Page 6 of 121 FirstFirst ... 456781656106 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 2418

Thread: All Slavic languages: False friends

  1. #101
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Santa Monica, USA
    Native language
    Bulgaria
    Posts
    10

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Ioan View Post
    " Trus " (in azbuka трус ) in Slovak means " animal's shit " (sorry).
    Quote Originally Posted by cyanista View Post
    Most Russians will have heard that трус doesn't mean 'coward' in Belarusian, it means 'rabbit'. But трусы means both 'rabbits' and 'pants'!
    Funny, in Bulgarian "трус" means "quake"

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Montréal (Québec)
    Native language
    Russian (CCCP)
    Posts
    2,985

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Sophia211 View Post
    Funny, in Bulgarian "трус" means "quake"
    Это также верно и для русского, землетрясение, хотя такое значение призабыто. Но в сочетании "трус и глад" оно ещё встречается у современных писателей, так же, как и в современных православных текстах.

    http://www.pravoslavie.ru/jurnal/040406134930

    А глагол вытрусить - это совершенно современное русское слово, = вытряхнуть всё, до самой мелкого содержания (например, вытрусить мешок, пакет)

    По-украински, трус = перетряска, в том числе, кадровая.

    http://ua.proua.com/news/2006/12/01/181300.html

    За что я люблю болгарский язык, так в первую очередь, что нахожу в нём обилие старинной неизменённой русской лексики, употребляемой современным образом.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Lithuania, K. city
    Native language
    Lithuania Czech
    Posts
    782
    у вас красный живот.(Rus) [u vas krasnyj zhivot] - You have red belly
    U vás je krásný život. (Cze) In your (country or home or...) is beautifull life. :-)

    " Trus " (in azbuka трус ) in Czech (as in Slovak) means " animal's shit " (sorry).
    Last edited by Jana337; 5th September 2007 at 5:19 PM. Reason: merged; please use the edit button instead of posting twice in a row :)
    Su pagarba: 薬屋 (S úctou: kusurija) As I'm too poor in English, please repair my mistakes. Prašau pataisyti, jei ką netiksliai parašiau.

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Brno, Česká republika
    Native language
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Posts
    6,256

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    In Czech stolice means stool, but stolica in Polish and столица in Russian mean capital city. (The word for capital city in Czech is hlavní město = main city).

    Jazyk
    Jazyk

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Native language
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    Age
    27
    Posts
    1,030

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Great topic and really interesting!

    ostatni (pol) = last
    ostatni (cze) = rest (of sth)

    This one always made me laugh:
    nudit se (cze) = to be bored
    nuditi se (cro) = giving yourself

    pravo (cro) = straight or law
    pravo (cze) = right

    hitro (cro) = fast
    chytro (cze) = clever

    šlapka (cro) = deminutive of 'šlapa' which means flip-flop shoes
    šlapka (cze) = prostitute

    dziwka (pol) = bitch
    dívka (cze) = girl

    ako (cro) = if
    ako (slk) = how

    That's it for now

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Montréal (Québec)
    Native language
    Russian (CCCP)
    Posts
    2,985

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by slavic_one View Post
    pravo (cro) = straight or law
    pravo (cze) = right
    Russian has them both, право = law, (на) право = right, (not straight, though, it is прямо). (На)лево - left, and sometimes means cheating, acting around the law.

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Lithuania, K. city
    Native language
    Lithuania Czech
    Posts
    782

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by slavic_one View Post
    Great topic and really interesting!

    ostatni (pol) = last
    ostatní (cze) = rest (of sth, the others)

    ... (... = shortened by my humble person, excuse me)

    pravo (cro) = straight or law
    pravo (cze) = right ("pravo" as simultaneous word is not used, we use "na pravo", "vpravo" and so on. Other word is "právo" - the right(law).

    hitro (cro) = fast
    chytro (cze) = clever (?? clever = chytrý)
    chytro (sk) = fast

    šlapka (cro) = deminutive of 'šlapa' which means flip-flop shoes
    šlapka (cze) = prostitute, (foot) pedal (of bicycle)

    ...

    Some minds to be more clear... Thank You for Your nice minds . K.

    Other theme:

    ошибка [ašipka] = mistake
    a šipka = and arrow
    (..and arrow shows, where is the mistake )..
    Su pagarba: 薬屋 (S úctou: kusurija) As I'm too poor in English, please repair my mistakes. Prašau pataisyti, jei ką netiksliai parašiau.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Native language
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    Age
    27
    Posts
    1,030

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    stan (cro) = flat (apartment)
    stan (cze) = tent

    slovo (cro) = letter
    slovo (cze) = word

    tješiti (se) (cro) = to console
    těšit (se) (cze) = rejoice

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Brno, Česká republika
    Native language
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Posts
    6,256

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    tješiti (se) (cro) = to console
    těšit (se) (cze) = rejoice
    Right, but Czech also has utěšit, to console.

    Jazyk
    Jazyk

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Native language
    Russian/Israel
    Age
    27
    Posts
    476

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Polish and Russian

    zapomnić = to forget
    запомнить = to remember

    obcy = alien
    общий = common

    sklep = shop
    склеп = tomb

    wygodny = comfortable
    выгодный = bargain

    silny = fat, meaty, muscular
    сильный = strong

    duży = big
    дюжий = strong

    mocny = strong
    мощный = mighty (this gives a heroic shade to tales of every day life in Poland... everything is done with all of your might. )

    bohater = hero (as in literature)
    богатырь = big muscular hero with a sword in fairy tales

    pierogi = dumplings
    пироги = cakes

    warzywo = vegetables
    варенье = jam

    but! повидло and powidło mean the same. Although I'm not sure they taste the same... but again that's different for every house.

    Also for some reason Polish doesn't have either "luna" or "mesec" as a word for moon (typical slavic words), polish miesiąc means only "month", never "moon", and the moon is called księżyc... sounds like a... little prince?

    Polish and Czech
    szkoda = (what a) shame
    škoda = national Czech car

  11. #111
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    A bit on the side
    Native language
    Russia/Russian
    Posts
    2,552

    All Slavic languages: False friends

    Hi tkekte!
    Here below are some minor corrections:

    "выгодный" (adjective) = profitable or advantageous. "bargain" (verb or noun) =торговаться, совершать сделку; сделка, (выгодная) покупка

    "пироги" = pies. Cakes are usually sweet (торты, пирожные), "пироги" are not.

    Mod edit: further discussion about пироги has been moved to the Russian forum

    A sword isn't an obligatory weapon of "богатырь". Here is the link to the famous painting "Три богатыря" by Vasnetsov. Добрыня Никитич (left) holds a sword, Илья Муромец - палица (heavy thorned club) and a lance, Алеша Попович - a bow.
    "Если не нравится, как я излагаю - купи себе у Бога копирайт на русский язык!" (с) Б.Г.

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Ljubljana, SI
    Native language
    Slovene, Slovenia
    Posts
    299

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by tkekte View Post
    Polish and Czech
    szkoda = (what a) shame
    škoda = national Czech car
    Your explanation is pretty narrow on this.
    A quick check of the Slavic dictionaries tells that the word škoda (in different spellings) is pretty common around meaning damage, harm, injury, loss

    In Slovene we also have an exclamation "Kakšna škoda!" meaning "what a pity!" -- to have pity with someone/something, not to humiliate someone/something

    And to your knowledge Tkekte, Czech company Škoda (sometime ago it was one of the most important industrial companies in the Austrian-Hungarian empire) was named after Emil Škoda. Well, who knows why some Emil's ancestor got such a surname. There was surely a reason.

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Native language
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    Age
    27
    Posts
    1,030

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by tkekte View Post

    Polish and Czech
    szkoda = (what a) shame
    škoda = national Czech car
    Meaning is same also in Czech!

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Moscow
    Native language
    Russian
    Posts
    9,412

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by tkekte View Post
    but! повидло and powidło mean the same.
    No wonder, it was borrowed from Polish.

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Native language
    Russian/Israel
    Age
    27
    Posts
    476
    Quote Originally Posted by Tolovaj_Mataj View Post
    Your explanation is pretty narrow on this.
    A quick check of the Slavic dictionaries tells that the word škoda (in different spellings) is pretty common around meaning damage, harm, injury, loss

    In Slovene we also have an exclamation "Kakšna škoda!" meaning "what a pity!" -- to have pity with someone/something, not to humiliate someone/something
    I know, it just sounds funny as a car's name. No offense to Czech users intended.

    In Ukraine, there is/was an airplane called Antaeus. That's the greek hero who lost all his power when lifted off the ground...

    This word exists in Russian too, шкода means something like "petty annoyance"/"mischief", something that little children do. There is also шкодник = a kid who causes trouble.

    And to your knowledge Tkekte, Czech company Škoda (sometime ago it was one of the most important industrial companies in the Austrian-Hungarian empire) was named after Emil Škoda. Well, who knows why some Emil's ancestor got such a surname. There was surely a reason.
    Ah, I didn't know that. This gives a new shade to it.

    <...>
    Last edited by cyanista; 18th April 2009 at 8:21 PM. Reason: thread split

  16. #116
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Lithuania, K. city
    Native language
    Lithuania Czech
    Posts
    782

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Hi, Tkete!
    škoda (cze) means damage (and name of car according to Emil Škoda and pity as others wrote)
    And here is one pearl of mistaken translation Cz -> Eng.: Škoda mluvit - Damage to speak. :-D :-D. By the way, how to translate it better?
    Su pagarba: 薬屋 (S úctou: kusurija) As I'm too poor in English, please repair my mistakes. Prašau pataisyti, jei ką netiksliai parašiau.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Native language
    Russian/Israel
    Age
    27
    Posts
    476
    Quote Originally Posted by kusurija View Post
    And here is one pearl of mistaken translation Cz -> Eng.: Škoda mluvit - Damage to speak. :-D :-D. By the way, how to translate it better?
    Eh, I don't know.
    Is it about someone not wanting to tell something because they're too haughty, or because they're ashamed?
    Last edited by cyanista; 18th April 2009 at 8:29 PM. Reason: thread split

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Lithuania, K. city
    Native language
    Lithuania Czech
    Posts
    782

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by tkekte View Post
    Eh, I don't know.
    Is it about someone not wanting to tell something because they're too haughty, or because they're ashamed?
    No, it means something similar as: "Someone/sb is such [something negative], that there is no reason to speak about it, neither" "It is not worth while (neither to speak about) ..." or "It's such little kickshaw, that not needed to speak about" But I'm really so poor in English, that I can't translate/explain it properly. Sorry.
    But no haughtiness nor shame is there.
    Su pagarba: 薬屋 (S úctou: kusurija) As I'm too poor in English, please repair my mistakes. Prašau pataisyti, jei ką netiksliai parašiau.

  19. #119
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Native language
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Posts
    10,624

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Maybe it's a waste of breath?
    Quote Originally Posted by tkekte View Post
    [...]
    silny = fat, meaty, muscular
    сильный = strong
    [...]
    I'm afraid silny doesn't mean what you wrote, tkekte. It may vaguely imply in certain cases someone muscular, but not the first two you've mentioned.
    Silny simply means strong. It's very often synonymous with mocny, which can also mean powerful.


    Quote Originally Posted by tkekte View Post
    [...]
    Also for some reason Polish doesn't have either "luna" or "mesec" as a word for moon (typical slavic words), polish miesiąc means only "month", never "moon", and the moon is called księżyc... sounds like a... little prince?
    [...]
    The word luna exists in Polish too and has two meanings.
    The first one signifies a Roman goddess of moon and is capitalised--Luna.
    The second one means moon, and it's tagged as poetic in PWN. I haven't known this meaning, I must admit, but was curious after I'd read your post whether it was indeed non-existent in Polish. Thanks for spurring me.

    Tom

    EDIT: I've just looked up miesiąc too and it can also mean moon, tagged as poetic too, who'd'a thought? I must say that not many people know that these two words also mean moon, the word we normally use is księżyc.
    Please correct my errors! Thanks.
    Corrigez-moi, s'il vous plaît! Merci.
    Пoжaлуйcтa, иcпpaвьтe мoи oшибки! Бoльшoe cпaсибo.

  20. #120
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Native language
    Russian/Israel
    Age
    27
    Posts
    476

    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Oh sorry, I must have confused silny with something else. Maybe with слаб in Bulgarian. The way I remember it from reading Polish texts (fairytales and such) is "meaty/muscular", but maybe I was reading it wrong.

Page 6 of 121 FirstFirst ... 456781656106 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •