Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 33 of 33

Thread: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Native language
    Русский
    Posts
    314

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by bibax View Post
    In Czech the simple answer Yes/No sounds incomplete (perhaps because we are taught in school to answer with the full sentence).
    I tried to think how we express agreement when we need to be formal, and I think that we mostly say things like совершенно верно, or справедливо, or согласен с вами ("very true", "I agree with you"). Answering with the full sentence is good from the academic point of view (it helps to avoid ambiguity and compels people to express what they really think), but it is not a requirement of politeness, so few people ever do that, unless they indeed need to be precise. Answering with a bare verb is a colloquial form of speaking, anyway. Overall, with expressing agreement, the usual rule applies: "there is more than one way to say it".

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Native language
    Czech
    Posts
    2,043

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Словеса View Post
    Answering with the full sentence is good from the academic point of view (it helps to avoid ambiguity and compels people to express what they really think), but it is not a requirement of politeness, so few people ever do that, unless they indeed need to be precise.
    Answering with the full sentence would certainly prevent many air disasters.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Native language
    Vietnamese
    Age
    19
    Posts
    359

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Словеса View Post
    In Vietnamese, there is no conjugation and there are no verbal tenses or verbal persons, so I suppose it's not the same for them… Though it is better to ask Radioh for clarifications (is it just a bare verb word, or something else has to accompany it). I suppose that it may be any way, including one cited by Dreamer: there are close to no limits for grammar.
    PS: cross-posted. Thank you, Radioh!
    You are right, Словеса It's just a bare verb; nothing accompanies it. And you're also right that Vietnamese has no verb tenses nor conjugation. As for auxiliary, we don't have the helping verb "do" but we have "sẽ", which means will/shall. Ah,... You're very welcome
    Life is beautiful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Native language
    Greek
    Age
    45
    Posts
    2,373

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Maroseika View Post
    This is very common way to answer in Russian (probably, in other Slavic languages, too). In many cases simple answer "yes" or "no" would sound too formal or cold.
    I suspect this is mostly peculiar to the languages with personal endings (or other indicators) of the verbs and free order of verbs.
    Similarly in Greek as well, a few examples in past, present and future tenses:

    -«Με ακούς;» [me a'kus?] --> do you hear me?
    -«Ακούω» [a'ku.o] --> I hear.

    -«Μπορείς να πάς;» [bo'ris na pas?] --> can you go?
    -«Μπορώ» [bo'ro] --> I can

    -«Πήρες τον τεχνίτη;» ['pires ton te'xniti?] --> did you call the handyman?
    -«Πήρα» ['pira] --> I called

    -«Θα έρθεις στη δεξίωση;» [θa 'erθis sti ðe'ksi.osi?] --> wiil you come to the party?
    -«Θα έρθω» [θa 'erθo] --> I'll come

    I agree with Gavril, in languages with conjugated verbs according to the person, it's normal to repeat the verb of the question when giving an affirmative answer. And I agree with Maroseika too, a simple yes or no would sound too formal or cold.
    Les Grecs sont étonnants dans l'adversité - François Pouqueville

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Native language
    Русский
    Posts
    314

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by apmoy70 View Post
    And I agree with Maroseika too, a simple yes or no would [he said, could] sound too formal or cold.
    Just like the repetition of a bare verb could.
    I agree with Gavril, in languages with conjugated verbs according to the person, it's normal to repeat the verb of the question when giving an affirmative answer.
    Why do you think it depends on this? There are not enough data even to establish correlation, let alone causation.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Native language
    English
    Posts
    45

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Just so you don’t get too confused, I omitted the personal pronouns in my examples in order to portray more accurately the way I thought affirmative responses were given in other languages. None of the dialogues in my first post were meant to reproduce what would come naturally to a native English speaker. In many other languages, where there is a separate verb conjugation for each personal pronoun, the latter is usually omitted because it is implied in the verb endings. In English, that is simply not possible, but I transplanted this formula onto my examples to showcase what turned out to be a reality in many languages.

    Having said that, it seems that English, especially the American variety, is indeed unique among world languages in how closed-ended questions are handled. Compared to what has been said so far on this thread, “Yes” and “No” are extremely common in everyday conversation, even as standalone words. Phrases involving auxiliary verbs can be repeated without saying “Yes” or “No,” but the intonation is either more solemn or, conversely, more hysterical (see the examples from my previous posts). Echoing notional verbs while dropping both markers and auxiliary verbs, not to mention personal pronouns, is simply unheard of in English, even in the myriad regional dialects. It looks like the opposite is the case in most other languages, though.

    However, I was also wondering if the same applied to subjects and objects rather than verbs. Consider the following dialogues, one of which I had mentioned previously:

    QUESTION: Are you at the department store?
    ANSWER: At the department store.

    QUESTION: Are you there?
    ANSWER: There.

    QUESTION: Is the painting up on the wall?
    ANSWER: Up on the wall.

    Does the same principle apply to nouns and adverbs as well as notional verbs in your language?
    Last edited by DreamerX; 4th July 2014 at 7:06 AM.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Moscow, Russia
    Native language
    Russian
    Posts
    1,827

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by DreamerX View Post
    QUESTION: Are you at the department store?
    ANSWER: At the department store.

    QUESTION: Are you there?
    ANSWER: There.

    QUESTION: Is the painting up on the wall?
    ANSWER: Up on the wall.

    Does the same principle apply to nouns and adverbs as well as notional verbs in your language?
    Of course. Applies
    Please correct my mistakes wherever possible.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Australia
    Native language
    Vietnamese
    Age
    19
    Posts
    359

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by DreamerX View Post
    ...
    QUESTION: Are you at the department store?
    ANSWER: At the department store.

    QUESTION: Are you there?
    ANSWER: There.

    QUESTION: Is the painting up on the wall?
    ANSWER: Up on the wall.

    Does the same principle apply to nouns and adverbs as well as notional verbs in your language?
    These answers do not sound natural for me though my younger brother uses them all the time. But I can say "up on the wall (already)" if asked "Have you hung the painting up on the wall yet ?".
    Life is beautiful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Native language
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Posts
    28,006

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Gavril View Post
    There are also languages in which non-auxiliary verbs are "echoed" when answering questions: e.g., I think in Portuguese you could say

    A: Você achou o seu celular? "Did you find your cellphone?"
    B: Achei. "(Yes,) I found (it)"
    Quite correct. That's probably the most common way to reply to a question. (And a tell-tale mistake of Portuguese speakers in other languages like English.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Maroseika View Post
    This is very common way to answer in Russian (probably, in other Slavic languages, too). In many cases simple answer "yes" or "no" would sound too formal or cold.
    I would say exactly the same about Portuguese. Just "yes" or (a bit less so) just "no" comes off as blunt.

    P.S. I think the word "emphatic" was a bit misapplied in the title of this thread, but as a matter of fact in Portuguese we even reduplicate the verb when we really want to reiterate something in the reply to a question. For example:

    "Did you hear that?"
    "I sure did!"

    «Ouviste aquilo?»
    «Ouvi, ouvi!» [I heard, I heard!]


    "She didn't say that..."
    "Oh, yes, she did!"

    «Ela não disse isso...!»
    «Disse, disse!» [She said, she said!]
    Last edited by Outsider; 19th July 2014 at 10:54 PM.
    Deuparth gwaith yw ei ddechrau.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Native language
    Русский
    Posts
    314

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Maroseika View Post
    In Russian […] due to the free order such phrases as "Called." do not look unnatural, like in English […]
    No connection, in my opinion.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Native language
    Русский
    Posts
    314

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Outsider View Post
    (And a tell-tale mistake of Portuguese speakers in other languages like English.)
    There are no such mistakes by Russians, of course.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Paris, France
    Native language
    English (Ireland)
    Age
    27
    Posts
    3,934

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by sound shift View Post
    I've heard that Irish (Gaelic, not English) doesn't possess the word "Yes".
    That is correct, there are no single words for Yes and No in Irish (or Scottish Gaelic), which is why when speaking English, Irish people will often repeat the verb instead of merely saying yes or no.

    Are you coming later?
    I am.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Derby (central England)
    Native language
    English - England
    Age
    59
    Posts
    30,443

    Re: Emphatic repetition instead of "yes"

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro y La Torre View Post
    Are you coming later?
    I am.
    Or "I am, to be sure."
    It's the short words that get you.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •