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Thread: Proverbs/Refranes

  1. #41
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    I think the "Description/explanation" column should be made permanently visible, instead of the English one, otherwise it's hard to see which is the last row.

    Anyways, I've added some new English expressions, as well as a bunch of Russian translations.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #42
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    I am a dunce. I am dying to see the glossary, but I can't get to it. Can someone explain how to see it?
    We all have typos once in a while. Be nice----Todos cometemos errores de dedo. Ten paciencia.

  3. #43
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Hola Keilah,
    Simplemente haz clic donde pone 'Attached files'- Refranes Proverbs v10, luego tienes la opción de abrirlo o guardarlo a tu ordenador.

  4. #44
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    Florida - United States
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    I added some translations in french.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  5. #45
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Hello everybody,

    I have a list of Greek proverbs, but to be honest I am not quite sure that they translate exactly into any of the others. I know their English translation, but I am not sure that I should post them in the attachment because i'm uncertain with how to connect them to their possible equivalents. I'm going to post them here with their translations, and if anybody has any ideas about which pre-existing sayings they could be connected with, let me know and I will post them in the attachment.

    Όποιος δέν έχει μυαλό έχει ποδάρια
    He who has no brain has feet.
    (My interpretation: if you don't have smarts to succeed, you must have feet (strength) for manual labor.)

    Από μικρό καί από τρελλό μαθαίνει την αλήθεια
    From the small and the crazy we learn the truth
    (My interpretation: fairly self-explanatory, children and crazy people don't have the manner to lie)

    Καθαρός ουρανός αστραπές δέν φοβάται
    A clear sky does not fear lightning
    (My interpretation: one who is of clear conscience should not have fear)

    Μπρός γκρεμνός καί πίσω ρεύμα
    In front of a cliff and behind a wave
    (My interpretation: between a rock and a hard place)

    Ο κλέφτης καί ο ψεύτης τόν πρώτον χρόνουν χαίρονται
    The thief and the liar celebrate the first of the year
    (My interpretation: not really sure about this one....)

    Οσα δέν φτάνει η αλεπού τα κάνει κρεμαστάρια
    The fox who doesn't arrive makes the hunt
    (My interpretation: to have sour grapes)

    Καλύτερα να βγεί το μάτι σου παρά το όνομα σου
    It is better that your eye come out than your name
    (My interpretation: A bad name is the worst thing one can have)

    Όποιος βιάζεται οκοντάφτει
    He who hurries, trips
    (My interpretation: fairly self-explanatory)

    Ο βρεγμένος την βρόχη δέν την φοβάται
    The wet do not fear the rain
    (My interpretation: Once you have been through something, it becomes trivial)

    I hope that these are enjoyed, and once again apologies for not posting them in the attachment, but I promise that I will attach them if I could have some help with which existing proverbs they most closely resemble. If nobody thinks that they resemble any proverbs already listed, I will create new english transliterations and meanings. Thanks!
    Last edited by CrepiIlLupo; 19th February 2007 at 11:18 PM. Reason: error

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    "Show me a caring capitalist and I'll show you a vegetarian wolf".

  7. #47
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    Aqui y alla
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Sorry I can't translate.

    Perro ladrador poco mordedor.
    En boca cerrada no entran moscas.
    Mas sabe el zorro por viejo,que por zorro.
    No hay mal que por bien no venga.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Austria - Austrian ;-)
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    12

    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Hi!

    I added some German/Austrian translations and new proverbs.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    Colombia/Español
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Hay una discusión interesante sobre The birds of a feather flock together
    (Varias versiones del refrán en español: Dios los cría y ellos se juntan, o son pájaros del mismo plumaje, o Dios los cría y el diablo los junta, o el que anda con lobos a aullar se enseña)

    Saludos
    Sinclair001

  10. #50
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Quote Originally Posted by difficult cuss View Post
    Olegaria,


    Amatus,

    What does this mean...The clever girl spins with the leg of a donkey? is it translated correctly?
    I don't see that anyone has responded to this, dc. Maybe because the meaning seems clear; at the risk of stating the obvious I read it as:
    A clever, resourceful person can do with whatever is available (like some people who like to tinker and putter around have the ability to make up their tools at the moment from whatever is lying around).
    Actually, this translation sounds pretty crisp an concise to me; as such
    it might as well be an English proverb; i like it.
    saludos
    Last edited by Bonjules; 11th May 2007 at 6:28 PM. Reason: spelling
    Chien qui pète, joie sur ma tête

  11. #51
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    Aug 2005
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    Y aquí viene:
    "It never rains, but it pours"
    Las desgracias nunca vienen solas
    Siempre llueve sobre mojado
    A perro flaco todo son pulgas
    Nunca llueve a gusto de todos


    Y este otro
    "God shapes the back for the burden"
    Dios que da la llaga, da la medicina
    Dios aprieta pero no ahorca
    Dios no nos exige más de lo que podemos hacer

    También
    "Cross my heart and strike me blind"
    Por estas que son cruces, lo juro.
    Me acuerdo de una frase en una película com variante de esto en que un protagonista decía "You can cross my heart" que creo que está relacionada con esta frase.

    Este es un clásico
    "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"
    Más vale prevenir que lamentar
    Más vale prevenir que curar

    Este otro es de índole familiar, del cual seguramente existen otras interpretaciones y versiones, aca vá:
    "Apple does not fall far from the tree"
    De tal palo, tal astilla

    Más de índole familiar
    "Blood is thicker than water"
    La familia/sangre tira mucho

    A propósito de relaciones humanas
    "A friend in need is a friend indeed"
    Amigo en la adversidad, amigo de verdad.

    Este que se le atribuye a Erasmo de Rotterdam
    “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth.”
    A caballo regalado, no se le ve el colmillo.
    Last edited by Jana337; 28th May 2007 at 9:04 PM. Reason: merged

  12. #52
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Añadí una serie de refranes que estoy estudiando todos con frases nominales puras.
    Seguiré en sucesivas entregas.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  13. #53
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonjules View Post
    Hello all,
    Quote Originally Posted by Venezuelan_sweetie View Post
    Hey!

    - El hábito no hace al monje --> The habit doesn't make the monk (something li

    - Aunque la mona se vista de seda, mona se queda --> Even if the (female) monkey wears silk, she is still a monkey.
    I'd vote for the 'generic' version (male gender -sorry- for
    all cases):
    Aunque mono se vista de seda, mono se queda.
    saludos
    Last edited by catlady60; 16th June 2010 at 3:02 AM. Reason: I put my proverb in the quote

  14. #54
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    If you put lipstick on a pig, it's still a pig.

  15. #55
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Quote Originally Posted by catlady60 View Post
    I'd vote for the 'generic' version (male gender -sorry- for
    all cases):
    Aunque mono se vista de seda, mono se queda.
    saludos
    Sorry but that makes no sense to me. Proverbs are set phrases, and I don't see a good reason to change the gender of that word to the masculine.
    Prendre un dictionnaire, barrer tous les mots à barrer, signer : revu et corrigé. [Marcel Duchamp]

  16. #56
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Quote Originally Posted by swift View Post
    Sorry but that makes no sense to me. Proverbs are set phrases, and I don't see a good reason to change the gender of that word to the masculine.
    The true English equivalent: A leopard doesn't change its spots.
    No matter how much the cats fight, there always seem to be plenty of kittens. -- Abraham Lincoln

  17. #57
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    Re: Proverbs/Refranes

    Quote Originally Posted by swift View Post
    Sorry but that makes no sense to me. Proverbs are set phrases, and I don't see a good reason to change the gender of that word to the masculine.
    Maybe you are quite right in that in the 'original' version only 'mona' was used.
    To me that doesn't make much sense since the problem affects both sexes equally, I'd suppose. In that sense it is 'sexist'.
    I also think that the sequence o-a-o-a sounds better than a-a-a-a, but that is of course a matter if individual taste.
    saludos
    Chien qui pète, joie sur ma tête

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