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Thread: To browse (through)...

  1. #1
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    To browse (through)...

    You know that: just browsing through books, etc., without really looking for something. It implies some kind of non-commitment, of freedom, like shopping, like surfing. How do you translate that?

    In Dutch we have:
    - grasduinen (grass-duning, where the dune seems to refer the hill as a place of abundance ! ;-))
    - snuffelen (sniff around, like a dog)
    - neuzen (nosing literally)
    Last edited by ThomasK; 24th December 2012 at 10:41 AM.

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Hi, Thomas. I think there is a word: szperać in Polish. It might be colloquial, or regional. It means something similar, but it would not apply in all of your phrases. The best location for szperać would be a drawer, a barn, some other places with multiple, odd items collected.
    Last edited by LilianaB; 24th December 2012 at 1:01 PM.

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Could you pin it down to some root? Also browsing? You know any kind of searching without specific goal would do...

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Hi TK,

    In Greek the generic term for it, is «περιήγηση» [peri'iʝisi] (fem.) --> browsing, while the verb is «περιηγούμαι» [peri.i'ɣume] --> to browse; it's a Classical compound verb: preposition & prefix «περὶ» pĕ'rĭ --> about, around (PIE base *per-, through, across, beyond) + verb «ἡγέομαι/ἡγοῦμαι» hē'gĕŏmæ [uncontracted]/hē'goumæ [contracted] --> to lead, command in war (PIE base *sag-, to track down, trace, seek). Browser is «περιηγητής» [peri.iʝi'tis] (masc.); its literal meaning is "one who guides strangers, the cicerone/guide" (i.e. the person conducting visitors and sightseers to museums, galleries, etc., and explains matters of archaeological, historic, artistic interest).
    When we are looking for something specific then the verb we use is «ψάχνω» ['psaxno] --> to search, rummage < Byz. «ψάχω» ['psaxo] < Classical Gr. «ψαύω» 'psauō --> to touch (with obscure etymology; Hoffmann suggests from PIE base *bʰ(e)sēu-, to rub)

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Is that really a military metaphor? Does this leave freedom to the explorer? This reminds me of spies who know the way, and then guide the others. In this case, 'grasduinen', it is more like looking thourgh things, somehow hoping, but just have a look at things that might perhaps be interesting. Is that what your word means?

    psaxo: I suppose they have in common that they touch and often go... (BTW: is it related with psalm by the way? ]

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Turkish:

    We would use the verb "karıştır" meaning "mix" in Turkish for "browsing through books"

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Czech:

    listovati, prolistovati = to leaf through;
    derived from the noun list = leaf (on the tree, in a book), sheet;

    For browsing the Internet we use the verb brouzdati (for its similarity with the English verb: the first syllable brouz- is pronounced similarly like browse; the verbs however are not cognates and have different meaning).

    Brouzdati means to move the feet about in shallow water, to paddle (like the children do in the paddling pool = brouzdaliště), usually watching the bottom and hoping to find something valuable or to see something interesting.
    Last edited by bibax; 25th December 2012 at 12:04 PM.

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Interesting contributions, thanks. I am still wondering about the Turkish word karıştır: how could you use it in other, non-metaphorical ways? I don't see the link between mixing and searching, or browsing, or is it something like rummaging - or does it refer to the result (everything 'mixed up')?

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Hebrew (modern, obviously) has a verb just for it, דיפדף /difdéf/. It comes from the word דף /daf/ which means paper.

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    Is that really a military metaphor? Does this leave freedom to the explorer? This reminds me of spies who know the way, and then guide the others. In this case, 'grasduinen', it is more like looking thourgh things, somehow hoping, but just have a look at things that might perhaps be interesting. Is that what your word means?
    No, «περιηγητής» is not military related. The verb «ἡγοῦμαι» though -which with «περί» forms the compound «περιηγοῦμαι»- is military related as it means amongst others, to command in war. «Περιηγοῦμαι» literally means to guide others; the noun «περιήγησις» in Byzantine Greek came to define the activity of tourism (for recreational purposes, or Itinerarium in Latin), and «περιηγητής» was the tourist; nowadays the verb is used (99 out of 100 times) to describe the browsing through the internet/books, and «περιηγητής» is the web browser. «Περιηγητής» is used in parallel with «πλοηγός» [plo.i'ɣos] (masc.) for browser; the latter is a modern construction (1858) and means navigator, (ship's) pilot; compound, «πλοῖον» 'plœŏn (neut.) --> ship (PIE base *pleu-, to flow, float) + v. «ἡγοῦμαι»

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    psaxo: I suppose they have in common that they touch and often go... (BTW: is it related with psalm by the way? ]
    They might be related (the etymology of both «ψάχω» & «ψάλλω» is obscure). Psalm (in Gr. «Ψαλμός») comes from the verb «ψάλλω» which was a technical term --> to pluck the strings of a musical instrument; the 72 scholars who translated the Hebrew sacred books into Koine Greek (Septuagint) used «ψαλμός» («ψαλμοί» in pl.) in order to render the Hebrew תְהִלִּים (Tehillim, or songs of praise), especially the sort sung by David to the harp. «Ψάλλω» in Byzantine and MG came to mean to chant in Church (it's used strictly within religious context, or when the National Anthem is chanted; we don't sing our Anthem, we chant it)
    Last edited by apmoy70; 25th December 2012 at 5:17 PM.
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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    Could you pin it down to some root? Also browsing? You know any kind of searching without specific goal would do...
    Hi, Thomas. Unfortunately I do not know the etymology of szperać -- I even tried to do some research, but all I found was unknown. All I found is this http://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/szperanie. Maybe some people from the Polish forum would know more about its etymology and use, especially in relation to the internet.
    Last edited by LilianaB; 25th December 2012 at 6:49 PM.

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    @tfighter, i would like to correct.
    difdef is strictly for books[=pages], daf is paper. also for pages is il'el, though it is not pure freedom, there is some degree of purpose, like looking for a sentence you remember or such.
    The general is rifref, for switching between channels its zipzep, and i think there are more but i cant remember.
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    Re: To browse (through)...

    That is an interesting link: with zapping (or is that just a coincidence)? What does rifref mean precisely?

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    zipzep comes from zap indeed, probably because in the old televisions, every time you switched channel it would do that annoying sound.

    also there are:
    sakar - which is more purposed than ilel, sakar is with interest; its like to review,cover.

    iyen - this is pure purpose looking, the opposite of free browsing.
    ilel also can show some degree of interest.
    golesh - translation of browse,surf the web, with context can be free purpose.
    and of course - adding the word stam with any of the above or with any of the see/look words gives free purpose.

    rifref is to move quickly between point a to point b(though not your body, the object you are using), like moving pages [=turning pages, from page 7 to page 70].
    this is what wikimilon gives:

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    is the repetition some kind of iterative form of the verb?

    The rest is quite interesting. If you could tell me more about the roots of those Hebrew verbs, please do.

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    what do you mean repetition?
    format , due to the many verbs will be as follow:
    verb in hebrew : root : source root/word : translation to english

    rifref : rfrf doubling the -> : rff : to flutter, to hover ; to glance at , to scan
    difdef : dfdf : df? :
    to leaf, to turn pages, to browse, to thumb through
    ilel : ilel (i,e are both ayin) : aleh = leaf :
    to leaf, to browse
    iyen : iyn : null :
    to study, to read ; to consider, to weigh
    golesh : g l sh : null : surf,browse the web ; though traditionally it is surfing waves
    sakar : skr : null : scan, cover, review
    zipzep : zpzp : zap : to switch between channels. come to think of it - it is more like switching between modes of an electrical entertaining machine, songs in mp, channels in television, though it cannot be said about radio channels.

    also there is something for doing and constantly switching between activities [= not social, the everyday/work ones], but that is not really purposeless.
    EDIT: ^ is letazez : tzz : null : doing back and forth like a maniac :P

    does that elaborate enough about the roots?
    Last edited by arielipi; 26th December 2012 at 10:46 AM.
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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Yes, it does, thanks. Great. As for repetition: I thought rifrf, difdef, were kind of repetitions with variations of the same root, expressing repitition of some kind.

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Quote Originally Posted by LilianaB View Post
    Hi, Thomas. Unfortunately I do not know the etymology of szperać -- I even tried to do some research, but all I found was unknown. All I found is this http://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/szperanie. Maybe some people from the Polish forum would know more about its etymology and use, especially in relation to the internet.
    Here it is:
    From old High German spieren or spüren, to search.

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    Re: To browse (through)...

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    Yes, it does, thanks. Great. As for repetition: I thought rifrf, difdef, were kind of repetitions with variations of the same root, expressing repitition of some kind.
    The piel form can't handle two clusters root, it needs three (in this case D,FD,F). This has sometimes been done by duplicating the whole word, like in these examples, or by duplicating only the last consonant, like with the English word Flirt who turned into the Hebrew verb Flirtet.

  20. #20
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    Re: To browse (through)...

    So no extra meaning (like iterative verb)?

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