Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 95

Thread: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Reykjavík, Ísland
    Native language
    UK English
    Posts
    18,506

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by merquiades View Post
    I don't really hear /ç/ in "heat" but maybe that's just me.
    It's definitely there. Not many people do because of the nature of the switch. It's an allophonic variant and the whole reason we can call it allophonic is that it's generally below the level of consciousness and quite conditioned. It's completely normal for a lot of people to pick up on it, not some defect of your own. Before studying phonetics, I would not have been able to hear it either.

    Try repeating the names "Howard" and "Hugh" and focus on where the initial sound is coming from in Hugh. Try to use that sound in "Howard", you'll hear how absolutely weird/wrong it sounds, which should be illustrative of the difference You should realise that the front vowel has dragged that original [h] so far forward it's not even in a place compatible to start pronouncing the name Howard. You need to pull it significantly further back to start saying Howard. This is the distinction.
    Last edited by berndf; 20th November 2012 at 8:12 PM. Reason: Quote tag

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Alxmrphi View Post
    It's definitely there. Not many people do because of the nature of the switch. It's an allophonic variant and the whole reason we can call it allophonic is that it's generally below the level of consciousness and quite conditioned. It's completely normal for a lot of people to pick up on it, not some defect of your own. Before studying phonetics, I would not have been able to hear it either.

    Try repeating the names "Howard" and "Hugh" and focus on where the initial sound is coming from in Hugh. Try to use that sound in "Howard", you'll hear how absolutely weird/wrong it sounds, which should be illustrative of the difference You should realise that the front vowel has dragged that original [h] so far forward it's not even in a place compatible to start pronouncing the name Howard. You need to pull it significantly further back to start saying Howard. This is the distinction.
    I am not so sure. I hear a sound that would qualify as a phonemic /ç/ in my language, that has phonemic distinction between the sounds, in the pronunciation of human but not in the pronunciation of heat.

    This is how the fictitious words hiet and chiet would sound in German hiet-chiet.mp3. To me, the recording of heat is definitely closer to the former.
    Last edited by berndf; 20th November 2012 at 8:47 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Reykjavík, Ísland
    Native language
    UK English
    Posts
    18,506

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    I am not so sure. I hear a sound that would qualify as a phonemic /ç/ in my language, that has phonemic distinction between the sounds, in the pronunciation of human but not inthe pronunciation of heat.
    I see what you mean. It's definitely there in hju- clusters but less 'strictly' with forwarded vowels. I can say heat with a forwarded version [ç] and also not that far forward (but much more forward than [h]) and I am not sure which one I would choose in casual speech, probably a mixture of them both. I admit I was less focused on labelling it phonetically but more trying to show a forward/back distinction based on the following vowel, which the earlier posted indicated by not being able to hear a difference.

    Oh my, I thought the earlier poster said they couldn't hear it in human and not heat. My bad.
    So many h-words floating around .

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Native language
    German & AmE
    Age
    22
    Posts
    535

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by merquiades View Post
    JuanEscritor, listening to your recordings, I don't think you pronounce the /h/ any differently than I do. I don't really hear /ç/ in "heat" but maybe that's just me.

    Youngfun. I think in the second recording you say /çuman/. Your pronunciation seems great to me! Your /h/ is bit stronger than I would pronounce it.
    German has this sound, so I'm used to hearing it, but what Youngfun pronounces there is not really a /ç/, at least not a very strong one.
    Here's my recording: http://vocaroo.com/i/s0NfHmYBJ1KW
    The first one is human with normal H, the second with a /ç/. Try and compare. German actually has three of these similar sounds, so here's a recording of the three different sounds, for you to compare:
    http://vocaroo.com/i/s0b3JcVXtOzp
    1) ich /ɪç/
    2) hab' /ˈhaːb/
    3) mach /ˈmaχ/

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    City of Brotherly Love
    Native language
    USA Northeast
    Posts
    2,758

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Roy776 View Post
    German has this sound, so I'm used to hearing it, but what Youngfun pronounces there is not really a /ç/, at least not a very strong one.
    Here's my recording: http://vocaroo.com/i/s0NfHmYBJ1KW
    The first one is human with normal H, the second with a /ç/. Try and compare. German actually has three of these similar sounds, so here's a recording of the three different sounds, for you to compare:
    http://vocaroo.com/i/s0b3JcVXtOzp
    1) ich /ɪç/
    2) hab' /ˈhaːb/
    3) mach /ˈmaχ/
    Thanks Roy. I can distinguish these sounds in German, no problem. /ç/ is almost like an sh- sound in "ich". I just don't hear them in English. /çi:t/ for heat with that sound seems bizarre. In "human" I can see the palatizing effect more easily but still not to the point of /çuman/ with the German sound.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Native language
    German & AmE
    Age
    22
    Posts
    535

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by merquiades View Post
    Thanks Roy. I can distinguish these sounds in German, no problem. /ç/ is almost like an sh- sound in "ich". I just don't hear them in English. /çi:t/ for heat with that sound seems bizarre. In "human" I can see the palatizing effect more easily but still not to the point of /çuman/ with the German sound.
    I agree. /çi:t/ sounds completely wrong to my ears, /çuman/ not so much. I notice a slight difference in my pronunciation of human when it is preceded by a word ending in t, but it's not a /ç/. It reminds me more of Czech Ť, merging T and U to a certain extent, but even that is not an accurate description.
    This topic has now actually made me unsure about my pronunciation I normally pronounce it with a silent h, thus starting with u as in universe. Could this assumed /ç/ pronunciation maybe stem from a silent H consonant at the beginning?
    Last edited by Roy776; 20th November 2012 at 11:38 PM.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    City of Brotherly Love
    Native language
    USA Northeast
    Posts
    2,758

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Czech Ť, merging T and U to a certain extent isn't /tju/? Or maybe I'm trying to acquaint it with Russian soft t followed by a soft vowel.... Russian has no /h/ but /x/ before e/i moves forward a bit but it's not /ç/ either. Now I'm trying to figure out just what it is. I think you have to do something in the front of your mouth in German with /ç/ like smile a little bit, no?

    A lot of people say /ju:man/ without the /h/ as in "a yuman being" particularly in the Northeast.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Native language
    German & AmE
    Age
    22
    Posts
    535

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by merquiades View Post
    Czech Ť, merging T and U to a certain extent isn't /tju/? Or maybe I'm trying to acquaint it with Russian soft t followed by a soft vowel.... Russian has no /h/ but /x/ before e/i moves forward a bit but it's not /ç/ either. Now I'm trying to figure out just what it is. I think you have to do something in the front of your mouth in German with /ç/ like smile a little bit, no?

    A lot of people say /ju:man/ without the /h/ as in "a yuman being" particularly in the Northeast.
    Czech Ť is a T with a J directly following it, so you wouldn't pronounce Ťu like the Spanish 'tú', but more like the 'tue' in 'tuesday'.

    EDIT:
    I've just checked Wiktionary on the word human and it provides us with the following pronunciations:
    /ˈçjuː.mən̩/ and /ˈhjuː.mən̩/
    (NY, some other US dialects) IPA: /ˈjuː.mən̩/

    So my pronunciation of 'human' seems to match the one of the NY dialect. And, who would've thought, the word human indeed contains a /ç/! Now the question remains how trustworthy Wiktionary really is.

    Furthermore, the English Wikipedia article on English phonology doesn't list it under consonants, but the German one does.
    /ç/: z. B. hue, Reich, Gemuetlichkeit. In fast allen Mundarten aus Vereinfachung von /hju:/ zu /ç(j)u:/ entstanden (in den übrigen Mundarten /hju:/ oder /ju:/). Tritt außerdem in Fremdwörtern auf (meist aber als [k] ausgesprochen).
    Last edited by Roy776; 21st November 2012 at 3:35 AM.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Native language
    English - AE
    Posts
    629

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Youngfun View Post
    I would like to let you listen a recording I made recently, where I read the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in English.
    Recording 1
    Recording 2
    There aren't many word with "h", but the word "human" appears twice, then the last word is "brotherhood" (in which I pronounce the h)
    Cause I can't distinguish the sounds [h] and [ç], would you analyse my speech, and tell me which sound I actually pronounce?
    Thank you very much.
    Yes, human in recording 2 is very different than how I say it; I don't here a glide [j] between the [ç] and [u] in your recording.

    I'll have to listen to the rest of it later and see what other interesting things there are.

    Thanks for uploading these by the way!

    JE

    ABE: The second instance of human doesn't sound like it uses [ç] at all; just [h].
    Last edited by JuanEscritor; 21st November 2012 at 5:05 AM.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Pekino, Ĉinujo
    Native language
    Chinese/Italian - bilingual
    Age
    24
    Posts
    1,532

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by JuanEscritor View Post
    Yes, human in recording 2 is very different than how I say it; I don't here a glide [j] between the [ç] and [u] in your recording.

    I'll have to listen to the rest of it later and see what other interesting things there are.

    Thanks for uploading these by the way!

    JE
    So, do you think I'm saying [çuman]?

    Thanks everybody for comments about my recording.
    I listened to Roy's recording of the German [ç], and it sounds like something between h and sh, maybe approaching Chinese [ɕ] (their IPA symbol are also similar)... but I don't think it's the same as how I pronounce the h in human.

    And Roy, yes, I think you pronounce human with silent h . I also used to pronounce words like human and humid with a silent h (as most Italian also do), but one of my English teachers (who wasn't a native but Ucrainian) didn't understand me at first, then when he understood he taught to pronounce with h.

    Many of you say I pronounce the H stronger than natives, is it possibile that I pronounce a [x] instead of [h]?
    "Ĉokolado". Do you know how to say "chócoleit" in "Espanis"?

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Native language
    German & AmE
    Age
    22
    Posts
    535

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Youngfun View Post
    So, do you think I'm saying [çuman]?

    Thanks everybody for comments about my recording.
    I listened to Roy's recording of the German [ç], and it sounds like something between h and sh, maybe approaching Chinese [ɕ] (their IPA symbol are also similar)... but I don't think it's the same as how I pronounce the h in human.

    And Roy, yes, I think you pronounce human with silent h . I also used to pronounce words like human and humid with a silent h (as most Italian also do), but one of my English teachers (who wasn't a native but Ucrainian) didn't understand me at first, then when he understood he taught to pronounce with h.

    Many of you say I pronounce the H stronger than natives, is it possibile that I pronounce a [x] instead of [h]?
    [ɕ] is the sound closest to the German [ç], yes I know many pages that compare the Polish [ɕ] (ś) with German [ç]. It is not a real sh, but you're right in saying that its sound gets pretty close to one.

    What you pronounced there is definitely not a real [ç], but it's also not a normal [h]. And for a [x], the sound sounds way too soft. If you ask me, it could perhaps be this phoneme [ɦ], which I know from Dutch. Some people I know say it resembles the sound of a an [x], just softer.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    City of Brotherly Love
    Native language
    USA Northeast
    Posts
    2,758

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Youngfun View Post
    So, do you think I'm saying [çuman]?

    Thanks everybody for comments about my recording.
    I listened to Roy's recording of the German [ç], and it sounds like something between h and sh, maybe approaching Chinese [ɕ] (their IPA symbol are also similar)... but I don't think it's the same as how I pronounce the h in human.

    And Roy, yes, I think you pronounce human with silent h . I also used to pronounce words like human and humid with a silent h (as most Italian also do), but one of my English teachers (who wasn't a native but Ucrainian) didn't understand me at first, then when he understood he taught to pronounce with h.

    Many of you say I pronounce the H stronger than natives, is it possibile that I pronounce a [x] instead of [h]?
    It crossed my mind that you were pronouncing /x/, Francesco, but then I ruled it out. It just sounds like you are trying really hard to give importance to the /h/, stress it and make it heard. People who have h-less languages tend to do that. They also have teachers at school that really push it. I knew a Ukrainian lady who got angry at some anglophones for pronouncing the /h/ too soft. She said she couldn't hear the "h's" and her teachers back in Ukraine had said it had to be a very important audible sound. It's usually a weak sound, like an aspiration, in English. I pronounce it in human but don't in words like have, him, her, he, here.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    US
    Native language
    US English
    Posts
    1,395

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by merquiades View Post
    /h/ ... I pronounce it in human but don't in words like have, him, her, he, here.
    I wonder how literally you mean this. There are well-known weak forms involving some of these words, for ex.,
    "I can see him" -> "I c'n see'im"
    but do you really pronounce "over here" as "over ear", even in informal speech? "Her book is on the table" as "Er book ..."? Do you say, "I was talking to 'im, not 'er"?

    Admittedly the h-words are contrastively stressed in the last example; but not in the first two. And more importantly, compare the words above to "hour" and "honor". These words have no /h/ no matter how strongly stressed they are. I'm concerned that when you say categorically, "I don't pronounce the /h/ in 'here', etc" you are suggesting to our non-NS readers that "here", etc are words like "hour".

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Pekino, Ĉinujo
    Native language
    Chinese/Italian - bilingual
    Age
    24
    Posts
    1,532

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Roy776 View Post
    If you ask me, it could perhaps be this phoneme [ɦ], which I know from Dutch.
    Well, I don't think it is a [ɦ] either, which is a voiced glottal fricative, i.e. the voiced version of [h]. I think the aspirated sounds should be mostly voiceless. At least, this [ɦ] doesn't sound aspirate to me.
    I know because this phoneme exists in my native Chinese dialect, distinct from /h/.
    According to Wikipedia, in RP is an allophone of intervocalic /h/.

    Quote Originally Posted by merquiades View Post
    It crossed my mind that you were pronouncing /x/, Francesco, but then I ruled it out. It just sounds like you are trying really hard to give importance to the /h/, stress it and make it heard. People who have h-less languages tend to do that. They also have teachers at school that really push it. I knew a Ukrainian lady who got angry at some anglophones for pronouncing the /h/ too soft. She said she couldn't hear the "h's" and her teachers back in Ukraine had said it had to be a very important audible sound. It's usually a weak sound, like an aspiration, in English. I pronounce it in human but don't in words like have, him, her, he, here.
    Maybe you are right. In Italy a lot of people even pronounce "I'm" as /haim/ for hypercorrection.
    It's true that when speaking English I always pronouce a quite strong /h/ to make it heard.
    But as I said above, /h/ is a sound that exists in my native dialect, and perhaps even being the same phoneme, it could be pronounced slightly differently.
    Another difficulty is that in my native dialect, /h/ never appears in front of /i/ or /jV/, that makes the pronunciation quite difficult for me.

    When I speak Mandarin Chinese, I probably pronounce a [h] which is the sound of my native dialect, instead of the Standard Mandarin sound /x/. I've notived that when saying some words, such as the famous ni hao in casual speech, sometimes I would pronounce it as [niɦao~ni.ao]. I've noticed that my dad also makes a lot this reduction.
    Probably it's unversal that the /h/ sounds gets weakened or disappears in, indeed, "weak forms".
    But Northern people that speak more Standard Mandarin with /x/ sound never do these kinds of reduction.
    "Ĉokolado". Do you know how to say "chócoleit" in "Espanis"?

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    A bit of background information:

    In West-Germanic, [x] and [ç] were originally allophonic variants of /h/. [h] was the realization at the beginning of a syllable and [x] or [ç] at the end of a syllable. This is why "gh" in English and "ch" in German and Scots (in Scots it exists of course but then represents a palatalized "k" //) never occurs at the beginning of a word (except for foreign words).

    Perception of initial /h/ as [
    ç] in in front of certain vowels and consonants seems to have existed already in old West-Germanic languages: Old-Franconian names are often spelled in Latin with initial CH- where etymologically H- would be expected. An example where /hi-/ or /hɪ-/ was obviously perceived as [çi-] of [çɪ-] is the name of the Merovingian king Childeric (Inscription on his signet ring:CHILDERICI REGIS). The name contains the root hild- or hilt- = fight.

    Syllable final /h/ was and and in many languages and dialects still is realized as [x] with variant [ç] depending on the preceding sound. Dutch & Swiss German never do this, Austrian and Bavarian only in after /i/, Standard German after /i:/, /ɪ/, /e/, /ɛ/, /ɛ:/ and all consonants, some dialects of Scots after /i/ or /ɪ/ (it's a bricht moonlicht nicht, the nicht).

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Youngfun View Post
    Well, I don't think it is a [ɦ] either, which is a voiced glottal fricative, i.e. the voiced version of [h]. I think the aspirated sounds should be mostly voiceless. At least, this [ɦ] doesn't sound aspirate to me.
    The /h/ in front of /i/ "blends" into the vowel which it doesn't do in front of /j/. You could describe this is a transition [çɦi-] with a very short and faint [ç] component. You can check this by saying heat and human and touching your larynx with thumb and index finger. You will feel the vibration caused by voicing more or less right away while you will notice a delay when saying human.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Native language
    English - AE
    Posts
    629

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    It does sound somewhat [x]-like, which makes sense, because without the [j], the sound might easily assimilate to the back vowel /u/ and so become [x] instead of [ç].

    As for [ɦ], I think it's presence is unrelated to [ç] and [x]; it typically shows up intervocalically in English: behind → ~[bəɦɑɪnd].

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    City of Brotherly Love
    Native language
    USA Northeast
    Posts
    2,758

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan2 View Post
    I wonder how literally you mean this. There are well-known weak forms involving some of these words, for ex.,
    "I can see him" -> "I c'n see'im"
    but do you really pronounce "over here" as "over ear", even in informal speech? "Her book is on the table" as "Er book ..."? Do you say, "I was talking to 'im, not 'er"?

    Admittedly the h-words are contrastively stressed in the last example; but not in the first two. And more importantly, compare the words above to "hour" and "honor". These words have no /h/ no matter how strongly stressed they are. I'm concerned that when you say categorically, "I don't pronounce the /h/ in 'here', etc" you are suggesting to our non-NS readers that "here", etc are words like "hour".
    I was only thinking of cases when I don't pronounce "h" when I wrote the message. I didn't mean to sound categorical. Perhaps I should have added "often". I'm certainly not advising dropping "h's" either. I don't advocate any pronunciation actually. I link words with "h" like the ones I suggested to the preceding word and don't pronounce it. Even if I don't make the contraction I say "I 'ave a book" probably not "over ear". If I'm stressing the "h" or it's at the beginning of the word I do usually pronounce it, so I wouldn't say "er book" or "ee is" or "ave a nice day".


    Quote Originally Posted by Youngfun
    Maybe you are right. In Italy a lot of people even pronounce "I'm" as /haim/ for hypercorrection.
    It's true that when speaking English I always pronouce a quite strong /h/ to make it heard.
    But as I said above, /h/ is a sound that exists in my native dialect, and perhaps even being the same phoneme, it could be pronounced slightly differently.
    Another difficulty is that in my native dialect, /h/ never appears in front of /i/ or /jV/, that makes the pronunciation quite difficult for me.

    When I speak Mandarin Chinese, I probably pronounce a [h] which is the sound of my native dialect, instead of the Standard Mandarin sound /x/. I've notived that when saying some words, such as the famous ni hao in casual speech, sometimes I would pronounce it as [niɦao~ni.ao]. I've noticed that my dad also makes a lot this reduction.
    Probably it's unversal that the /h/ sounds gets weakened or disappears in, indeed, "weak forms".
    But Northern people that speak more Standard Mandarin with /x/ sound never do these kinds of reduction.
    Yes, I hear those hypercorrections all the time in France. "High hunderstand" is frequent. High school teachers really stress the "h" so students fear not pronouncing something important but curiously enough these teachers forget to teach distinguishing "it, eat" or "seat, sit, set", the vowel of "look as opposed to Luke" or other things like linking words together, question/declaration intonation, stressed-time rhythm etc. For me "think versus sink" is also important. In my list of do's and don't's "h" is at the bottom of the priorities.

    I hear a Chinese class going on from afar every day. The teacher is from Beijing. I noticed there were lots of /x/ and /r/ sounds. She says a lot of "Woah sure".
    Last edited by merquiades; 21st November 2012 at 8:18 PM.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Pekino, Ĉinujo
    Native language
    Chinese/Italian - bilingual
    Age
    24
    Posts
    1,532

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Quote Originally Posted by berndf View Post
    The /h/ in front of /i/ "blends" into the vowel which it doesn't do in front of /j/. You could describe this is a transition [çɦi-] with a very short and faint [ç] component. You can check this by saying heat and human and touching your larynx with thumb and index finger. You will feel the vibration caused by voicing more or less right away while you will notice a delay when saying human.
    When I try to say hhhhhhhhh, I don't feel any vibration, but when I say /hi/ or /hju/ I can feel a little.

    Quote Originally Posted by merquiades View Post
    Yes, I hear those hypercorrections all the time in France. "High hunderstand" is frequent. High school teachers really stress the "h" so students fear not pronouncing something important but curiously enough these teachers forget to teach distinguishing "it, eat" or "seat, sit, set", the vowel of "look as opposed to Luke" or other things like linking words together, question/declaration intonation, stressed-time rhythm etc. For me "think versus sink" is also important. In my list of do's and don't's "h" is at the bottom of the priorities.
    I learnt none of the things you said at school, but as self-taught, with a lot of conversation and listenings, and English courses outside school more focused on oral practice.
    It's just strange that "th" becomes s/z in some countries like China, France and Germany, but t/d in others like Italy.
    What seems strange to most people, is that actually taking some English courses in China helped me improve my pronuciation, not only my Italian accent got milder (maybe acquired a light Chinese accent?), but I would ask myself: why I pronounce the th as "t", but they pronounce it as "s"? Then I learned that the proper pronounciation of th is neither of two, but like something between "s" and "t".
    In China they teach us to pronounce a "s" but with the tongue out of the teeth.
    Recently I saw a research that says that listening to various foreign accents of English helps to improve the pronunciation, from my experience I can say it's true.

    Quote Originally Posted by merquiades View Post
    I hear a Chinese class going on from afar every day. The teacher is from Beijing. I noticed there were lots of /x/ and /r/ sounds. She says a lot of "Woah sure".
    "Woah sure" should be 我是 /wɔ ʂɨ˞ / = I am. The r's you hear should be [ɻ~ʐ], especially in syllable coda it's used the [ɻ] that blends together with the vowel, which sounds like a Texan r.
    My pronunciation, influenced by my native Southern dialect, should use [h] instead of /x/, and [z] instead of the initial r's, and weaker (if not at all) "r-colouring".
    "Ĉokolado". Do you know how to say "chócoleit" in "Espanis"?

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: English: Modification of /h/ in front of certain vowels

    Moderator note: Please keep focused on the topic. We are talking about /h/ here.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •