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Thread: Don't call me a foreigner

  1. #21
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    May 2009
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    Helsinki, Finland
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    Re: Don't call me stranger

    Finnish: Älä sano (t. kutsu) minua ulkomaalaiseksi (t. vierasmaalaiseksi)!
    That which caterpillars call the end of the world, we call the butterfly. Sitä, mitä toukka kutsuu maailmanlopuksi, me kutsumme perhoseksi.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Zulu
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    Re: Don't call me stranger

    Polish:
    Don't call me a foreigner:
    Nie nazywaj mnie cudzoziemcem or polite form Proszę mnie nie nazywać cudzoziemcem.

    Never use the first form though if you're not talking to someone who's young and/or you don't want to show disrespect to the person(s) you're talking to. The exception is of course when the person you're talking with actually wants you to adress him/her using the 2nd singular form, then there's no problem. If you want to know more, read about the usage of ty vs. the usage of pan/pani/państwo in Polish.
    Last edited by inter1908; 1st August 2011 at 1:17 AM.

  3. #23
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    Ukraine
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    Re: Don't call me stranger

    Ukrainian:

    1. Не називай мене чужинцем. (Ne nazyvay mene chuzhyntsem.)

    2. Не називайте мене чужинцем. (Ne nazyvaite mene chuzhyntsem.)

    #1 is used when you speak to somebody (a friend or a well-known person) friendly or in a familiar manner.
    #2 is used when you speak to somebody politely or there are more than one person on the other side.

  4. #24
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    Mar 2008
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    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
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    Re: Don't call me stranger

    Dutch has not been mentioned yet, I think:

    Noem mij geen vreemde. (Vreemdeling would be 'stranger').

  5. #25
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    Germany
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    Re: Don't call me stranger

    Chinese (simplified):
    别叫我外人。 (
    biéjiào wàirén). (don't call me foreigner).
    别叫我老外。
    (biéjiàolǎowài). (don't call me foreigner).
    The difference between wàirén and lǎowài is that the first is (almost) never said directly to a person and that the second is respectful and can be used when addressing a foreigner or said about him in his presence.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Dutch - Netherlands
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    57

    Re: Don't call me stranger

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    Dutch has not been mentioned yet, I think:

    Noem mij geen vreemde. (Vreemdeling would be 'stranger').
    And "foreigner" would be "buitenlander".

    (Noem mij geen buitenlander)

  7. #27
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    Aug 2009
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    София
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    български
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    Re: All languages: Don't call me stranger

    Quote Originally Posted by Maja View Post
    In Serbian:

    Ne nazivaj(te)* me strancem (Cyrillic: Не називај(те)* ме странцем).

    Pozdrav!
    * -te/те is added for formal or plural, not used for informal singular.
    Bulgarian: Не ме наричай(те) чужденец. Те is use for formal or plural too.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Native language
    English - Australia
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    1

    Re: Don't call me stranger

    Angelo, you said "The difference between wàirén and lǎowài is that the first is (almost) never said directly to a person and that the second is respectful and can be used when addressing a foreigner or said about him in his presence." Maybe in your opinion one of these words is "respectful", but when would the term be relevant? Would the person in question be working for the government in the department of immigration in which the use of the term is unavoidable? I suggest that if it's not relevant, then it's rude. For example, if you walk into a shop in China and say that you want to buy something, and the shopkeeper needs to check with his colleague whether they have the item, it would be irrelevant to mention your status of nationality. i.e. "This foreigner wants to know if we've got any wild pepper."

  9. #29
    Join Date
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    Germany
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    Re: Don't call me a foreigner

    Hello Jake (may I call you so?),

    yes, one of the two word is respectful, and not only in my opinion: the difference between 外人 and 老外 is that the first is just a generic term (foreign person, stranger), while the second contains 外: old (connotation: wise and venerable), which is often used when addressing people - and some animals, too. There is another word for "old" ("旧"), which is used for things and means they are worn out, and a third (故), which is used for old, but generally valuable (and valued) things and traditions.
    老虎 - tiger, but the actual name of the animal is just 虎.
    老师 - teacher, but only if speaking about a person or talking to him/her. If the same person had to indicate his/her profession in a bureaucratic form, he/she would say/write 教师.
    大哥 - "big brother", but could be (and is often) said to a taxi driver.

    One of the fascinating thing about the Chinese language are its uncountable ways to address people and other beings: their are (or were) about twenty or thirty ways for a man to say "my wife" or for a woman to say "my husband".

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Greek
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    Re: Don't call me a foreigner

    In Greek:

    «Μη με λες/λέτε ξένο/ξένη*»
    /mi me les [informal or sing.]/'lete [form. or pl.] 'kseno [for masculine]/'kseni [feminine]/

    *Modern Greek noun and adj. «ξένος, -νη, -νο» ('ksenos, m./'kseni, f./'kseno, n.)--> foreigner, alien, stranger deriving from the Classical one «ξένος, -νη, -νον» ('ksĕnŏs, m./ksĕnē, f./'ksĕnŏn, n.) meaning the same; PIE base *ghosti-, strange (cf. Lat. hostis, hospes; Rus. господь, Bulg. господ, BCS господ/gospod, Fr. hôte, Ger. gast, Eng. guest)
    Les Grecs sont étonnants dans l'adversité - François Pouqueville

  11. #31
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    Mar 2008
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    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
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    Re: Don't call me stranger

    DUTCH (correction !):

    I have made a stupid mistake:
    - vreemdeling or more literal buitenlander for foreigner (foreign country, buiten-land, outside-land)
    - vreemde for stranger

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Prague
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    Hungarian
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    4,709

    Re: Don't call me a foreigner

    Oh, yes, those were the days, my friend, when people got many answers in this forum.

    Hungarian: Ne hívj idegennek! Ne nevezz idegennek! [idegen stranger]
    [ɒkinɛk humorɒ vɒn, mindɛnˤtud, ɒkinɛk niŋʧ, mindɛnrɛ ke.pɛʃ]

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