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Thread: Hold, keep, save...

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Native language
    Tamil
    Posts
    237

    Re: Hold, keep, save...

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    How about saving, keeping, storing, Aruniyan?
    Saer(to join with) also used for "to store", panathai saer(save the money)
    Vai -(Keep) Enn-idam vaithu-kolvaen( I will keep with me)

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Native language
    Belgium, Dutch
    Posts
    6,384

    Re: Hold, keep, save...

    That is a huge number of verbs. I recognize ter, manter (prender), -guardar, salvar, preservar, but not poupar or apertar (does not have to do with opening, I suppose). The use of segurar is something I had not thought of but putting in security is a form of protection of course, but the Dutch equivalent verzekeren is not used in that way in Dutch (more like assure, insure, not physical)

    Don't you have lots of words based on the ter root, like de-tent-ion, abs-tent-ion, in-tent-ion (I think they are all based on Lat. tenere)?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Native language
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Posts
    28,006

    Re: Hold, keep, save...

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    That is a huge number of verbs.
    I kept thinking of different senses of "to hold" and such...

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    ... but not poupar or apertar (does not have to do with opening, I suppose).
    Apertar is a cognate (and synonym) of Spanish apretar, which according to the DRAE comes from lat. tardío appectorāre, der. de pectus 'pecho' (chest).

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    The use of segurar is something I had not thought of but putting in security is a form of protection of course, but the Dutch equivalent verzekeren is not used in that way in Dutch (more like assure, insure, not physical)
    There is also assegurar, to insure, to reassure.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    Don't you have lots of words based on the ter root, like de-tent-ion, abs-tent-ion, in-tent-ion (I think they are all based on Lat. tenere)?
    Right. Here are two related to the topic of your thread: detentor, owner, holder, possessor; detido, detainee. But these are clearly related to deter, to hold/possess, to detain. I thought you were asking for less obvious derivations.
    Deuparth gwaith yw ei ddechrau.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Native language
    Belgium, Dutch
    Posts
    6,384

    Re: Hold, keep, save...

    As for the latter: well, any word containing a non-obvious reference to keeping, holding, saving, is welcome as well, you know. ;-)

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Native language
    German
    Posts
    874

    Re: Hold, keep, save...

    In German:

    to hold:
    - halten - same etymology as 'to hold', obviously
    - in der Hand halten - to hold in one's hand

    to keep:
    - behalten - prefix be- + halten
    - aufrecht erhalten - aufrecht ('upright') + prefix er- + halten
    ...

    to save:
    - retten - to save someone from dying, for instance
    - Geld sparen - to save money (Geld = 'money')
    - speichern (Computer) - speichern means 'to store'

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Native language
    Japanese
    Posts
    464

    Re: Hold, keep, save...

    Japanese:

    to hold: tsukamu(to take hold of), motsu(to have)
    to keep : tamotsu(to maintain)
    to save : tameru(to accumluate), tasukeru(to rescue), sukuu(to rescue, to pick up)

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Native language
    Greek
    Age
    45
    Posts
    2,373

    Re: Hold, keep, save...

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    Thanks a lot for these interesting contributions!

    @Apmoy: /krato/ as a basic metaphor for ruling... Interesting! -- /tirao/ : do I recognize 'tyrant' in that word ?
    They sound similar, but they're not cognates I'm afraid. Don't let the MoGr pronunciation of both /η/ («τηράω» [tiˈɾa.o]) & /υ/ («τύραννος» [ˈtiɾanos]) as [ i ] fool you, the two words are not related; «τύραννος» (tyrant) is probably an early Greek borrowing from an Anatolian IE language (possibly from the Hittite tarwana, from PIE *dʰer-/*dʰeregʰ-, to hold, hold firm cognate of Lat. turris, OEng. torr, Gr. τύρσος; all three describe the tower btw). «Τηράω» is not.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThomasK View Post
    /sotèr/ is quite well-known in Christian doctrine, I believe, Saviour...
    Indeed, «Σωτήρ» Sōtḗr is the Saviour (Lat. Salvātor) but the name predates Christianity by a few centuries, it was the epithet applied to Zeus-protector, «Ζεύς Σωτήρ», "Jupiter Salvātor"
    Les Grecs sont étonnants dans l'adversité - François Pouqueville

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