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Thread: I love you or I want you?

  1. #1
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    I love you or I want you?

    This is a two-part question:

    1. In Portugal, when a boy wants to tell a girl that he loves her, he's more likely to use the equivalent of "I like you" than the equivalent of "I love you". The verb "to love" tends to be reserved for very intimate moments. You don't hear it very often in public. Judging from some discussions I've read on the Spanish forums, it looks like the same thing occurs in that language: Te quiero ("I want you") is employed instead of Te amo ("I love you"). I'm wondering how it is in other languages, especially Romance languages. Is the verb "to love" commonly employed in public by lovers to express their feelings towards each other, or does it tend to be replaced with another one?

    I know that this question does not apply to the French language, which uses the verb aimer both for "to love" and for "to like".

    2. In American films and TV, I often see relatives telling each other "I love you", for example a mother to a daughter, or a grandson to grandfather. In Portugal, I think this is unusual. We would normally say the equivalent of "I like you very much", instead. Do relatives tell each other "I love you" in your language?

    Although I'm particularly interested in Romance languages, I'm leaving the thread open to all languages.
    Deuparth gwaith yw ei ddechrau.

  2. #2
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Outsider
    This is a two-part question:

    1. In Portugal, when a boy wants to tell a girl that he loves her, he's more likely to use the equivalent of "I like you" than the equivalent of "I love you". The verb "to love" tends to be reserved for very intimate moments. You don't hear it very often in public. Judging from some discussions I've read on the Spanish forums, it looks like the same thing occurs in that language: Te quiero ("I want you") is employed instead of Te amo ("I love you"). I'm wondering how it is in other languages, especially Romance languages. Is the verb "to love" commonly employed in public by lovers to express their feelings towards each other, or does it tend to be replaced with another one?

    I know that this question does not apply to the French language, which uses the verb aimer both for "to love" and for "to like".

    2. In American films and TV, I often see relatives telling each other "I love you", for example a mother to a daughter, or a grandson to grandfather. In Portugal, I think this is unusual. We would normally say the equivalent of "I like you very much", instead. Do relatives tell each other "I love you" in your language?

    Although I'm particularly interested in Romance languages, I'm leaving the thread open to all languages.
    In Spain we always say "te quiero". I've never heard anybody in Spain (at least in public) say "te amo", but in all the Spanish speaking countries in America they say "te amo".
    And as for relatives we never ever say "te amo", it is always "te quiero". It would sound ridiculous in Spain to say "te amo" to your mother or to your grandfather.

  3. #3
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    I'll try to do it in english, I'm sure it will be wrong, so please fell free to correct me

    Here in Mexico is the most normal thing say "te quiero" to anybody: to your family, friends, anyone!
    "te amo" just to your couple (girl/boyfriend) or close family (is it correct? )
    And we have one more: Me gustas (I like you) when someone is attractive to you, whitout feelings yet...

    Cheers
    We forget 3/4 of who we are in order to be like other people. Arthur Schopenhauer.

  4. #4
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    German:

    "Ich liebe dich" (I love you) is commonly used but also very intimate. "Ich will dich" (I want you) will never be heard, because it sounds a bit haughty, as if you want to bring someone down. A boy normally says "Ich liebe dich" or "Ich mag dich sehr" (I like you very much) to a girl and vice versa. In films, you'll often hear "Du bist süß" (You're sweet) or "Ich find dich süß" (I find you sweet). Like the Spaniards say "me gustas", we also use "Du gefällst mir".

    Italian:

    I believe that in Italian you will rather hear "ti amo" than "ti voglio (bene)". However you should wait for natives.

    French:

    Another way to express one's affection for someone should be "je t'adore", I believe. Again, please wait for natives for confirmation.
    Wer keine großen Dinge vollbringen kann, tue kleine in großem Maße. — Free translation of Napoleon Hill's citation —

  5. #5
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Hi,

    That’s how we say it in Catalan/Valencian, at least in Valencia.

    In most situations, we use the verb “voler” (to want) when we want to say to someone that we love her/him (“Et vull”: literally “I want you”).

    In more private and intimate situations, we can use the verb “estimar” (to love). So, “T’estime” (1) means “I love you”. The restriction in the use of this verb is not so radical as in Spanish (I mean, you can say in public that you “estimar” your parents without sounding melodramatic), but its use is more restricted than, for instance, the French “aimer” (2).

    If we use the verb “agradar” (to like… well, not exactly… if I say ‘You “agradar” me’ I don’t mean ‘You like me’ but ‘I like you’, so "M'agrades": "I like you") we are not necessarily meaning that we are in love. It can be used when you are starting a possible relationship and you don’t want to become too engaged, so, besides its literal meaning, it can also mean “I think I could love you”. However, if you like something, you would never use the verb “estimar” (for instance, we would never use the verb "estimar" in sentences like "j'aime le football", it would be "m'agrada el futbol", never "estime el futbol").

    And, of course, you can find many other expressions or words to express your love to a person.

    (1) “T’estime” is the most common conjugation in Valencia. Other dialects say “T’estim” (Balearic Islands, L’Alguer), “T’estimo” (Catalonia, Northern Valencia, Aragonese Strip, Andorra) or “T’estimi” (Northern Catalonia).

    (2) As far as I know, in Catalonia the verb “estimar” has a more general and common usage than in Valencia.


    Bon 2006! Happy 2006!

  6. #6
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Samaruc
    (2) As far as I know, in Catalonia the verb “estimar” has a more general and common usage than in Valencia.
    Exacte!

    In Central Catalan "to love" (estimar) is used without problems to anyone you love or want: couple, friends, family (t'estimo) (I think is no equivalent of "te amo" or "te quiero" in Spanish...).

    If you don't feel like "estimes" a friend then you can use de verb "apreciar" (t'aprecio molt) or "tenir carinyo" (et tinc molt de carinyo)(castellanada, sí, sí)

    greetings

  7. #7
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Does Catalan not have a verb morphologically analogous to amar, aimer, amare, etc.?
    Deuparth gwaith yw ei ddechrau.

  8. #8
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Outsider
    Does Catalan not have a verb morphologically analogous to amar, aimer, amare, etc.?
    Well, we actually have "amar" as well but it is very-very archaic. I had to check it in the dictionary to be sure.
    We use "estimar". which comes from Latin: "aestimare".
    Last edited by Roi Marphille; 30th December 2005 at 6:11 PM. Reason: more
    I quit. Thanks for all your support! Roi

  9. #9
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roi Marphille
    Well, we actually have "amar" as well but it is very-very archaic. I had to check it in the dictionary to be sure.
    We use "estimar". which comes from Latin: "aestimare".
    Curiously, it has only happened to the verb, because other words sharing the same stem are still alive and haven't been replaced: Amor, amant, amatori, amador, amorós...

    Salut!

  10. #10
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roi Marphille
    Well, we actually have "amar" as well but it is very-very archaic. I had to check it in the dictionary to be sure.
    We use "estimar". which comes from Latin: "aestimare".
    "amar" in Catalan? (que lleig, it sounds really ugly!) When you say it's very-very archaic I suppose you're saying it was extinguished some centuries ago!!

  11. #11
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    In England the use of 'I love you' is very common, publicly or privately. It is used for family members too. My two grown up sons always end their 'phone calls to me by saying 'I love you lots Mum' and I say 'I love you too, darling,'

    I am heterosexual, as are my girlfriends, but when we speak on the 'phone we always say 'lots of love to you' when saying goodbye.

    When it comes to a male/female friendship which shows signs of becoming something more intimate, we say 'I really like being with you', which progresses to 'I'm growing really fond of you'. After that it depends on the personality of each person...........

    Oh to be young again..........and in love.

  12. #12
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by diegodbs
    In Spain we always say "te quiero". I've never heard anybody in Spain (at least in public) say "te amo", but in all the Spanish speaking countries in America they say "te amo".
    And as for relatives we never ever say "te amo", it is always "te quiero". It would sound ridiculous in Spain to say "te amo" to your mother or to your grandfather.
    We say both "te quiero" and "te amo", not just "te amo". Of course "te amo" is more intense, so maybe it is not too often people say it in public

  13. #13
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Outsider
    This is a two-part question:

    1. In Portugal, when a boy wants to tell a girl that he loves her, he's more likely to use the equivalent of "I like you" than the equivalent of "I love you". The verb "to love" tends to be reserved for very intimate moments. You don't hear it very often in public. Judging from some discussions I've read on the Spanish forums, it looks like the same thing occurs in that language: Te quiero ("I want you") is employed instead of Te amo ("I love you"). I'm wondering how it is in other languages, especially Romance languages. Is the verb "to love" commonly employed in public by lovers to express their feelings towards each other, or does it tend to be replaced with another one?

    I know that this question does not apply to the French language, which uses the verb aimer both for "to love" and for "to like".

    2. In American films and TV, I often see relatives telling each other "I love you", for example a mother to a daughter, or a grandson to grandfather. In Portugal, I think this is unusual. We would normally say the equivalent of "I like you very much", instead. Do relatives tell each other "I love you" in your language?

    Although I'm particularly interested in Romance languages, I'm leaving the thread open to all languages.
    HI

    "Te quiero" doesn't exactly mean "I want you", it means "I love you" but you can use it to say that to your boyfriend/girlfriend, friends, relatives etc..., while "te amo", is more intense and we usually say it just to our partner.

    The translation for "I want you" is "te deseo" (I think).


  14. #14
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    In Norwegian there's a translation for both "Te quiero" and "te amo", unlike English that has just "I love you":

    Jer er glad i deg = Te quiero = I love you .
    Jeg elsker deg = Te amo = I love you
    Jeg har lyst på deg = Tengo ganas de ti/te tengo ganas = I want you.
    Jeg bejærer deg = Te deseo = I want you


  15. #15
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by gisele73
    "Te quiero" doesn't exactly mean "I want you", it means "I love you" but you can use it to say that to your boyfriend/girlfriend, friends, relatives etc..., while "te amo", is more intense and we usually say it just to our partner.

    The translation for "I want you" is "te deseo" (I think).
    I know. The translations in my original post were purposefully literal.

    I guess I can rephrase my question as follows:

    1) Does your language have a verb with the specific meaning of "to love" (in the romantic sense)?
    2) Is this verb commonly employed in public, or is it replaced with another one, with a broader meaning?
    3) In which kinds of relationships do you employ the verb "to love"?
    4) If your language is related to Latin, is the verb "to love" etymologically related to amar, aimer, amare, etc.?
    Deuparth gwaith yw ei ddechrau.

  16. #16
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    utsider,

    I have heard Brazilians say "estou apaixonado por vôcé", is it used as saying "I love you"?...because if translated literally it would be something like "I'm infatuated"...do you say the same in portugal or is it only in Brazil?

  17. #17
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    "Apaixonado" is kind of an idiom. It can mean "infatuated", but also "in love", so "Estou apaixonado por você" normally means "I'm in love with you".
    The word "apaixonado" is derived from "paixão", passion. It's employed in Brazil and in Portugal, although in the latter the phrase would be "Estou apaixonado por ti".
    Deuparth gwaith yw ei ddechrau.

  18. #18
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by Outsider
    "Apaixonado" is kind of an idiom. It can mean "infatuated", but also "in love", so "Estou apaixonado por você" normally means "I'm in love with you".
    The word "apaixonado" is derived from "paixão", passion. It's employed in Brazil and in Portugal, although in the latter the phrase would be "Estou apaixonado por ti".
    Brigada Outsider

    I didn't know that in Portugal you say "por ti", like in Spanish.

    The first time I heard (or saw somewhere) "estou apaixonado por..." I thought it was something like I'm in love with you or I love you, but to me it sounded a little weird, because in Spanish it would be "estoy apasionado por ti" and we don't use it in the same way, we would use it only as "infatuated".

    But I love the Portuguese way

    Thanx again and happy New Year!

  19. #19
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Happy New Year, Gisele.
    Deuparth gwaith yw ei ddechrau.

  20. #20
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    Re: All languages: I love you or I want you?

    Quote Originally Posted by gisele73
    In Norwegian there's a translation for both "Te quiero" and "te amo", unlike English that has just "I love you":

    Jerg er glad i deg = Te quiero = I love you
    Jeg elsker deg = Te amo = I love you
    Jeg har lyst på deg = Tengo ganas de ti/te tengo ganas = I want you.
    Jeg begjærer deg = Te deseo = I want you

    Just a tiiiny correction. Godt nyttår!

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