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Thread: in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

  1. #1
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    in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

    Hi teachers,
    The definition is just intended for the students to understand the preposition, not to be changed the definition for the preposition.
    Having said that, would, 'in a line parallel and close to', be a natural definition for 'along' in the following sentence?
    He drives her along the beach.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Re: in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

    Not really. That's appropriate for a line of trees along a road, a fringe of surf along a beach, and so on, where the trees or surf are not on the thing but next to it. It's not right for walking or driving on a beach or road. Also, 'along' allows following any kind of curve, not just a line.

  3. #3
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    Re: in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

    Quote Originally Posted by Thinking. Spain. View Post
    Hi teachers,
    The definition is just intended for the students to understand the preposition, not to be changed the definition for the preposition.
    Having said that, would, 'in a line parallel and close to', be a natural definition for 'along' in the following sentence?
    He drives her along the beach.

    Thanks in advance.
    I think a clue lies in the word along: this means 'the length of'. So we drive 'lengthwise' on the beach. As Entanglebank says, we could go in a zig-zag or curved path on the beach, but it would still be along its length.

  4. #4
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    Re: in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

    Quote Originally Posted by entangledbank View Post
    Not really. That's appropriate for a line of trees along a road, a fringe of surf along a beach, and so on, where the trees or surf are not on the thing but next to it. It's not right for walking or driving on a beach or road. Also, 'along' allows following any kind of curve, not just a line.
    Hi,
    Thanks for your reply. I thought it was a good one.
    How about, 'in a constant direction on / in a constant direction close to'? Would they one be appropriate?

    TS
    Last edited by Tenacious Learner; 3rd May 2013 at 1:36 PM. Reason: I add information

  5. #5
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    Re: in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

    Hi Elwintee,
    Thanks for your reply. It is a difficult one to be explained. Does 'the length of' mean 'the longitude of'?

    TS

  6. #6
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    Re: in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

    Yes, along is implicitly horizontal. It will also include a slight vertical element (e.g. along the hilly road) and it becomes a matter of judgement when along becomes "up/down". It is usual that along implies a greater distance than the width of the thing that you are travelling "along." It is also a matter of judgement when "along" becomes across. E.g. "Measure it along the left side" "Measure it across the left side."
    "There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn't."

  7. #7
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    Re: in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

    In answer to post #5 - No. I suggest you look up 'longitude' in the dictionary.

  8. #8
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    Re: in a line parallel and close to [definition for along?]

    Hi,
    Thanks for your help.
    According to the drawing, how about this one, 'in a direction parallel and close to'?

    Driving her. Beach.jpg

    TS

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