Page 8 of 16 FirstFirst ... 678910 ... LastLast
Results 141 to 160 of 307

Thread: Word coincidence between different languages

  1. #141
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Native language
    English, USA
    Posts
    4,776

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Japanese niwa "garden"
    Slovene njiva "(cultivated) field", Russian niva "cornfield", etc.

    Of course, gardens and fields can be very different things, so this isn't necessarily such a good match.

  2. #142
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Taiwan
    Native language
    France - French
    Posts
    160

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    And in many languages, 'ma' or 'mam' will mean "mother"... (or variations of the vowel: Mu, Amu, etc.)
    Relics of our universal "natural" language (if this existas at all), or a trick played my the mothers of old days because "mamamamam" is probably the first sound a baby will ever utter, anywhere in the world? "Listen: he/she called my name!!!!"

  3. #143
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Ankara
    Native language
    Turkish
    Posts
    4,163

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    In Turkish, mother = anne, father = baba.
    Babies learn to say father at first. ;p

  4. #144
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Native language
    English - US, Korean
    Posts
    278

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Hebrew תָּלָה (tala): he hung (something), Korean 달다 (talda): hang by tying/strapping, append (something).
    Even more strikingly, causal dependence ("X depends on Y") can be expressed by these verbs, in the form of "X is hung on Y" in both languages.
    Last edited by trigel; 1st July 2013 at 4:29 AM.

  5. #145
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Istanbul
    Native language
    Turkish
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,468

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Saw this and it occurred to me: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2660879

    http://etymonline.com/index.php?term...wed_in_frame=0

    Abound: early 14c., from Old French abonder "to abound, be abundant, come together in great numbers" (12c.), from Latin abundare "overflow, run over," from Latin ab- "off" (see ab-) + undare "rise in a wave," from unda "water, wave" (see water (n.)). Related: Abounded; abounding.


    Turkic:

    ab: come together, hunt, chase
    on: great number, many ("onlar" meaning "they" comes from this "on". "On" also means "number ten". It also means "to crush"

    So

    abon: come together in great numbers & come together and crush.

    Also

    aban: to try to overpower someone.
    Last edited by ancalimon; 1st July 2013 at 7:07 PM.

  6. #146
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Native language
    English, USA
    Posts
    4,776

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Not a semantic match, but

    English rinse < Fr. rincer < Latin recentiare
    Icelandic hreinsa "cleanse" < hreinn "pure" < Gernanic * xrain-

  7. #147
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Native language
    United States English
    Posts
    1

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages


    I'm new here (this is my first post), but I've been looking around this forum for a long time. This topic particularly sparked my interest because I was just thinking about this a few days ago, so I decided to post my thoughts on it.

    I've noticed a few similarities that don't seem to be connected. For example, Tamil நீ (ni) = you, Mandarin 你 (nǐ) = you
    Also, this is kind of a stretch, but there's Spanish Yo = I and Chinese (Wǒ) = I.
    Even more of a stretch: Chinese has a question particle "ma" (吗), which is attached to the end of a sentence to make it a question. Thus, 你是中国人. (Nǐ shì zhōngguó rén.) = You are a Chinese person,你是中国人吗? (Nǐ shì zhōngguó rén ma?) = Are you a Chinese person?
    In Tamil, there is the tendency to add an - (-aa) suffix to a sentence to make it a question when speaking informally. Thus, உன் பெயர் காயத்ரி. (Un peyar Gaayathri) = Your name is Gayatri. உன் பெயர் காயத்ரியா? (Un peyar Gaayathriyaa?) = Is your name Gayatri?

    I grew up around Tamil in my house (so I understand it), but unfortunately I don't speak it. There is one person here on this post who speaks Tamil (Aruniyan), so if he would be so kind as to correct any mistakes I made...?

    Thanks,
    vishr

  8. #148
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Istanbul
    Native language
    Turkish
    Age
    34
    Posts
    1,468

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Quote Originally Posted by vishr View Post


    Even more of a stretch: Chinese has a question particle "ma" (吗), which is attached to the end of a sentence to make it a question. Thus, 你是中国人. (Nǐ shì zhōngguó rén.) = You are a Chinese person,你是中国人吗? (Nǐ shì zhōngguó rén ma?) = Are you a Chinese person?
    In Tamil, there is the tendency to add an - (-aa) suffix to a sentence to make it a question when speaking informally. Thus, உன் பெயர் காயத்ரி. (Un peyar Gaayathri) = Your name is Gayatri. உன் பெயர் காயத்ரியா? (Un peyar Gaayathriyaa?) = Is your name Gayatri?
    vishr
    Turkic languages also have question particles at the end of sentences like mı, mi, mu, mü ,ma, mo. I guess that could be some really ancient connection. Still since we have no way of knowing this I guess they are coincidences.

  9. #149
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Native language
    Tamil
    Posts
    237

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Quote Originally Posted by vishr View Post

    I'm new here (this is my first post), but I've been looking around this forum for a long time. This topic particularly sparked my interest because I was just thinking about this a few days ago, so I decided to post my thoughts on it.

    I've noticed a few similarities that don't seem to be connected. For example, Tamil நீ (ni) = you, Mandarin 你 (nǐ) = you
    Also, this is kind of a stretch, but there's Spanish Yo = I and Chinese (Wǒ) = I.
    Even more of a stretch: Chinese has a question particle "ma" (吗), which is attached to the end of a sentence to make it a question. Thus, 你是中国人. (Nǐ shì zhōngguó rén.) = You are a Chinese person,你是中国人吗? (Nǐ shì zhōngguó rén ma?) = Are you a Chinese person?
    In Tamil, there is the tendency to add an - (-aa) suffix to a sentence to make it a question when speaking informally. Thus, உன் பெயர் காயத்ரி. (Un peyar Gaayathri) = Your name is Gayatri. உன் பெயர் காயத்ரியா? (Un peyar Gaayathriyaa?) = Is your name Gayatri?

    I grew up around Tamil in my house (so I understand it), but unfortunately I don't speak it. There is one person here on this post who speaks Tamil (Aruniyan), so if he would be so kind as to correct any mistakes I made...?

    Thanks,
    vishr
    Dear Vishr,

    Yes, in Tamil, ஆ-aa as suffix for making questions, avanaa? is it him? , appadiyaa? is it so? etc...
    -aa as suffix is also used for negation, for ex.. illaa(without there), varaa(without coming), kaanaa(without seeing).

    The root sound aa(long a) should have a primitive meaning of "unknown" and so has additional meaning of valuable/sacred, as I can see this in many words in other distant languages, in Tamil its used as suffix for questioning and negations.

    Sanskrit has prefix a- for negation.

  10. #150
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Native language
    English - US
    Posts
    23

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Here is one that really amused me the first time I learned of it:

    Japanese: バラバラ (scattered, disconnected)
    Filipino: barabara (haphazard)
    I could never get a Filipino teacher to explain how we came to use this word

  11. #151
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Native language
    Greek
    Posts
    9

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    In modern Greek " ματι " means eye ...['ma·ti ] and it sounds similarly to the Malay/ Indonesian word " mata " with the same meaning !!

  12. #152
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Native language
    Greek
    Posts
    9

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    In Greenlandic " ananara" means mommy...yani annecim...maybe there is a conection...lost in time (-15.000) somewhere in central Siberia...

  13. #153
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Native language
    English, USA
    Posts
    4,776

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Quote Originally Posted by Danae.husak View Post
    In modern Greek " ματι " means eye ...['ma·ti ] and it sounds similarly to the Malay/ Indonesian word " mata " with the same meaning !!
    Interestingly, the Greek word seems (if Wiktionary is reliable) to come from an aphetic form of ommátion < ómma "eye".

    Another pair of false "friends":

    - veto (found in English and many other European languages) is from the 1sg. present form of Lat. vetare "forbid"

    - Finnish veto "pulling"(from the verb vetää "pull") has a range of other physical and metaphorical meanings such as "traction", "strength", etc., and it doesn't seem implausible that it could be extended to the meaning "veto" as well (in the sense of "taking ['pulling'] a proposal out of consideration")

  14. #154
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Shenzhen, PRC
    Native language
    Mandarin
    Posts
    47

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    something I remembered:
    1.Japanese perapera, adverb meaning speaking fluently. Something looks like blah blah....
    Japanese has only a r with sound near to l.

    2.Japanese sentence soudesune can mean "I agree/you are right/yes, it is", consists of sou "thus", desu "be" in a polite form, ne interjection.
    While the T'ientsin dialect of Mandarin: 说的是呢, with same meaning and almost the same pronunciation, but formed from:说-say/speak, V的-that/what is Ved, 是-judging verb and can mean "is right" here, 呢-interjection. (Sorry but not very clear about T'ientsin pronunciation)

  15. #155
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Israel
    Native language
    Hebrew
    Age
    21
    Posts
    1,935

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Quote Originally Posted by Gavril View Post
    Interestingly, the Greek word seems (if Wiktionary is reliable) to come from an aphetic form of ommátion < ómma "eye".
    In hebrew the word for eye is עין ayin.
    All the seats are taken in the parliament of fools!

  16. #156
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Netherlands
    Native language
    Frisian, Dutch and Low Saxon
    Posts
    245

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    I used to think that West Frisian faam (pronounciation /fa:m/, Dutch/Frisian names derived from it: Famke/Femke/Fimke, meaning (cute) little girl) was a French loanword (we have many French loanwords) from femme (pronounciation /fam/). In North Frisian, however, they have the form foom and it appears they're both from Old Frisian fāmne.

    Quote Originally Posted by http://taaldacht.nl/2010/09/07/faam/
    Eerst vraag ik uw geduld voor enkele woorden over de herkomst van faam. Want waarom is het in mijn ogen een bijzonder Fries woord? Wel, in de tijd dat er nog Oudgermaans werd gesproken was dit een wijdverbreid woord, maar tegenwoordig is het alleen nog in het Fries te vinden. Het is een kostbaar overblijfsel. Faam komt van Oudfries fāmne ‘jonge vrouw, maagd’. In de zustertalen bestonden Oudsaksisch fêmia ‘jonge vrouw’, Oudengels fǽmne ‘jonge vrouw’ en Oudnoords feima ‘verlegen meisje’. Ze gaan allemaal terug op Oudgermaans *faimnjō ‘herderin’, een vrouwelijke vorm bij een verder niet overgeleverd *faiman ‘herder’. Het woord heeft niets met Latijn fēmina te maken, al is de gelijkenis groot.

    Overigens, hoewel Oudnoords feima is uitgestorven heeft het nog wel geleid tot hedendaags IJslands feiminn ‘verlegen’ (eigenlijk ‘zoals een meisje’) en van daaruit feimni ‘verlegenheid’.
    Quote Originally Posted by Translation
    First I'd like to ask for your patience for some words about the origins of faam; because why do I think it's such a special Frisian word? Well, this was a widely used word when Old Germanic was still spoken, but nowadays it can only be found back in Frisian; it is a valuable remnant. Faam is derived from Old Frisian fāmne ‘young woman, virgin’. In its sister languages there were the forms fêmia (Old Saxon) ‘young woman’, fǽmne (Old English) ‘young woman’ and feima (Old Norse) ‘shy girl’. They're all derived from Old Germanic *faimnjō ‘herdess’, a female form of otherwise not survived *faiman ‘herder’. Even though they look very similar the word is not related to Latin fēmina at all.

    Even though Old Norse feima has gone extinct, it still lives on in present Icelandic feiminn ‘shy’ (actually ‘like a girl’) and from that to feimni ‘shyness’.
    Maybe I should put this on Wiktionary.

  17. #157
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Native language
    italiano
    Posts
    1,160

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Quote Originally Posted by Moro12 View Post
    I am interested in the rare phenomenon of "word coincidence" in different languages.

    What I am specifically looking for is a situation when:

    1. There are two different languages A and B.
    2. The language A has a word M. And the language B has a word N.
    3. The words M and N have identical or close meanings.
    4. The words M and N are pronounced alike. (Not exactly the same, but still pretty "alike" to be recognizable).
    5. M and N are not borrowed from the same source. (M is not borrowed from B; N is not borrowed from A; M and N are not borrowed from the same third language).
    6. M and N are not derived from the same source due to genealogic affinity of A and B languages.
    7. The languages A and B may be completely unrelated linguistically, or may still be allied - that does not matter if conditions 1 to 6 are met.

    I understand there might be very few examples.
    However, the following is the only example I can suggest by myself:

    English: name
    Japanese: 名前 [namae] = "name"

    The words are completely unrelated, as the Japanese 名前 is a compound word with two roots: [na] meaning "name" and [mae] meaning "before, in front of".

    I wonder if somebody could provide more examples.
    Ciao! Confrontando il tema del perfetto latino dell'attuale verbo andare italiano con il corrispondente verbo giapponese 行く , ma dà di che pensare!

    Comunque, consiglio vivamente la lettura di L'Unità d'origine del linguaggio di Alfredo Trombetti. Se non altro per saperne di più.
    Saluti

  18. #158
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Native language
    English, USA
    Posts
    4,776

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    I keep finding/remembering more pairs for this thread:


    English ammo < ammunition< Latin ad- "to" + munitio "fortification"

    Finnish ammukset "ammunition" < plural of ammus "projectile, shell" < ampua "to shoot"

  19. #159
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Beijing/Hong Kong
    Native language
    Mandarin
    Posts
    2,690

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    English: book
    Chinese: 薄 (Cantonese: bok6; Mandarin: bo2)
    Correct my Chinglish please!

  20. #160
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Native language
    French (France)
    Posts
    3,243

    Re: Word coincidence between different languages

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperXW View Post
    English: book
    Chinese: 薄 (Cantonese: bok6; Mandarin: bo2)
    Are you sure this is not a loan word from English?
    According to my dictionary 薄 means “peppermint”, not “book”.

Page 8 of 16 FirstFirst ... 678910 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •