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Thread: something to do and somewhere to go

  1. #1
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    something to do and somewhere to go

    Hi, I guess I could reword this in English to make it come out sounding like Italian - but I was curious about how a native speaker might handle this. In English the parallel structure seems to emphasize the sense of being busy.

    I think "qualcosa da fare" is OK, but what about the second part?
    Context: informal email, describing a very busy week

    This week I had something to do and somewhere to go every day.
    Questa settimana c'era qualcosa da fare e ................. ogni giorno.

    Can I keep the parallel structure? or do I have to reword it - qualcosa da fare e posti in cui essere??? something like that?

    Thanks for your help!

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Ciao Joan, I write what comes in my mind as it comes:

    Questa settimana ho da fare e sono in giro tutti i giorni.

    Questa settimana ho da fare e da girare tutti i giorni.

    Take them for what they are worth...
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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    OK, thanks a lot, but I think I just realized I made another mistake. I meant "this week" in the sense of this week that just passed. So do I have to say "La settimana scorsa"???
    and can I change your sentence to the past like this:
    ...avevo da fare ...
    or .
    ...ho avuto da fare....

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Reprocessing...

    Questa settimana/la scorsa settimana ho avuto da fare e sono stato in giro tutti i giorni

    Questa settimana/la scorsa settimana ho avuto da fare e da girare tutti i giorni



    Tipically, if it Saturday or Sunday, I'd say questa settimana, if it is already Monday I'd say ​la scorsa settimana.
    Last edited by chipulukusu; 14th September 2013 at 12:15 AM.
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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Tipically, if it Saturday or Sunday, I'd say questa settimana, if it is already Monday I'd say ​la scorsa settimana.

    thanks for the tip! I'll keep that in mind.

    P.S. "typically" - hope you don't mind a tiny correction!

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Quote Originally Posted by joanvillafane View Post
    P.S. "typically" - hope you don't mind a tiny correction!
    Thank you Joan, I should have noticed that there were few legs in that word!
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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Quote Originally Posted by joanvillafane View Post
    This week I had something to do and somewhere to go every day.
    Sounds like my kind of holiday!

    E' stata una settimana impegnativa: giri e commissioni tutti i giorni.

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Hi and thanks, CPA - "giri" and "commissioni" are not words that I'm very familiar with - is "commissioni" ok for personal errands (not work-related)? Also - how is "giri" used in a sentence? I mean chip said "sono stato in giro" or "ho avuto da girare" but can I say "ho avuto tanti giri da fare" or is there some particular phrase that you use?
    Thanks!

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Quote Originally Posted by joanvillafane View Post
    can I say "ho avuto tanti giri da fare"!
    Yes, definitely
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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Hi J! Yes, "commissioni" is fine for personal errands.

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Spesso si parla di "sbrigare le commissioni" oppure "sbrigare diverse commissioni" oppure "avere delle commissioni da sbrigare." (anche, come conferma CPA, delle commissioni personali).
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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Another word for 'commissioni' is 'servizi', or at least it is in this part of Italy.

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Quote Originally Posted by london calling View Post
    Another word for 'commissioni' is 'servizi', or at least it is in this part of Italy.
    Maybe it's colloquial; I've never heard "servizi" used this way.
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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Quote Originally Posted by curiosone View Post
    Maybe it's colloquial; I've never heard "servizi" used this way.
    It is, see what Treccani says here, I quote:

    b. (fam.) [spec. al plur., incarico da portare a termine: ho molti s. da portare a termine] ≈ affare, commissione, faccenda, lavoro.

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Come London, anch'io sento comunemente da persone di Salerno e provincia servizio usato come commisisone

    "Per favore fammi questo servizio"
    è assolutamente comune per chiedere di fare una commisisone.

    Non mi sembra di averlo mai sentito da persone del Nord, dove potrebbe essere equivocato, in quanto credo che sia più comune il significato negativo di servizio come brutto tiro, come in "​mi hanno fatto un bel servizio!".
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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Concordo con Chip che "servizi" potrebbe essere frainteso. Nel liguaggio parlato credo che direi semplicemente "cose".

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    A Napoli anche, Chip (ci lavoro da 20 anni).

    Sono uscita a fare un servizio.
    I went out on an errand.

    Vengo in ufficio un po' più tardi oggi, ho dei servizi da fare.
    I'll be a little late coming to work this morning as I have a few things (leggi: errands) that need doing.

    Ecc.)

    Comunque, mi hanno fatto un bel servizio significa un brutto tiro anche qui.

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Al nord credo si parli più di servizio fotografico o servizio pubblico o (nelle strade di Bologna) anche qualche servizio sessuale...

    Altrimenti si parlerebbe di commissioni o cose da fare.
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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Quote Originally Posted by curiosone View Post
    Al nord credo si parli più di servizio fotografico o servizio pubblico o (nelle strade di Bologna) anche qualche servizio sessuale...Same in the South.;)

    Altrimenti si parlerebbe di commissioni o cose da fare.
    I agree that there seems to be a preference for the usage of one or the other term, but 'servizi' meaning errands is not considered either dialect or regional by the Treccani dictionary (it says 'fam' as you will have seen). And we do say 'commissioni' here as well.

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    Re: something to do and somewhere to go

    Quote Originally Posted by london calling View Post
    I agree that there seems to be a preference for the usage of one or the other term, but 'servizi' meaning errands is not considered either dialect or regional by the Treccani dictionary (it says 'fam' as you will have seen). And we do say 'commissioni' here as well.
    I'm not suggesting it's dialect, or not standard Italian, but Chipulukuso confirmed he'd never heard it used by people of the North, so there does seem to be a colloquial usage (or non-usage).

    This isn't the first time I've seen this happen. My husband (born in Como, whose father was Milanese and mother was Bolognese) taught me to use "braghe" as a synonym of "pantaloni", but many Italians aren't familiar with the term, and in Romagna they laugh, as "braghe" in Romagnolo dialect means "mutandoni."
    [and yes, there's already a thorough discussion of "braghe" here: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1986118 )
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