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Thread: Ladybug

  1. #1
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    Ladybug

    In your language, what do you call that funny little red bug with black dots?

    English: ladybug - well, at least that makes some sense given the color,

    but

    Russian: божья коровка [bojia korovka] - God's little cow

  2. #2
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Greek:
    Η πασχαλίτσα
    i pasxalitsa, f.
    lit. "Easter's little thing", probably because it appears during Easter (Πάσχα, Pasxa, in Greek).
    [x] is a voiceless velar fricative, like a hard ch.

  3. #3
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    Re: Ladybug

    French : Coccinelle ou bête à bon dieu (that 2nd one translates as ~ "kind god's creature")

  4. #4
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    Re: Ladybug

    Spanish: Mariquita (which also means gay or effeminate), vaquitas de San Antonio (Saint Anthony's little cow) and probably more names. It seems they are also called "lady cows" in English.
    Every time you don't correct my mistakes, God kills a kitten!

  5. #5
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    Re: Ladybug

    Hello, this can be an interesting thread, I hope many will participate.

    I personally like more the British ladybird, but I am wondering what other regional variants native English speakers know.

    We Hungarians use katicabogár (lit. Catherine's bug), but I call it katalinka (from Catherine, Kate, Kitty), BUT I know the regional variant Isten tehénkéje (lit.: God's little cow), never knew the Russian word.
    Last edited by Encolpius; 1st October 2009 at 10:47 AM.
    [ɒkinɛk humorɒ vɒn, mindɛnˤtud, ɒkinɛk niŋʧ, mindɛnrɛ ke.pɛʃ]

  6. #6
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Finnish:

    Leppäkerttu or leppäpirkko

    Leppä is an old word for blood, here referring to the red colour of the bug. Both Kerttu and Pirkko are common female names, even today.

  7. #7
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    Re: Ladybug

    Latin: coccinella

    from adj. coccinus (red, purple) from coccus/coccum (< Gr. kókkos, a berry)

    Czech: slunéčko sedmitečné (scientific name, seven-dotted little-sun) or beruška (the most common colloquial name, a feminine/diminutive from beran ram)

    Other regional names (mostly forgotten nowadays): bedrunka, medrunka, bedrnička, baruška, berunka, verunka, korunka, okorunka, peperunka, veverunka, pinkalinka, pinka, linka, ankalinka, apolinka, babrdlinka, babulinka, majdalinka, papulinka, popelinka, zlatolinka, halinka, halenka, helenka, kalinka, pólinka, skálinka, pelesa, pelesta;

    pámbíčkova kravička (God's little cow), pámbíčkova ovečka (God's little sheep), pánbíčkova slepička (God's little hen), marianka (< Mary), mariječka (< Mary), panenečka (little virgin), babička sedmibolestná (seven-painfull grannie);

    and many others.
    Last edited by bibax; 1st October 2009 at 6:20 PM.

  8. #8
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Portuguese: joaninha (literally little Jane, little Joanna, or variations of said name).
    Jazyk

  9. #9
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    Re: Ladybug

    What an interesting thread!
    In Argentina they are called vaquitas de San Antonio (Saint Anthony's little cows)
    I didn't know that in Brazil they call them joaninhas ( juanitas in Spanish, little Joan/ Jane) here, when we see a juanita (little Jane) we see a different bug, a dark one with a terrible odor and when it urinates on you, it burns your skin... but that's an issue for another thread
    ¡Saludos desde Argentina! Fabiana

  10. #10
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    Re: Ladybug

    Catalan:
    Panerola -> I'm not sure about the etimology.

  11. #11
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Hebrew it's פרת משה רבנו [parat moshe rabenu]
    para=cow, Moshe Rabenu=Moses.

  12. #12
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Esperanto:

    kokcinelo, Di-besto (God-animal), Maria-skarabo (Mary beetle).
    Nizo "Kiel malvarma akvo por suferanto de soifo, tiel estas bona sciigo el lando malproksima." Salomono

  13. #13
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Arabic, its دعسوقة = da'souqa. Simply the name of the bug.

  14. #14
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    Re: Ladybug

    Quote Originally Posted by Encolpius View Post
    I personally like more the British ladybird, but I am wondering what other regional variants native English speakers know.
    Where I grew up (Devon) they were sometimes called godscows (God's cows), or more often ladyflies instead of ladybirds.

  15. #15
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Dutch: lieveheersbeestje (equivalent of bête à bon dieu)

    In West-Flemish: pimpampoentje.

    More regional names on http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lievehe...jes#Etymologie

  16. #16
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Chinese we call all this kind of insect 瓢虫(piáo chóng).

  17. #17
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    Re: Ladybug

    Quote Originally Posted by MoisesYU View Post
    In Chinese we call all this kind of insect 瓢虫(piáo chóng).
    Does that mean anything else or it's just the name of the insect?

  18. #18
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    Re: Ladybug

    Quote Originally Posted by rusita preciosa View Post
    Does that mean anything else or it's just the name of the insect?
    It just means the insect.

  19. #19
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    Re: Ladybug

    In Lithuanian:
    Boružė or boružytė.

    In Japanese:
    天道虫 or 瓢虫 or 紅娘[tento:mushi] (all 3) meaning: approx. insect of sky path (of Sun (God)) (IMHO it would be the same meaning as in Chinese)
    or 七星天道虫 [nanahoshitento:mushi] meaning: approx. insect of sky path with 7 stars/spots
    Last edited by kusurija; 8th October 2009 at 6:49 PM. Reason: more accurately; as in Chinese?
    Su pagarba: 薬屋 (S úctou: kusurija) As I'm too poor in English, please repair my mistakes. Prašau pataisyti, jei ką netiksliai parašiau.

  20. #20
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    Re: Ladybug

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Quizá View Post
    Spanish: Mariquita (which also means gay or effeminate), vaquitas de San Antonio (Saint Anthony's little cow) and probably more names. It seems they are also called "lady cows" in English.
    Hi:

    In Spanish:

    Perú, España - Mariquitas
    España- Sarantonton
    Chile - Chinitas
    Argentina - vaquitas de San Antonio
    Uruguay - San Antonio
    México - Vaquitas, Catarinas
    Colombia - Petaca

    From:
    Lady Bug [ladybug], lady bird beetle [ladybird], mariquita, chinita, Vaquita de San Antonio, catarina, petaca.
    Last edited by fsabroso; 8th October 2009 at 6:29 PM.
    En el Perú el castellano es el idioma de uso común, y el quechua es una importante herencia de nuestro pasado inca.

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