Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: In aliquot terms

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Native language
    Slovak
    Posts
    100

    In aliquot terms

    Hello, I was wondering whether the word aliquotly could be expressed in a more "poetic" sence, for instance

    in aliquot terms
    in an aliquot manner

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    North Adams, MA
    Native language
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    Age
    73
    Posts
    11,128

    Re: In aliquot terms

    My OED does not accept your adverbial form. I doubt that any (non-mathematician) AE speaker would have the slightest acquaintance with the word in any form.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    English UK
    Posts
    36,406

    Re: In aliquot terms

    Hi Allaster

    I agree with cyber....

    Can you tell us more about the context in which you want to use the word "aliquot"?
    In these shoes?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    California
    Native language
    English - US
    Posts
    54,532

    Re: In aliquot terms

    Hello Allaster,

    In isolation, those seem strange to me. Please give us a complete sentence in which you would like to use such a phrase.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    This septic isle!
    Native language
    NW Englandish English
    Age
    50
    Posts
    28,689

    Re: In aliquot terms

    I agree with Cyber and Loob: I've no idea what it means.
    Edit yourself ~ its less embarassing than someone else doing it for you,

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    UK
    Native language
    English - England
    Posts
    24,395

    Re: In aliquot terms

    I think it would help tremendously if you gave us your proposed sentence.
    "There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn't."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
    Native language
    English - US
    Posts
    11,083

    Re: In aliquot terms

    Quote Originally Posted by ewie View Post
    I agree with Cyber and Loob: I've no idea what it means.
    I looked it up and I still have only the vaguest idea what it means. I am dying to see it in a sentence, though.
    "If you take hyphens seriously, you will surely go mad" - Oxford University Press style manual

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Native language
    Slovak
    Posts
    100

    Re: In aliquot terms

    Thank you for your answers,

    As far as I know aliquot means corresponding to ones share of something


    I would like to use the word in the following situtation:

    Person A bought a company and the company makes profit, person A is thus entitled to 100% of the profit, then this person A sold a 30% share to person B. Although person B is not a 100% shareholder of the company, it has, aliquotly/in aliquot terms/? the same rights as person A used to have, that means it has right to 30% of company's profits.
    Last edited by Beryl from Northallerton; 14th December 2012 at 12:04 AM. Reason: no chatspeak please.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    English UK
    Posts
    36,406

    Re: In aliquot terms

    I'm 100% certain I wouldn't use "aliquot" there, Allaster.

    In fact, not being a mathematician, I'm 100% sure I've never used "aliquot" in my whole life.

    Maybe "in percentage terms" would work?

    (PS. We don't use "it" to refer to "a person".)
    In these shoes?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Greece
    Native language
    British English (Sussex)
    Posts
    11,061

    Re: In aliquot terms

    'Wordnik' has several examples of "aliquot" in context, including one from a recipe for tiramisu I had no idea what this word meant, but I love the sound of it and will try to incorporate it into some of my recipes in future.
    http://www.wordnik.com/words/aliquot

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Native language
    English - US
    Posts
    13,895

    Re: In aliquot terms

    I've had a lot of mathematics and I've only ever used the word in chemistry:
    n. chemistry a portion of a total amount of a solution or suspension.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Native language
    Slovak
    Posts
    100

    Re: In aliquot terms

    Ok wouldn't the phrase in aliquot terms at least sound even more odd than aliquotly . Thanks
    Last edited by Beryl from Northallerton; 14th December 2012 at 12:05 AM. Reason: no chatspeak please

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Native language
    English UK
    Posts
    36,406

    Re: In aliquot terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Allaster View Post
    Ok wouldn't the phrase in aliquot terms at least sound even more odd than aliquotly . Thanks
    Both would sound pretty odd to me, Allaster. "Aliquotly" would sound even more odd than "in aliquot terms".
    Last edited by Beryl from Northallerton; 14th December 2012 at 12:06 AM. Reason: ditto.
    In these shoes?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    This septic isle!
    Native language
    NW Englandish English
    Age
    50
    Posts
    28,689

    Re: In aliquot terms

    To me it wouldn't matter whether you said in aliquot terms or aliquotly or à la aliquot or aliquot-fashion or in a kinda aliquotty way ... I still wouldn't have the faintest idea what you meant.
    Edit yourself ~ its less embarassing than someone else doing it for you,

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Brittany, NW France
    Native language
    English (Midlands UK)
    Posts
    26,540

    Re: In aliquot terms

    I'd call this pro rata.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    England
    Native language
    English (England)
    Age
    38
    Posts
    16,924

    Re: In aliquot terms

    I've learnt something new today too - and I thought I'd done a fair bit of maths! It seems in the mathematical sense you use it for an amount which goes into another a whole-number amount of terms. For example, 1/3 is an aliquot part of 2/3 because it goes into 2/3 2 times, and 2 is a whole number. As such Allaster I can't see how it would work at all in your example as 30 does not go into 100 an exact number of times (leaving apart the problem that it seems the majority of people wouldn't understand what the word means). As Keith says, it sounds like you need something like "pro rata" or "proportionally". Person B with 30% of the shares has proportionally the same rights as A.
    ‘If a chap can’t compose an epic poem while he is weaving a tapestry, he had better shut up.' William Morris.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •