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Thread: I miss you

  1. #1
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    I miss you

    How would I write - 'I miss you' in a romantic way ? Please could someone help me?
    Last edited by Great Brit; 1st July 2006 at 11:58 AM. Reason: wrong title

  2. #2
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    Re: I miss you

    I have no sense how romantic it is, but I've heard said:

    "mi manchi!"

  3. #3
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    Re: I miss you

    Properly I miss you is Mi manchi.

    For example for give a more strong romantic effect you could say..

    I miss you.. like (something)
    I miss you like the air that i breathe (come l'aria che respiro)..

    or you can explain completely your feeling. Sometimes is better.
    Less complications and less misunderstooding.
    ciao

  4. #4
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    Re: I miss you

    Nimrod is right: "Mi manchi" is the most common way.
    You can also say:

    "Sento la tua mancanza"
    "Ho nostalgia di te"

    I'm pretty sure, that if you use the "search" tool, you'll find lots of previous threads about this particular expression.
    Beer is not the answer. Beer is the question. Yes is the answer.

  5. #5
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    Re: I miss you

    how about " just know, I miss you" ? Any ideas?

  6. #6
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    Re: I miss you

    O.k - Thank you !

  7. #7
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    Re: I miss you

    ..Sappi solo che mi manchi.. = Just know, i miss you.

  8. #8
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    Re: I miss you

    and where would I add : "and I'm always thinking of you"

  9. #9
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    Re: I miss you

    Mi manchi e ti penso continuamente (I miss you and I'm always thinking of you).

  10. #10
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    Re: I miss you

    Mostly a clarification of pronoun usage I guess. I want to say "They will miss him the most". My attempt: "Loro lo mancarano il massimo". E' giusto? Grazie in anticipo.

  11. #11
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    Re: I miss you

    The Italian structure works the other way round.

    (lui/lei) Mancherà loro tantissimo.
    Beer is not the answer. Beer is the question. Yes is the answer.

  12. #12
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    Re: I miss you

    This looks more like HE will miss THEM. I thought the action goes with the verb "he misses" would be manchera', and "they miss" would be "mancheranno". If not, I'm going to have to go back to "pronouns 101". Sorry.

  13. #13
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    Re: I miss you

    He will miss them is "Loro mancheranno molto a lui" or "lui sentirà molto la loro mancanza". They will miss him "Mancherà loro tantissimo" or "loro sentiranno moltissimo la sua mancanza".
    The problem, as I wrote before, is that it works exactly the other way round compared to the English "He will miss them" or "They will miss him".
    We express something like "They will feel the lack of him" or "he will feel the lack of them".
    Any clearer?
    Beer is not the answer. Beer is the question. Yes is the answer.

  14. #14
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    Re: I miss you

    LO2W, as you become more familiar with piacere, you will understand mancare better, too.

    To say: I like the books, you must say: Mi piacciono i libri.
    The literal translation of Mi piacciono i libri is The books are pleasing to me.

    To say I miss them, you must say Mi mancano.
    Mancare literally means to lack. Mi mancano is literally They are lacking to me.

    For your sentence, think: They will miss him/He will lack to them.

    Hope that helps.
    That's an L (Lsp)

  15. #15
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    Re: I miss you

    Or even more literally; He will lack from them??Panpan
    corrections always welcomed by .--. .- -. .--. .- -. .--. .- -. .--. .- -. .--. .- -. .--. .- -. .--. .- -. .--. .- -. .--. .- -. .--. .- -.

  16. #16
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    Re: I miss you

    How would you say - "You miss me like a hole in the head" - meaning someone does not miss you at all?

    Thanks.

  17. #17
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    Re: I miss you

    Yes, it seems

  18. #18
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    Re: I miss you

    So how do you say that???

    You miss me like a hole in the head.

  19. #19
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    Re: I miss you

    Hello KittyKat, I think that's an idiom isn't it?
    You can translate it literally "Ti manco come un buco in testa", one would understand the meaning, but that sounds a bit weird in Italian.
    Ciao
    G

  20. #20
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    Re: I miss you

    Hi Grtngs - yes it is an idom. Is there a similar saying in Italian that sounds better or appropriate. In essense trying to say that you are not being missed at all.

    Thanks.

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