be aab)
    milk - shír

    COMMON FOODS
    rice - birinj
    chicken - gúsht-a-murgh
    turkey - phílmurgh (turkey as in meat: gúsht-a-phílmurgh)
    lamb - guszfund (lamb as in meat: gúsht-a-guszfund)
    meat - gúsht

    COMMON DESSERTS
    candy - shírní
    cookie - culchuh

    Hope this is good enough for now.
    Bien

    Really fascinating guys! In Hindi:
    TIMES OF DAY
    Morning-- subah, saver
    Afternon -- dopahr
    Night - shaam, raat

    Your word for "to get" is what we use for "arrested." /giraftaar honaa/ means to be arrested.

    We use two words for "meat." /gosht/ and /maas/ with the former being Urdu and the latter being Hindi. Chicken is /murGaa/ in Hindi/Urdu. What is duck for you guys? I have heard that Arabic actually got the word for Duck from Sanskrit...but Im not sure. In Hindi, it is /batakh/.

    Shirni is a candy hear too. And Halwa is identical for us....and a GREAT BREAKFAST substitute I might add! For justice, we'd say /insaafii/ or /nyaai/. The word /haq/ means "one's right" and "haqiiqat" is reality. /haqiiqii/ is real. The Arabic word provided by Cherine (3adaala) is the same in Hindi/Urdu, but the meaning is different. We spell it /3adaalat/ ( I notice that most Arabic words in Urdu have a "t" at the end of them in Urdu...perhaps a phonetic change that occured) and the meaning is "court."

    For Sugar, we say /chiinii/(H/U), /shakkar/(H/U), and /khandh/ (P).
    Correccions en qualsevol idioma sempre són agraïdes.

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