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Thread: Norwegian: Christmas terms

  1. #21
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Cerb View Post
    Rice porridge served like that is a very common Christmas dish in Norway. If not a tradition, lille julaften (or any of the days preceeding Christmas Eve), is a good candidate for an easy dish like this
    Rice porridge is also a main ingredient of the dessert "Riskrem" that's often served after Christmas dinner, at least in my part of the country.

  2. #22
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by NorwegianNYC View Post
    Hi - it is not what English speaking countries refer to as a bank holiday, but the time period Dec 23 - Jan 2 is essentially one long holiday. Norwegians do not celebrate Christmas per se. "Jul" is a 13-day period of varying degrees of celebrations. It stems from "jól" which was one of the months of the ancient pagan calendar.
    Is it common for a lot of companies in Norway to shut down completely during this 13 day period?
    Vær snill og rett feilene mine (Please correct my mistakes)

  3. #23
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Grefsen View Post
    Is it common for a lot of companies in Norway to shut down completely during this 13 day period?
    No, not anymore. The period from Dec 13 (St. Lucia) until Jan 6 (Epiphany, Holy Three Kings, Twelfth Night) was the old, pre-Christian month of jól. This was not a long holiday period, but a calendar month. Very little work could be done at this time of year, due to the dwindling hours of daylight. The actual celebration did not start until Dec 23/24, and there were twelve days of Christmas - ending Jan 6. Nowadays, it is in essence over by Jan 1, and many smaller companies shut down for the entire period.

  4. #24
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by NorwegianNYC View Post
    Dec 21: Tomasdagen/Tomasmesse
    Dec 22: Vintersolverv
    Dec 23: Lillejulaften
    Dec 24: Julaften
    Dec 25: 1.(første) juledag/Juledagen
    Dec 26: 2.(andre) juledag/Stefansdagen/Staffansdagen

    Dec 27: 3.(tredje) juledag
    Dec 28: 4.(fjerde) juledag/Barnedagen
    Dec 29: 5.(femte) juledag
    Dec 30: 6.(sjette) juledag
    Dec 31: Nyttårsaften
    Jan 1: 1.(første) nyttårsdag/Nyttårsdagen
    Jan 2: 2.(andre) nyttårsdag

    ...
    Jan 5: Helligtrekongersaften/Tolvtedagen
    Jan 6: Trettende dag jul/Trettendedagen/Helligtrekongersdag

    Yuletide in Norway lasts from Dec 23 until Jan 6
    Are the only officially recognized Norwegian holidays during this Yuletide period December 25-26 and January 1-2?
    Vær snill og rett feilene mine (Please correct my mistakes)

  5. #25
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Grefsen View Post
    Are the only officially recognized Norwegian holidays during this Yuletide period December 25-26 and January 1-2?
    Official holidays are Dec 25-26 and Jan 1. However, Dec 24 and Dec 27-31 are semi-holidays. Stores have different hours and many offices and companies are closed. Jan 2 depends on what day of the week it falls. For this upcoming Christmas it is on a Tuesday, and will probably be a regular day.

  6. #26
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Tusen takk for det NorwegianNYC!
    Quote Originally Posted by NorwegianNYC View Post
    Official holidays are Dec 25-26 and Jan 1. However, Dec 24 and Dec 27-31 are semi-holidays. Stores have different hours and many offices and companies are closed. Jan 2 depends on what day of the week it falls. For this upcoming Christmas it is on a Tuesday, and will probably be a regular day.
    So would businesses that are closed Dec 27-31 have a sign saying "Stengt på Romjul" or something similar to this?
    Vær snill og rett feilene mine (Please correct my mistakes)

  7. #27
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by NorwegianNYC View Post
    Hi - it is not what English speaking countries refer to as a bank holiday, but the time period Dec 23 - Jan 2 is essentially one long holiday. Norwegians do not celebrate Christmas per se. "Jul" is a 13-day period of varying degrees of celebrations. It stems from "jól" which was one of the months of the ancient pagan calendar.
    Is the "13-day period" you mention Dec. 21st - Jan. 2nd? Is it more common for Norwegians to simply call this time period Jul or is Juletiden the preferred name to use?
    Vær snill og rett feilene mine (Please correct my mistakes)

  8. #28
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    To answer both your questions:

    - It will say Stengt i romjula
    - The 13 day period is actually Dec 23/24 - Jan 6. It is simply called jul (usually Feminine (jula), but can also be Masculine (julen))

  9. #29
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by NorwegianNYC View Post
    To answer both your questions:

    - It will say Stengt i romjula
    - The 13 day period is actually Dec 23/24 - Jan 6. It is simply called jul (usually Feminine (jula), but can also be Masculine (julen))
    Tusen takk for det NorwegianNYC!

    Would the following be an appropriate greeting to send to a group of Norwegian friends?

    God romjul allesammen!
    Vær snill og rett feilene mine (Please correct my mistakes)

  10. #30
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Grefsen View Post
    Tusen takk for det NorwegianNYC!

    Would the following be an appropriate greeting to send to a group of Norwegian friends?

    God romjul allesammen!
    "God jul (and at this point in romjula) og godt nyttår" is more common. If you're sending a card or talking to someone you don't expect to see for a while you could use both at any point in the same way as in English.

    "Romjul" isn't considered a holiday, it simply refers to the time period as discussed earlier. The days outside the official holidays have normal working hours on paper, but people will typically try to take those days off if their line of work allows it. A business run from an office might simply close for Christmas while a grocery store/supermarket can be expected to keep normal opening hours. Christmas and New Year's Eve are exceptions and tend to be considered official holidays from 13:00-15:00 for most purposes (shops close, overtime pay rates kick in etc.)

  11. #31
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Cerb View Post
    "God jul (and at this point in romjula) og godt nyttår" is more common. If you're sending a card or talking to someone you don't expect to see for a while you could use both at any point in the same way as in English.

    "Romjul" isn't considered a holiday, it simply refers to the time period as discussed earlier. The days outside the official holidays have normal working hours on paper, but people will typically try to take those days off if their line of work allows it. A business run from an office might simply close for Christmas while a grocery store/supermarket can be expected to keep normal opening hours. Christmas and New Year's Eve are exceptions and tend to be considered official holidays from 13:00-15:00 for most purposes (shops close, overtime pay rates kick in etc.)
    Hi Cerb,
    You are absolutely correct, but I would like to add a little to you explanantion. During romjul, most stores will run on special hours (grocery stores included), some stores will not be open at all, most offices will be closed (or very short on staff) and smaller, privately owned businesses will most likely be closed. Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve have never been offical holidays in Norway, but are usually treated as a sort of customary holiday. There might be local ordinances regulating the opening hours on such days, but mostly it happens through customary and mutual understanding.

  12. #32
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    Re: Norwegian: Christmas terms

    Quote Originally Posted by NorwegianNYC View Post
    Hi Cerb,
    During romjul, most stores will run on special hours (grocery stores included), some stores will not be open at all, most offices will be closed (or very short on staff) and smaller, privately owned businesses will most likely be closed.
    My experience is that this is increasingly not the case anymore. At least here in Oslo, there's a definite trend towards regular opening hours in romjula. Almost all the stores, department stores and such around where I live run regular hours during romjulsdagene, and I also know quite a few offices that does this now.

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