Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Native language
    English - U.S.
    Posts
    36

    mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    What the difference between mehr and eher (when eher means 'more')? I came across this text:

    Im Nordwestern ist das Klima mehr ozeanisch mit warmen, aber selten heißen Somern und relativ milden Wintern. Im Osten ist es eher kontinental. ...

    It seems like the structures are nearly equivalent so I'm wondering if there's a difference in tone/register/meaning.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Dresden, Universum
    Native language
    German, Germany
    Age
    61
    Posts
    15,045

    Re: Eher/mehr

    In your sentence "mehr" means "more" but "eher" means something like "in contrast to this it is more continental"/"in contrast to this it is more probably continental".
    You cannot replace it by "mehr" without loosing the contrast connotation.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Native language
    German – Austria
    Age
    26
    Posts
    382

    Re: Eher/mehr

    I think that the same case might appear in English, too. I guess one can say the climate is more moderate and also the climate is rather moderate, but I'm not sure. However, this is what I first thought thinking about it.

    In my opinion the main difference is that when using mehr, there usually has to been something which the thing you are speaking about is compared to, which is not absolutely necessary when using eher.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Dresden, Universum
    Native language
    German, Germany
    Age
    61
    Posts
    15,045

    Re: Eher/mehr

    I found "rather" in the dictionary, but I am not sure whether it fits to the context. Does it have the "contrast" connotation?

    Here I found a lot of usages of "eher". http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/eher.html

    Im Osten ist es eher kontinental. ...
    But in the east it is more likely continental. ...
    Last edited by Hutschi; 3rd February 2013 at 2:40 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Native language
    English - U.S.
    Posts
    36

    Re: Eher/mehr

    I wrote a whole response to this that got erased, but let me try again.

    Rather has a few different uses in English. The most common have a sense of instead:

    1. >Can I go to the park by myself? >No, I'd rather go with you (than let you go by yourself). [Ich gehe lieber mit dir mit]
    2. >He does not believe that X is the case; rather, he believes that Y is the case. (rather=sondern, I think).
    This usage sounds very formal and might occur in some writing but not in everyday speech.

    Additionally, it can be used as a much milder form of very (as you said, Riverplatense).

    3. >I expected the weather to be bad today, but it's actually rather mild.
    You should know that this sounds a bit antiquated or aristocratic and is also something you won't really hear in spoken English.

    So it seems like eher be used like rather in examples 1 and 3, right?

    Also, is there a difference between eher and lieber?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Santiago, Chile
    Native language
    Español
    Age
    38
    Posts
    6,536

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    As far as I know lieber is more related to preference, whereas eher is more related to contrast.
    Este hospital é livre... livre para aqueles que podem pagar, e livre daqueles que não podem...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cologne, Germany
    Native language
    German - Germany
    Age
    52
    Posts
    3,128

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by zarvox View Post
    What the difference between mehr and eher (when eher means 'more')? I came across this text:

    Im Nordwestern ist das Klima mehr ozeanisch mit warmen, aber selten heißen Somern und relativ milden Wintern. Im Osten ist es eher kontinental. ...
    The difference is that mehr ozeanisch is wrong, whereas eher kontinental is right.
    The comparative form of the German positive ozeanisch is ozeanischer and not *mehr ozeanisch. The only analytic comparative form in German is built with eher (engl.: rather), not with more; so eher ozeanisch would be right.
    Song of the Nibelungs (222): THE KING SENT GERNOT BACK TO WORMS ... http://books.google.de/books?id=27no_PxwUkEC&pg=PA77&dq="222"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Santiago, Chile
    Native language
    Español
    Age
    38
    Posts
    6,536

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by Gernot Back View Post
    The difference is that mehr ozeanisch is wrong, whereas eher kontinental is right.
    The comparative form of the German positive ozeanisch is ozeanischer and not *mehr ozeanisch. The only analytic comparative form in German is built with eher (engl.: rather), not with more; so eher ozeanisch would be right.
    I'd just like to confirm... when you compare two different attributes of a noun, you should use mehr instead of the _er form. Can you please confirm this?

    Chile ist länger als Argentinien, but
    Chile ist mehr langals breit.
    (instead of ...länger als breiter)
    Este hospital é livre... livre para aqueles que podem pagar, e livre daqueles que não podem...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by gvergara View Post
    I'd just like to confirm... when you compare two different attributes of a noun, you should use mehr instead of the _er form. Can you please confirm this?

    Chile ist länger als Argentinien, but
    Chile ist mehr langals breit.
    (instead of ...länger als breiter)
    I can confirm that the comparative mehr+adjective does not exist in German. Contrary to English, German has only the -er form to construct the comparative. If you ever encounter mehr+adjective in a German sentence it means rather, very similar to eher, maybe stronger. The sentence Chile ist mehr lang als breit is one you wouldn't likely hear from a native speaker. And if you did then it would mean something like this: I wouldn't call Chile wide but I would rather call it long.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Santiago, Chile
    Native language
    Español
    Age
    38
    Posts
    6,536

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by berndf View Post
    I can confirm that the comparative mehr+adjective does not exist in German. Contrary to English, German has only the -er form to construct the comparative. If you ever encounter mehr+adjective in a German sentence it means rather, very similar to eher, maybe stronger. The sentence Chile ist mehr lang als breit is one you wouldn't likely hear from a native speaker. And if you did then it would mean something like this: I wouldn't call Chile wide but I would rather call it long.
    Schöne Erklärung! I was mixing up English with German; in the former you use more before pairs of adjectives describing one noun (Chile is more long than wide), even if these are short adjectives. Cheers

    G.
    Last edited by gvergara; 10th February 2013 at 1:45 PM.
    Este hospital é livre... livre para aqueles que podem pagar, e livre daqueles que não podem...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Dresden, Universum
    Native language
    German, Germany
    Age
    61
    Posts
    15,045

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by Gernot Back View Post
    The difference is that mehr ozeanisch is wrong, whereas eher kontinental is right.
    The comparative form of the German positive ozeanisch is ozeanischer and not *mehr ozeanisch. The only analytic comparative form in German is built with eher (engl.: rather), not with more; so eher ozeanisch would be right.
    I agree that it is not possible as comparative. But it is no comparative. So it is possible. The style may be more colloquial, maybe, than using "in einem höheren Grade" or "eher". Nevertheless I do not think that it is wrong, it is just no comparative.
    See also http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/..._hoeher_besser
    They give explicitely the form as correct:The Duden gives also:
    Die Plastik steht besser mehr links
    - It is not a comparative "linker", but means "in a higher degree". You cannot build a comparative with "links". But you can give a relative placement. It is "more to the left" rather than "more left".

    Ich stimme zu, dass die Steigerungsform nicht mit "mehr" gebildet wird.
    Jedoch hat "mehr" auch eine Reihe eigener Bedeutungen.
    Der Sprachstil ist dabei öfter eher umgangssprachlich, auch gibt es feste Wendungen.

    "Mehr" kann bedeuten: eher, ein größerer Anteil, in einem stärkeren Grade, eine größere Menge.

    "Es ist mehr kontinental" bedeutet nicht, es ist "kontinentaler" sondern es ist stärker kontinental, es ist in einem höheren Maße kontinental, es ist eher kontinental.

    mehr ozeanisch - eher kontinental - das ist eine durchaus übliche Wendung, um den Kontrast darzustellen.
    es bedeutet:
    es ist in einem höheren Grade/stärker ozeanisch, während das andere eher/vorzugsweise kontinental ist.
    Das bezieht sich darauf, dass ozeanisch nicht eine einfache Eigenschaft ist, sondern eine Mischung verschiedenster Eigenschaften.

    Das ist mehr rot als grün: Der Anteil von Rot ist höher. Nicht: es ist roter/röter.
    Das ist eher rot als grün: Man kann es nicht genau unterscheiden, aber ich denke, dass die Farbe eher in den roten Bereich einzuordnen ist.
    Last edited by Hutschi; 10th February 2013 at 10:37 AM. Reason: Duden Examples

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by Hutschi View Post
    Das ist mehr rot als grün: Der Anteil von Rot ist höher. Nicht: es ist roter/röter.
    Das ist eher rot als grün: Man kann es nicht genau unterscheiden, aber ich denke, dass die Farbe eher in den roten Bereich einzuordnen ist.
    Ich denke immer noch, dass beides in etwa dasselbe bedeutet; die Variante mit eher ist nur etwas vorsichtiger und die mit mehr affirmativer.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Dresden, Universum
    Native language
    German, Germany
    Age
    61
    Posts
    15,045

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by berndf View Post
    Ich denke immer noch, dass beides in etwa dasselbe bedeutet; die Variante mit eher ist nur etwas vorsichtiger und die mit mehr affirmativer.
    Bei entsprechendem Kontext stimme ich zu. Ich wollte nur einen möglichen Unterschied darstellen, hätte aber dazu schreiben müssen, dass es vom Kontext abhängt.
    "Eher" kann man nicht einsetzen, wenn es sich um eine rot und grün gescheckte Fläche handelt. Beide kann man verwenden, wenn es sich um einen eher gleichförmigen Farbton handelt.

    Der wesentliche Punkt ist, dass "mehr" möglich und nicht falsch ist, allerdings nicht als Komparativ im eigentlichen Sinn verwendet wird.

    Für mich ergibt sich eine weitere Frage: Wird "mehr" nie als Teil einer Komparativform - und sei es bei schlechtem Stil - verwendet, oder gibt es Ausnahmen? Ich habe keine gefunden.
    Last edited by Hutschi; 10th February 2013 at 11:44 AM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by Hutschi View Post
    Der wesentliche Punkt ist, dass "mehr" möglich und nicht falsch ist.
    Da hast Du Recht. Es ist möglich, ist aber keine Komperativform.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cologne, Germany
    Native language
    German - Germany
    Age
    52
    Posts
    3,128

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by berndf View Post
    Es ist möglich, ist aber keine Komperativform.
    Naja, bei mehr und eher handelt es sich durchaus jeweils um Komparative, wobei es sich interessanterweise bei [*eh, eher, am ehesten] um ein Paradigma ohne Positiv (normalerweise die Grundform eines Adjektivs) handelt. Hier reden wir aber nicht von mehr und eher als attributiven oder prädikativen Adjektiven, sondern von Gradadverbien.

    Vielleicht ist die Verwendung von mehr als Gradadverb, mit dem man dann analytische Komparative aus allen möglichen Adjektiven bilden kann, nicht falsch; insbesondere dann nicht, wenn man es im Zusammenhang von mehr oder weniger (ozeanisch, grün, rot, etc. ) benutzt. Die übliche standardsprachliche Form einer solchen analytischen Gradadverbkombination ist aber -davon abgesehen- eher die mit eher.

    Der Komparativ mehr kommt in Kombination mit Adjektiven im Positiv aber dialektal vor, z.B. im Moselfränkischen.

    Quote Originally Posted by Besch, Werner; Knoop, Ulrich; Putschke, Wolfgang; Wiegand, Herbert E.: Dialektologie. 2. Halbband
    4.2. Analytische Komparation

    Der Gebrauch der Schriftsprache stützt die synthetische Komparation in den Mundarten, doch treten daneben auch analytische Komparationsformen auf. Dabei ist die synthetische Komparation durch Gradadverb vom Intebsivadverbsyntagma zu unterscheiden. Ein Gradadveb liegt vor, wenn die Verwendung des Komparationssyntagmas (z. B. analytischer Komparativ) auch in der Vergleichskonstruktion möglich ist, während das Syntagma mit Intensivadverb dieser Möglichkeit entbehrt.
    Song of the Nibelungs (222): THE KING SENT GERNOT BACK TO WORMS ... http://books.google.de/books?id=27no_PxwUkEC&pg=PA77&dq="222"

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by Gernot Back View Post
    Naja, bei mehr und eher handelt es sich durchaus jeweils um Komparative, wobei es sich interessanterweise bei [*eh, eher, am ehesten] um ein Paradigma ohne Positiv (normalerweise die Grundform eines Adjektivs) handelt. Hier reden wir aber nicht von mehr und eher als attributiven oder prädikativen Adjektiven, sondern von Gradadverbien.
    Das es sich um Abverbien handelt ist m.E. klar und wurde auch nie bestritten. Da sie die Konstrukte mehr+adjektiv und eher+adjektiv etwas anderes bedeuten als der grammatische Komperativ (-er), würde ich sie von diesem unterscheiden wollen. Natürlich könnte man hierfür ein eine eigen grammatische Kategorie aufmachen. Ich halte aber solch inflationären Gebrauch grammatische Kategorien für wenig sinnvoll(*), sonst müsste man ja für alle möglichen graduierende Adverbien eigene grammatische Kategorien einführen (Das Wetter war vorwiegend schön).
    __________________
    (*) Eigentlich halte ich es für dusselig; aber wir wollen hier ja zumindest versuchen objektiv zu bleiben.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cologne, Germany
    Native language
    German - Germany
    Age
    52
    Posts
    3,128

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by berndf View Post
    Natürlich könnte man hierfür ein eine eigen grammatische Kategorie aufmachen. Ich halte aber solch inflationären Gebrauch grammatische Kategorien für wenig sinnvoll(*), sonst müsste man ja für alle möglichen graduierende Adverbien eigene grammatische Kategorien einführen (Das Wetter war vorwiegend schön).
    Der Begriff des Gradadverbs ist aber in der Linguistik durchaus etabliert und auch vorwiegend wird durchaus als Gradadverb benutzt.
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gradadverb
    Song of the Nibelungs (222): THE KING SENT GERNOT BACK TO WORMS ... http://books.google.de/books?id=27no_PxwUkEC&pg=PA77&dq="222"

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Geneva
    Native language
    German (Germany)
    Age
    55
    Posts
    20,100

    Re: mehr ozeanisch / eher kontinental

    Quote Originally Posted by Gernot Back View Post
    Der Begriff des Gradadverbs ist aber in der Linguistik durchaus etabliert und auch vorwiegend wird durchaus als Gradadverb benutzt.
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gradadverb
    Habe ich ja auch gesagt (graduierende Adverbien). Das ist aber eben was anderes als ein grammatischer Komperativ.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •