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Thread: to be a living corpse

  1. #1
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    to be a living corpse

    How do you say that idiom in your language?

    Hungarian: élő halott [living dead]
    German: lebender Leichnam [living corpse]
    Czech: živá mrtvola [living corpse]
    [ɒkinɛk humorɒ vɒn, mindɛnˤtud, ɒkinɛk niŋʧ, mindɛnrɛ ke.pɛʃ]

  2. #2
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    Aug 2009
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    Re: to be a living corpse

    Russian: живой труп /jivoy trup/ - living corpse

    (that was the title of a play by Leo Tolstoy written in the eraly 1900s - I believe the expression is mostly known from that).

  3. #3
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    Re: to be a living corpse

    Czech: also živoucí mrtvola (which is the title of Tolstoy's play in Czech)

    Latin: vivum cadaver
    Slovak: živá mŕtvola
    Last edited by bibax; 13th March 2013 at 12:54 AM.

  4. #4
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    Re: to be a living corpse

    In Greek:

    «Ζωντανός-νεκρός» [zonda'nos ne'kros] --> living dead

    Adj. «ζωντανός, -νή, -νό» [zonda'nos] (masc.), [zonda'ni] (fem.), [zonda'no] (neut.) < Byz. adj. «ζωντανός» < Classical present tense, active voice, participle «ζῶν» zōn --> he who lives (verb «ζήω/ζῶ» zḗō (uncontracted) / zō (contracted), Ιonic «ζώω» zṓō --> to live; PIE *gʷíh₃we, to live) + adjective-forming suffix «-ανός» [-a'nos].

    Adj. «νεκρός, -ή, -ό» [ne'kros] (masc.), [ne'kri] (fem.), [ne'kro] (neut.) --> dead < Classical adj. «νεκρός, νεκρὰ, νεκρόν» nĕkrós (masc.), nĕkrà (fem.), nĕkrón (neut.) --> dead (poetic «νέκυς, νέκυια, νέκυν» nékus (masc.), nékuiă (fem.), nékun (neut.) --> dead, feminine form also necromancy); PIE *nek, death, dead cf Skt. नश्यति (nAzyati), to lose, perish; Lat. nocēre, to hurt, injure > It. nuocere, Fr. nuire, Eng. noxious.

    The title of Tolstoy's play in Greek is «Το ζωντανό πτώμα» [to zonda'no 'ptoma] --> "The living corpse"

    Neut. noun «πτώμα» ['ptoma] < Classical neut. noun «πτῶμα» ptômă --> corpse, fallen in battle/in wrestling (PIE *pet- (2), to fall, tumble)
    Last edited by apmoy70; 12th March 2013 at 6:05 PM. Reason: added Tolstoy's play
    Les Grecs sont étonnants dans l'adversité - François Pouqueville

  5. #5
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    Re: to be a living corpse

    Swedish:
    Levande död
    - living dead
    "Colorless green ideas sleep furiously" is grammatically correct but semantically nonsensical

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Finnish
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    Re: to be a living corpse

    Finnish:

    elävä kuollut
    (living dead)

    Personally, I'd say I'm a zombie (Finnish pronunciation: /tsombi/) before my morning coffee.
    -pa, -pä | Retorinen kysymys | Mitäpä Kaarina osaisi. (= Kaarina ei osaa mitään.)

  7. #7
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    Re: to be a living corpse

    Norwegian:

    levende død (living dead)
    Quote Originally Posted by Määränpää View Post

    Personally, I'd say I'm a zombie (Finnish pronunciation: /tsombi/) before my morning coffee.
    I agree with you Määränpää.

    In large part due to the success of the television program "The Walking Dead" here in the U.S., the first word that comes to mind when I think of "living dead" is zombie.
    Vær snill og rett feilene mine (Please correct my mistakes)

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