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Thread: Anglosas

  1. #21
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    Re: Anglosas

    I agree that in Polish the term is used in reference to Englsh speaking countries; however, not always (the historical meaning of it apart).

    There is one wording that comes to mind and is a point in case here: kraje anglosaskie. It is used often enough in media that it should be known by the average Polish. Hearing it, I mainly think of three counries: the UK, the US and Australia. If I think more New Zeland comes to mind and vacilate about Canada.This may well be a personal thing, though.

    When I hear "Anglosas", the first thing I think of are the English, however. And I can't quite wrap my head around a wider scope of this term, but then again it might be a personal matter.
    Please correct my errors! Thanks.
    Corrigez-moi, s'il vous plaît! Merci.
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  2. #22
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    Re: Anglosas

    The fact that a term is based on a false assumption or an incorrect theory is almost never an obstacle for using it by general public or even by scholars. Take for example the word "turkey".

  3. #23
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    Re: Anglosas

    Not so long ago Mitt Romney has been taken to task for speaking of an 'Anglo-saxon heritage' shared by the US and the UK. John Swaine made an interesting point about it in this article, similar to that of LeTasmanien from post #9.

    More importantly, the adviser has a terrible way with words. The emphasis upon the “Anglo-Saxon” identity of the Atlantic alliance is out of date. Both countries are more multicultural than ever before, and both have forged alliances with countries that are decidedly un-Anglo-Saxon: the US is part of a trading bloc with Mexico and the UK is trapped in the engine room of the EU Titanic.
    Clearly, when using the word 'anglo-saxon', be it a verb or a noun, caution is advised.
    Last edited by dreamlike; 29th December 2012 at 11:46 PM.

  4. #24
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    Re: Anglosas

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Jamin View Post
    The fact that a term is based on a false assumption or an incorrect theory is almost never an obstacle for using it by general public or even by scholars.
    Well put.

  5. #25
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    Re: Anglosas

    Quote Originally Posted by dreamlike View Post
    Not so long ago Mitt Romney has been taken to task for speaking of an 'Anglo-saxon heritage' shared by the US and the UK. John Swaine made an interesting point about it in this article, similar to that of LeTasmanien from post #9.
    Well heritage, perhaps -- this is how the English language started after all. It is used in a different way in Polish, though -- the way I keep hearing it: it just means a person from Great Britain or the US -- this is why I was surprised.

  6. #26
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    Re: Anglosas

    Just for the record:
    Anglosas książk. «Brytyjczyk lub Amerykanin brytyjskiego pochodzenia»
    Dubisz, S., Uniwersalny słownik języka polskiego, PWN, 2003

    anglosaski ‹anglo- + saski› książk. «odnoszący się do cywilizacji i narodów brytyjskich»
    Kultura anglosaska.
    Społeczeństwo anglosaskie.
    Kraje anglosaskie «kraje anglojęzyczne, zwłaszcza Wielka Brytania i Stany Zjednoczone»
    Ibidem.
    Please correct my errors! Thanks.
    Corrigez-moi, s'il vous plaît! Merci.
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  7. #27
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    Re: Anglosas

    Quote Originally Posted by R.O View Post
    I have never ever in my entire life heard the word anglophone used in Polish.
    just for the record—it's anglofon.
    proszę o poprawianie błędów w moich wypowiedziach / please correct any mistakes in my utterances

  8. #28
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    Re: Anglosas

    That's what I meant.

  9. #29
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    Re: Anglosas

    Quote Originally Posted by kknd View Post
    just for the record—it's anglofon.
    I haven´t heard it either.
    Anglosas about the British and the US citizens as a collecive term has been used, though not extensively, mostly colloquial.

  10. #30
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    Re: Anglosas

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Jamin View Post
    I haven´t heard it either.
    Well, the same is true for me, and I'd be interested to know if it's used in, for example, academic writing. The only instances of this word in Polish, judging by Google results, are dictionary entries.. a Polish version of Google nGram would come in handy here...
    Last edited by dreamlike; 2nd January 2013 at 4:59 PM.

  11. #31
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    Re: Anglosas

    Well, we can't deny that word "Anglosas" is lexically correct, however, not only is it very rarely used, but its singular form is quite uncommon and it's present more often as plural "Anglosasi". That's how I see it.

  12. #32
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    Re: Anglosas

    What do you mean by lexically correct, Miklet? Would you refer to Eddie Murphy as Anglosas, for example? So what does the word mean in fact in Polish? This word is used differently in Polish than its English equivalent (or alleged equivalent), I think. In English one of the meanings is a member of the Anglo-Saxon culture, or English culture, but no-one call any particular individuals, inhabitants of the 21st world Anglo-Saxons.
    Last edited by LilianaB; 5th January 2013 at 2:05 PM.

  13. #33
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    Re: Anglosas

    Quote Originally Posted by LilianaB View Post
    What do you mean by lexically correct, Miklet? Would you refer to Eddie Murphy as Anglosas, for example? So what does the word mean in fact in Polish? This word is used differently in Polish than its English equivalent (or alleged equivalent), I think.
    I mean this word exists in language, but the frequency of its use towards the natives of English-speaking countries is low. I wouldn't call him Anglosas, because I just don't use this word in this context, although I accept the fact it can be used in that way.

    Quote Originally Posted by LilianaB View Post
    I think. In English one of the meanings is a member of the Anglo-Saxon culture, or English culture, but no-one call any particular individuals, inhabitants of the 21st world Anglo-Saxons.
    Historically, term Anglosasi in Polish describes the tribes which settled in the British isles, so this meaning seems to be very common with its English equivalent.

  14. #34
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    Re: Anglosas

    Thank you.

  15. #35
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    Re: Anglosas

    I wish we had some linguist-historian here because I don't consider myself as an authority in these fields

  16. #36
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    Re: Anglosas

    Yes, someone like a devoted Polish philologist would be great, from time to time.

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