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Thread: mi raccomando

  1. #21
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    Re: Mi raccomando

    Mi raccomando is an idiom with several meanings:

    to urge (esortare) si raccomandò di non portare animali = she urged us not to bring pets with us

    Mi raccomando, arriva in tempo stasera! = please arrive on time this evening! or you’d better arrive on time this evening!

    Mi raccomando, finisci i compiti! = do finish your homework! or you’d better finish your homework!
    m*an

  2. #22
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    Re: Mi raccomando

    It really is a tough one especially when you're interpreting and need a fast, correct translation. It seems to me that Italian is full of these although I know that other languages have them too. That's one of the reasons that interpreting is often so difficult. One word or short phrase often takes a definition or long phrase in the language to which you are interpreting and some do not really HAVE an adequate translation as they are so cultural..

  3. #23
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    Riferimento: Mi raccomando!

    Vespasian,
    I don't understand either why it is mi raccommando and not ti raccommando. It doesn't make sense that it is reflexive? Mi rompe la testa!
    Carol
    Last edited by ElaineG; 8th January 2007 at 10:03 PM. Reason: Please pay attention to your spelling. Please remember we have many students of English here :).

  4. #24
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    Re: Riferimento: Mi raccomando!

    Quote Originally Posted by audia View Post
    Vespasian,
    I don't understand either why it is mi raccommando and not ti raccommando. It doesent make sense that it is reflexsive?????
    Mi rompe la testa!
    Carol
    I guess this idiom originally was "mi raccomando a te" (be careful: there's only one 'm') where 'raccomandarsi a qualcuno' means 'to entrust oneself to s.o.', because I think the idea was "I entrust all my hopes in you that you are going to be careful/good/to act this or that way/etc." or something like this. Of course it's only a hypothesis, but I think it works, doesn't it?
    Bye!

  5. #25
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Vespasian,
    Your wrote:"For me it's so hard to grasp why it's "Mi raccomando." and not "Ti raccomando.". Does anyone have the same problem?"
    You are not alone. That is precisely my problem with this expression. However, I have just read the message posted by Vikgigio (Thank you, Vik!) and it seems to me to make a lot of sense. Vikgigo's response enables you to 'internalise' the general idea behind this expression rather than associating with it a dozen heterogeneous - and therefore confusing - English expressions.
    Many thanks, Vikgigio.
    Virgilio

  6. #26
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    There are various Italian verbs that are incomprehensibly reflexive for English-speakers. Another example: I congratulate you = mi congratulo con te. There are others that don't come to mind, you just have to learn them.

  7. #27
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    Re: mi raccomando!

    Quote Originally Posted by moki View Post
    please, tomorrow I don't want you to be sad anymore
    OR
    please, tomorrow I don't want to see you (be?) sad
    Actually, "please" sounds a bit wrong in English. I think it's more:

    "I don't want to see you(/you're) still sad tomorrow, okay?"
    or, changing the punctuation at the end to reflect the tone of voice:
    "I don't want to see you(/you're) still sad tomorrow, okay!"

    Alternatively, I "wouldn't bother" to translate "mi raccomando". In certain cases, it is defensible to omit words from one language when translating into another. And not out of desperation (ie because there doesn't appear to be any suitable translation), but because the "pragmatics" (linguistics term) are implicit elsewhere in the (translated) sentence.

  8. #28
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    I agree, Gavin. There are quite a lot of words that I don't always translate, such as "infatti" and "inoltre", because the meaning is clear without them. Your attempt here is a good one.

  9. #29
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Quote Originally Posted by Einstein View Post
    I agree, Gavin. There are quite a lot of words that I don't always translate, such as "infatti" and "inoltre", because the meaning is clear without them. Your attempt here is a good one.
    Thanks. And your example of infatti is perfect. But I'd warn people away from trimming "inoltre": surely, 9 times out of 10, this is translated perfectly comfortably and suitably as one out of the following "also", "in addition", "furthermore", "what is more/what's more" etc. N'est-ce pas?

  10. #30
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    In my head I’ve always translated mi raccomando in imperative expressions as I beg you (which is stronger than a simple please/per favore) and to me it seems to fit perfectly with the 2 examples on this thread:

    Mi raccomando! Domani non voglio più vederti triste I beg you! Tomorrow I do not want to see you still sad.

    Fai attenzione, mi raccomando. I beg you to be careful!

  11. #31
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Quote Originally Posted by mateintwo View Post
    In my head I’ve always translated mi raccomando in imperative expressions as I beg you (which is stronger than a simple please/per favore)
    OK, but "I beg you" is a bit formal in English. You wouldn't normally say this to people in spoken English. Whereas "Mi raccomando!" is a phrase specifically used in everyday, conversational Italian. So your phrase, while accurately translating the meaning, would not work very well as a functional translation. Sorry!

  12. #32
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Quote Originally Posted by GavinW View Post
    OK, but "I beg you" is a bit formal in English. You wouldn't normally say this to people in spoken English. Whereas "Mi raccomando!" is a phrase specifically used in everyday, conversational Italian. So your phrase, while accurately translating the meaning, would not work very well as a functional translation. Sorry!
    I agree..I'd always translate "I beg you!" as "Ti prego!" but not as "Mi raccomando!".

    Brevity is the soul of wit - Le persone intelligenti hanno il dono della concisione

  13. #33
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Well at least in AE I beg you is quite common in verbal speech as a sort of strong please. Probably not as common as mi raccomando in Italian but still common.
    Can some AE speakers confirm this?

    I beg you in a traditional sense when you ask someone to do something for you or to give you something (often for nothing) is quite different than when you just want to emphasize the importance for someone to be careful or similar.

  14. #34
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Gavin, you're right about "inoltre". Forget I said it!

    Another suggestion:
    Spedisci la lettera stasera, mi raccomando!
    Make sure you post the letter this evening! OR Be sure to...

  15. #35
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Quote Originally Posted by Einstein View Post
    Another suggestion:
    Spedisci la lettera stasera, mi raccomando!
    Make sure you post the letter this evening! OR Be sure to...
    Yes, and I'm sure these "solutions", which are more "traditional" translations of the phrase, must also appear in the other threads on this phrase which I'm aware have been posted in this forum in the past... (Which is another way of saying: I bet we're doubling up suggestions and observations which have already appeared in IE!)

  16. #36
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Quote Originally Posted by mateintwo View Post
    Well at least in AE I beg you is quite common in verbal speech as a sort of strong please. Probably not as common as mi raccomando in Italian but still common.
    Can some AE speakers confirm this?

    I beg you in a traditional sense when you ask someone to do something for you or to give you something (often for nothing) is quite different than when you just want to emphasize the importance for someone to be careful or similar.
    I'd give "to beg" more weight than merely a "strong please," and therefore say it's less common. Few daily situations come to mind where beg might be used. It's closer to supplicare, scongiurare to me...
    That's an L (Lsp)

  17. #37
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    I asked for confirmations from AE speakers so I do appreciate your input but I lived 25 years+ in New York and somehow I heard beg used quite often as a strong but polite substitute for ask (or please) in phrases like these:

    I beg you to make sure to send the package today.
    I beg you to drive slowly.
    I beg you to not stay out late/to come home early tonight
    I beg you to try to stop smoking

    And so on

    Main meanings according to Garzanti: Raccomandarsi: v.rifl. to implore (s.o.), to beg (s.o.)

  18. #38
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Quote Originally Posted by mateintwo View Post
    I heard beg used quite often as a strong but polite substitute for ask (or please) in phrases like these:
    I think the main problem is that "mi raccomando" is closer to the idea of encouraging somebody to do something (even if that "something" is a thing which one considers very important for one's own interests), whereas "I beg (you)" is a more direct way of making a (forceful) request.

  19. #39
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    These days, in NYE/AE "I beg you" would only be used in situations where you are either 1) joking or 2) in dire need of something.

    For example, if a cab driver is driving like a lunatic, you might "I beg you, please drive slower or we'll both be killed." Or joking to a loved one, "please, I beg you, no more singing in the shower, I can't take it anymore!"

    Real pleading and urgency is communicated by "I beg you", and I don't think it is by "mi raccommando."
    PANDAmonium (noun): What happens when posters don't use capital letters and punctuation!

  20. #40
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    Re: Mi raccomando!

    Mate, I don't know when that 25 years was, in what circles you traveled or in what contexts you heard or remember hearing it. You asked for AE opinions and then discount them. As ElaineG said, oggi come oggi it means a whole lot more than it did as you seem to have experienced it.
    That's an L (Lsp)

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