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Thread: portuguese words, inho

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    portuguese words, inho

    Hello!

    I am curious about learning a few words/sentences/sayings in Portuguese, for a book that I am writing.

    What would a Mother call her teenage son and little daughters? Are there any affectionate, loving terms that a Mother uses?
    I've heard that te use of 'inho' and 'inha is common.

    So, can I have words like 'little baby' = bébinho? Is that a real word?
    The names Miguel and Marco will be Miguelinho and Marcinho?

    One more question...are there any Portuguese/Portuguese Brazilian lullabies which parents sing to their children?

    I look forward to any replies, thank you so much! )

    - Ali


    Ooops sorry, I put te wrong emoticon face in. I meant to put a smile
    Last edited by Vanda; 28th January 2013 at 11:52 AM. Reason: merge

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Welcome to the forums! ]

    What would a Mother call her teenage son and little daughters? Are there any affectionate, loving terms that a Mother uses?
    I've heard that te use of 'inho' and 'inha is common.

    So, can I have words like 'little baby' = bébinho? Is that a real word? - bebezinho
    The names Miguel and Marco will be Miguelinho and Marcinho?
    For Brazil:
    Moms use to say: filhinho (for sons)/ filhinha (for moms) and a million words when we speak to beloved babies.
    For Miguel we generally say: Miguelzinho

    And about the lullabies, google ''cantigas de ninar'' and you 'll have plenty of them.
    Eu quase que nada não sei. Mas desconfio de muita coisa...- Guimarães Rosa

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    And for Marco(s) you should say Marquinho(s).

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Quote Originally Posted by Vanda View Post
    Welcome to the forums! ]


    For Brazil:
    Moms use to say: filhinho (for sons)/ filhinha (for moms) and a million words when we speak to beloved babies.
    For Miguel we generally say: Miguelzinho

    And about the lullabies, google ''cantigas de ninar'' and you 'll have plenty of them.
    Hi, thank you so much for your reply! I appreciate it a lot, because I've got no idea.
    So...for example, a Mother would call her 15-year old son 'filhinho', yes? And he wouldn't be embarrassed by it?
    What other words or expressions can Mothers use? You mentioned there are a million words, I'd love to hear some, please, if you can help me out. That'd be super!
    How does a Mother say 'I love you' to her babies?

    I have googled what you recommended, I'll have to translate it into english a bit, but that's ok.

    Thanks again for replying so quickly!

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Hello Much thanks for fixing my Marco mistake! Marquinho...I never would have guessed there's a 'q' involved. Thank you for your reply.

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    ''So...for example, a Mother would call her 15-year old son 'filhinho', yes? And he wouldn't be embarrassed by it?'' - yes, he'll. He'd say that he is pagando mico in front of his friends if they hear it.
    ''What other words or expressions can Mothers use? You mentioned there are a million words, I'd love to hear some, please, if you can help me out. That'd be super!'' - the problem is this is very personal, love inspires the dumbiest words with a love tone on them.
    ''How does a Mother say 'I love you' to her babies?'' - te amo


    For words and simpler expressions, have a look in our dictionary on top of the page:
    http://www.wordreference.com/enpt/love
    Last edited by Vanda; 29th January 2013 at 1:00 AM.
    Eu quase que nada não sei. Mas desconfio de muita coisa...- Guimarães Rosa

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Quote Originally Posted by Ali81 View Post
    So...for example, a Mother would call her 15-year old son 'filhinho', yes? And he wouldn't be embarrassed by it?
    Depends on the family, but usually teenagers get upset to be called "inho" (filhinho, queridinho).
    One can say filho, querido, meu amor, filhote, filhão...
    A ignorância é um lugar quentinho. (Leonardo Sakamoto)

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    Oh thank you for that link! This is great!

    Yes, I was thinking that maybe a teenage son would blush a bit from embarrassment Thankyou for your help and suggestions, I appreciate it!
    Last edited by Vanda; 29th January 2013 at 12:59 AM. Reason: merge

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Quote Originally Posted by Vanda View Post
    ''So...for example, a Mother would call her 15-year old son 'filhinho', yes? And he wouldn't be embarrassed by it?'' - yes, he'll. He'd say that he is pagando mico in front of his friends if they hear it.
    ''What other words or expressions can Mothers use? You mentioned there are a million words, I'd love to hear some, please, if you can help me out. That'd be super!'' - the problem is this is very personal, love inspires the dumbiest words with a love tone on them.
    ''How does a Mother say 'I love you' to her babies?'' - te amo


    For words and simpler expressions, have a look in our dictionary on top of the page:
    http://www.wordreference.com/enpt/love

    ***
    Hi Vanda, how are you?

    I had a look at the dictionary...so the embarrassed boy would say 'Pagando mico!' to his Mother? I see that it is said after being 'made a fool of'...in english this would be 'I'm ashamed'? I'm a bit confused about this.

    I understand about the love expressions being personal, so I researched a few words to suit my book characters... I hope they're correct?
    Can the Mother call her son, who has a spikey hairstyle, "Meu pequenino porco-espinho"? In english, this would be 'my little porcupine'.
    Also...for her other son, who is a sweet, gentle boy with big, brown eyes..."Meu de grande olhos castanhos filinho"? In english, this would be 'My big brown-eyed little boy'? Or instead of 'grande', can I put 'doce' for sweet?
    For a little sweet 8year old daughter with curly hair, can I say ' My sweet curly-haired baby girl'..."Meu doce de cabelos enrolados filinha"?
    And lastly, a little 5year old boy who likes giving cuddles to his Mother...can I call him a 'funny, little bear'...like "Meu divertido pequenino urso"

    I'm sorry for all the trouble, and thank you a lot!

    - Ali

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Quote Originally Posted by Ali81 View Post
    Hello!

    I am curious about learning a few words/sentences/sayings in Portuguese, for a book that I am writing.

    What would a Mother call her teenage son and little daughters? Are there any affectionate, loving terms that a Mother uses?
    I've heard that te use of 'inho' and 'inha is common.

    So, can I have words like 'little baby' = bébinho? Is that a real word?
    The names Miguel and Marco will be Miguelinho and Marcinho?

    One more question...are there any Portuguese/Portuguese Brazilian lullabies which parents sing to their children?

    I look forward to any replies, thank you so much! )

    - Ali



    Ooops sorry, I put te wrong emoticon face in. I meant to put a smile
    Well, one must be careful with certain diminutive forms in this beautiful but tricky Portuguese language. So, little baby is translated as bebeZinho, the same way as Miguel becomes MiguelZinho,BUT Marco is not Marcinho, which is the diminutive of Marcio. Marco = Marquinho. Regarding teens I do agree that none of them would appreciate being called "filhinho" — strange as it may seem, "filhão" is one rather fitting term in this case; and "filhota" for girls. But don't worry, just go on and ask us the diminutives you happen to be doubtful about!

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Hello Luiz! Thanks for your reply. Oh, so bebezinho is a real word after all!
    What do filhão/filhota mean exactly?...Filho is son/filha is daughter, yes? so what do the remaining letters mean in english?
    Filhinho means little baby boy, yes? So its too cute for adolescents, okay, I get it.
    Portuguese sounds lovely, but I'm starting to believe it is difficult to learn! I'm happy I found this forum.

    Are these expressions correct?
    - Meu pequenino porco-espinho = my little porcupine (one of my story characters has spikey hair, and I want his Mother to tease him lovingly about it, so she calls him her little porcupine son.)
    - Meu de grande olhos castanhos filinho/filhão = my big brown-eyed little boy...Or instead of 'grande', can I put 'doce' for sweet?
    - My sweet curly-haired baby girl = Meu doce de cabelos enrolados filinha/filhota
    - My funny, little bear baby boy = Meu divertido pequenino urso filhinho

    Thank you for everything!

    - Ali

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Em Portugal, dizemos Miguelinho para Miguel

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    O único Miguel bebê que conheço é chamado de "Miguelito" pelas tias.

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Oh, so bebezinho is a real word after all!
    Yes, is the diminutive for bebê (baby)
    What do filhão/filhota mean exactly?
    "Filhão" is the augmentative for filho, "filhote" is the word for puppy and is used as a diminutive for "filho", "filhota" used as a diminutive for "filha"
    Filhinho means little baby boy, yes? So its too cute for adolescents, okay, I get it.
    "Filhinho" is the diminutive for "filho"

    Are these expressions correct?
    In my opinion, the use of this kind of expressions from a mother to her child is not usual and may sound very old fashioned. There are too many adjectives in each expression

    - Meu pequenino porco-espinho = maybe "meu porco-espinho querido" "meu porco-espinho predileto" (for teasing purposes it works, but it is not too tender)
    - Meu de grande olhos castanhos filinho/filhão = Meu filhinho de grandes olhos castanhos (no one would say it, sounds too "literary stuff") maybe: Meu filho/filhote/filhinho de olhos lindos
    - My sweet curly-haired baby girl = Minha doce menina de cabelos cacheados (literary stuff) -> Meu docinho, meus cachinhos, minha princesinha/gatinha de cabelos cacheados/enrolados
    - My funny, little bear baby boy = Meu divertido pequenino urso filhinho -> "Meu ursinho" should work here
    A ignorância é um lugar quentinho. (Leonardo Sakamoto)

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Quote Originally Posted by Ali81 View Post
    Hello Luiz! Thanks for your reply. Oh, so bebezinho is a real word after all!
    What do filhão/filhota mean exactly?...Filho is son/filha is daughter, yes? so what do the remaining letters mean in english?
    Filhinho means little baby boy, yes? So its too cute for adolescents, okay, I get it.
    Portuguese sounds lovely, but I'm starting to believe it is difficult to learn! I'm happy I found this forum.

    Are these expressions correct?
    - Meu pequenino porco-espinho = my little porcupine (one of my story characters has spikey hair, and I want his Mother to tease him lovingly about it, so she calls him her little porcupine son.)
    - Meu de grande olhos castanhos filinho/filhão = my big brown-eyed little boy...Or instead of 'grande', can I put 'doce' for sweet?
    - My sweet curly-haired baby girl = Meu doce de cabelos enrolados filinha/filhota
    - My funny, little bear baby boy = Meu divertido pequenino urso filhinho

    Thank you for everything!

    - Ali


    (Although formally some of them are correct, their usage sounds unnatural in this context. Normally, one would only use the adjective when speaking directly to the person, but not when talking about him/her. So, it would be good if you could give us more context here).

    Anyway, Ali, here it goes:

    — Meu pequeno (rather than pequenino, which is not wrong) porco-espinho. (how about "ouricinho" — sea urchin — instead?)
    — (Brown-eyed people are so common in Brazil that nobody would likely highlight this feature when talking to his/her son; instead, a quite good expression would be "olhos de jabuticaba" — which is a black, coin-sized round fruit)
    — Minha querida filhinha/filhota de cabelos encaracolados.
    — Meu ursinho engraçadinho (talking to him).

    And yes, like Patriota said, "Miguelito", although being a Spanish form, sounds appropriate for a baby.

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Quote Originally Posted by patriota View Post
    O único Miguel bebê que conheço é chamado de "Miguelito" pelas tias.
    Também,
    mas estávamos a falar dos 'inhos'

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Quote Originally Posted by Ali81 View Post
    Hello Luiz! Thanks for your reply. Oh, so bebezinho is a real word after all!
    What do filhão/filhota mean exactly?...Filho is son/filha is daughter, yes? so what do the remaining letters mean in english?
    Filhinho means little baby boy, yes? So its too cute for adolescents, okay, I get it.
    Portuguese sounds lovely, but I'm starting to believe it is difficult to learn! I'm happy I found this forum.

    Are these expressions correct?
    - Meu pequenino porco-espinho / meu porco-espinhozinho = my little porcupine (one of my story characters has spikey hair, and I want his Mother to tease him lovingly about it, so she calls him her little porcupine son.)
    - Meu de grande olhos castanhos filinho/filhão Meu filhinho de grande olhos castanhos = my big brown-eyed little boy...Or instead of 'grande', can I put 'doce' for sweet? Depends on what you mean
    - My sweet curly-haired baby girl = Meu doce de cabelos enrolados filinha/filhotaMinha filhinha de cabelos encaracolados/aos caracóis
    - My funny, little bear baby boy = Meu divertido pequenino urso filhinho Meu filhinho, meu ursinho tão engraçado

    Thank you for everything!

    - Ali
    Portuguese is a rather supple language as to the expression of warm and affectionate feelings. Affection can be expressed namely both by diminutives ('filhinho', 'filhote', filhito', 'bebezinho', 'bebezito', 'bebezote', 'Miguelinho', 'Miguelito', 'Migucho', for instance) and augmentatives ('filhão', 'bebezão', 'Miguelão' and the like), the set of possibilities being quite large. Portuguese having different rules as to the placement of adjectives, literal translations the way you did sounds weird. Compound adjectivation like 'sweet curly-haired baby' or 'funny, little bear baby' cannot be used the same way as in English. Also, the direct translation of 'sweet' in the first sentence would be redundant because the diminutive 'filhinho' already conveys that meaning. Furthermore cultural idyosincracies make literal translations almost impossible and you have to be a native or a very seasoned translator to know, for example, that you can use the word 'filhão' for a male baby in an affectionate way but that the corresponding word for a female baby, 'filhona', could sound rude in many contexts ('filhota', on the other hand, would be OK). Of course there are other ways of translating your sentences (*). Mine is just a suggestion.

    P.S. (*) As the previous posts, which were posted while I was writing mine, clearly demonstrate.

    Last edited by Carfer; 29th January 2013 at 2:11 PM.

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Guys, I can't believe we are discussing ''there is this, there isn't that''when speaking of nicks moms give to their children. Any thing you can imagine or you can make up to sound affectionate is possible. That is why I said there are 1 million possibilities to address children, lovers, - whatever.
    Miguelzão, Miguelinho, Miguelzinho, Migué, Miguelito (I myself call ''our'' Mike like that), Miguilim and so on. Aninha, Anita, Nana, Ninha... well, you just make according to your own will and taste.

    As Carfer said it: ''Mine is just a suggestion.''That means, anything we put in this context are just that: suggestions! .
    Eu quase que nada não sei. Mas desconfio de muita coisa...- Guimarães Rosa

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    Re: portuguese words, inho

    Quote Originally Posted by Carfer View Post
    Portuguese is a rather supple language as to the expression of warm and affectionate feelings. Affection can be expressed namely both by diminutives ('filhinho', 'filhote', filhito', 'bebezinho', 'bebezito', 'bebezote', 'Miguelinho', 'Miguelito', 'Migucho', for instance) and augmentatives ('filhão', 'bebezão', 'Miguelão' and the like), the set of possibilities being quite large. Portuguese having different rules as to the placement of adjectives, literal translations the way you did sounds weird. Compound adjectivation like 'sweet curly-haired baby' or 'funny, little bear baby' cannot be used the same way as in English. Also, the direct translation of 'sweet' in the first sentence would be redundant because the diminutive 'filhinho' already conveys that meaning. Furthermore cultural idyosincracies make literal translations almost impossible and you have to be a native or a very seasoned translator to know, for example, that you can use the word 'filhão' for a male baby in an affectionate way but that the corresponding word for a female baby, 'filhona', could sound rude in many contexts ('filhota', on the other hand, would be OK). Of course there are other ways of translating your sentences (*). Mine is just a suggestion.

    P.S. (*) As the previous posts, which were posted while I was writing mine, clearly demonstrate.

    Ah, Carfer! não estou nada de acordo.

    Ninguém, eu pelo menos nunca diria, dirá: Meu porco-espinhozinho e sim meu pequenino porco-espinho.
    Da mesma maneira que se pode e se diz: minha doce filhinha. É redundante porquê? se fosse minha pequenina filhinha, percebia, assim não.

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    Re: portuguese words, inho


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