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Thread: All Slavic languages: False friends

  1. #1961
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Encolpius View Post
    Czech šišky type of pastry what Slovaks call (?)
    Slovak šišky type of pastry what Czechs call koblihy
    CZ koblihy = SK šišky = EN doughnuts

    CZ šišky = SK šúľance (?) = EN dumplings, gnocchi (?)
    šiška also means pine cone in both languages but there is a difference in pastry
    It's not used only for pine cones, it may refer to cones of other trees as well.

  2. #1962
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Gnoj View Post
    Usually as f (or unvoiced v like you said)
    You mean before voiceless consonants and at the end of the word?

  3. #1963
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Azori View Post
    ... CZ šišky = SK šúľance (?)...
    I think šúľance is what we are looking for. The English words are useless.
    [ɒkinɛk humorɒ vɒn, mindɛnˤtud, ɒkinɛk niŋʧ, mindɛnrɛ ke.pɛʃ]

  4. #1964
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Azori View Post
    CZ koblihy = SK šišky = EN doughnuts
    CZ šišky = SK šúľance (?) = EN dumplings, gnocchi (?)
    Thanks for your research, Azori.

    Yet, the Czechs with which I was talking about this, don't know šišky in the meaning of the food. Into the bargain, they laughed at "šišky as a food".

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Jamin View Post
    You mean before voiceless consonants and at the end of the word?
    Yes. I always wonder how behaves any other Slavic language when it comes to this difficulty. So I'm curious how the "v" is pronounced at the end of a word or before consonants in general.
    Last edited by vianie; 11th February 2013 at 12:46 AM.

  5. #1965
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Slovene: Pomahaj svoji materi! [wave at your mother] pomahati wave
    Slovak: Pomáhaj svojej materi! [help your mother] pomáhať help
    [ɒkinɛk humorɒ vɒn, mindɛnˤtud, ɒkinɛk niŋʧ, mindɛnrɛ ke.pɛʃ]

  6. #1966
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Encolpius View Post
    Slovene: Pomahaj svoji materi! [wave at your mother] pomahati wave
    Slovak: Pomáhaj svojej materi! [help your mother] pomáhať help
    I'm wondering what words they have for 'help' in Slovene and for 'wave' in Slovak.

    We would say:
    Pomachaj swojej mamie! -- Wave to your mother.
    Pomagaj swojej mamie! -- Help your mother!

    Another similar example in this vein is:
    Bułhakow [Pl]
    Булгаков [Rus]
    Please correct my errors! Thanks.
    Corrigez-moi, s'il vous plaît! Merci.
    Пoжaлуйcтa, иcпpaвьтe мoи oшибки! Бoльшoe cпaсибo.

  7. #1967
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas1 View Post
    I'm wondering what words they have for 'help' in Slovene and for 'wave' in Slovak.

    We would say:
    Pomachaj swojej mamie! -- Wave to your mother.
    Pomagaj swojej mamie! -- Help your mother!

    Another similar example in this vein is:
    Bułhakow [Pl]
    Булгаков [Rus]
    Slovene help pomagati, Slovak wave zamávať, the v-h change is common in Southern Slavic languages (duhan-duvan, kuhati-kuvati, suho-suvo, uho-uvo....)
    [ɒkinɛk humorɒ vɒn, mindɛnˤtud, ɒkinɛk niŋʧ, mindɛnrɛ ke.pɛʃ]

  8. #1968
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    However the Slovene/BCS h is pronounced like CS ch.

    We already had similar false "false friends" like kruh = kruch and krug = kruh.

  9. #1969
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by bibax View Post
    However the Slovene/BCS h is pronounced like CS ch.

    We already had similar false "false friends" like kruh = kruch and krug = kruh.
    Polish ch is, unlike German or CS, usually more voiced than Polish h. Those Poles have everything reversely...

  10. #1970
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by bibax View Post
    We already had similar false "false friends" like kruh = kruch and krug = kruh.
    What does kruch mean in Czech? I suppose it's an archaism because I never met this word before.

  11. #1971
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Kruch means kus, úlomek (= a piece, fragment), the noun is quite obsolete, but the derived words are common: krušný (= hard/harsh), kruchý (křehký = fragile, brittle), krušiti (= to crush, quite similar word ), zkroušený (= downhearted, disconsolate, crestfallen), Krušné hory (a mountain range in Bohemia);

    N.B. kruch -> kruš-, but kruh (= circle) -> kruž-;

  12. #1972
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Encolpius View Post
    Slovene: Pomahaj svoji materi! [wave at your mother] pomahati wave
    Slovak: Pomáhaj svojej materi! [help your mother] pomáhať help
    Slovene help pomagati, Slovak wave zamávať...
    Slovak: Wave at your mother! = Zakývaj svojej mame!

    Personally, I would not use "zamávaj" here.

  13. #1973
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Czech: plivat - to spit

    BCS: plivati - to swim

  14. #1974
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    It is a similar case like býti (to be) × bíti (to beat), in BCS biti.

    In Czech we have two different verbs plivati and plývati (s-, o-, vy-, roz-). Only the second one is related to the BCS plivati.

  15. #1975
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Polish also has similar pairs:
    plwać -- archaic word meaning spit
    pływać -- swim

    być -- to be
    bić -- beat
    Please correct my errors! Thanks.
    Corrigez-moi, s'il vous plaît! Merci.
    Пoжaлуйcтa, иcпpaвьтe мoи oшибки! Бoльшoe cпaсибo.

  16. #1976
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas1 View Post
    być -- to be
    bić -- beat
    Same in Russian, it represents some difficulty for learners:
    быть - to be
    бить - to hit

    выть - to howl
    вить -to weave

  17. #1977
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Same in Polish
    Quote Originally Posted by rusita preciosa View Post

    выть - to howl
    -- wyć
    вить -to weave
    -- wić
    Please correct my errors! Thanks.
    Corrigez-moi, s'il vous plaît! Merci.
    Пoжaлуйcтa, иcпpaвьтe мoи oшибки! Бoльшoe cпaсибo.

  18. #1978
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    The same in Czech:

    выть - wyć - výti
    вить - wić - víti

    It represents some difficulty for the Czech children:

    Víly vily věnce a psi na ně z vily vyli. = The fairies make (weave) wreaths and the dogs howl on them from the villa.

  19. #1979
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Polish burak > beet, beetroot
    Czech burák > peanut
    [ɒkinɛk humorɒ vɒn, mindɛnˤtud, ɒkinɛk niŋʧ, mindɛnrɛ ke.pɛʃ]

  20. #1980
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    Re: All Slavic languages: False friends

    Quote Originally Posted by bibax View Post
    The same in Czech:

    выть - wyć - výti
    вить - wić - víti

    It represents some difficulty for the Czech children:

    Víly vily věnce a psi na ně z vily vyli. = The fairies make (weave) wreaths and the dogs howl on them from the villa.
    Isn't this sentence in past tense?

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