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Thread: All Slavic languages: brooding

  1. #21
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    Re: All Slavic languages: brooding

    Indeed so, there is another Russian word for hen: 'клуша' (klusha).
    Many thanks – this is most interesting; incidentally, according to the Oxford dictionary it actually means ‘broody hen’.
    Wouldn't 'клу́шка' be the diminutive of 'клуша'? If so, this would be very close to the Turkish word I mention. But is/was it ever used?

  2. #22
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    Re: All Slavic languages: brooding

    Klochka in Bulgarian means broody hen. Seems similar to the Turkish word.

  3. #23
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    Re: All Slavic languages: brooding

    Klochka in Bulgarian means broody hen. Seems similar to the Turkish word.
    Thank you very much - how do you write it in Bulgarian, please? Where is the stress?

    I think that кло́чка, if кло́чка it be, must correspond linguistically exactly to клу́шка - do you agree?
    Last edited by seitt; 14th November 2013 at 9:19 AM.

  4. #24
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    Re: All Slavic languages: brooding

    Quote Originally Posted by seitt View Post
    Thank you very much - how do you write it in Bulgarian, please? Where is the stress?
    The stress falls onto the first syllable (i.e. кло̀чка).

    Quote Originally Posted by seitt View Post
    I think that кло́чка, if кло́чка it be, must correspond linguistically exactly to клу́шка - do you agree?
    The exact equivalent would be клу̀ша—although it is seldom used.
    Actually, I think most or all of these are just onomatopœiae derived from кло̀к(ам), кльо̀к(ам), кло̀ч(а), клу̀ч(а), ква̀к(ам), ква̀ч(а), кло̀п(ам) and so on, much like the English words quack, cluck, cackle, gaggle, gabble, etc.

  5. #25
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    Re: All Slavic languages: brooding

    In BCS, 'broody hen' is only kvočka (there are possibly regional terms, but this is the only one widely used). Kokoš or kokoška is a hen generally.

  6. #26
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    Re: All Slavic languages: brooding

    Quote Originally Posted by seitt View Post
    Many thanks – this is most interesting; incidentally, according to the Oxford dictionary it actually means ‘broody hen’.
    Wouldn't 'клу́шка' be the diminutive of 'клуша'? If so, this would be very close to the Turkish word I mention. But is/was it ever used?
    Precisely, клушка is the diminitive of клуша. I have no idea how often or seldom it is used amidst farmers, but in a colloquial speech I heard клуша denoting figuratively a silly or narrow-minded woman, but then it would be a kind of offensive word, of course.

  7. #27
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    Re: All Slavic languages: brooding

    Quote Originally Posted by Duya View Post
    In BCS, 'broody hen' is only kvočka (there are possibly regional terms, but this is the only one widely used). Kokoš or kokoška is a hen generally.
    In Polish we also have the word kokoszka (a deminutive of kokosz) meaning hen, but it occurs only in some poems for children based on folklore.

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