Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: good odds

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Native language
    korean
    Posts
    1,546

    good odds

    What is the meaning of good odds in the follwoing sentence?

    "That's pretty good odd," she says. " you have more change of getting hurt in a traffic accident than you do skydiving."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Native language
    inglese | English
    Posts
    1,055

    Re: good odds

    It means that you have a higher chance (or a higher likelihood) of getting hurt in a traffic accident than skydiving.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Native language
    English (UK) New Zealand
    Posts
    1,591

    Re: good odds

    Quote Originally Posted by DesertCat View Post
    It means that you have a higher chance (or a higher likelihood) of getting hurt in a traffic accident than while skydiving.
    I just think you should include "while" or it looks odd...

    Vicky
    "I'm just a mouth on legs." Tegan Jovanka, Doctor Who.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Native language
    US - American English
    Posts
    7,777

    Re: good odds

    The noun "odds" is defined in the OED as the "balance of probability in favour of something happening or being the case."

    Therefore "good odds" suggests a high probability.

    You can say the same thing replacing "odds" with "chances."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Native language
    inglese | English
    Posts
    1,055

    Re: good odds

    It seems fine to me without the while. If I say "You're more likely to get hurt in a car accident than skydiving" or "You're more likely to get hurt driving than skydiving" do you still think it needs while?


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Native language
    korean
    Posts
    1,546

    Re: good odds

    Let me make it clear. The original sentence is as follows:

    She had only three malfuncations in which she had to depend on a second, reserve chute. " That is pretty good odds,' she says. " You have more chance of getting hurt in a traffic accident than you do skydiving.
    Again, what does it mean by " That is pretty good odds"?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Native language
    inglese | English
    Posts
    1,055

    Re: good odds

    Bosun, we answered that question in #2 and #4.


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    buried under organic chem text books
    Native language
    english/usa
    Age
    27
    Posts
    609

    Re: good odds

    I would say that it means that because she only had to go to the reserve chute a few times out of (assumed) many; it's probable (pretty good odds) that you'd survive skydiving without having to go to the reserve chute.

    I'd also say those are pretty good odds.

    Pretty good odds is a high probability or a favorable probability or chance, which is more like it.
    In tennis the addict moves about a hard rectangle and seeks to ambush a fuzzy ball with a modified snow-shoe. ~Elliot Chaze

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Native language
    English (UK) New Zealand
    Posts
    1,591

    Re: good odds

    Quote Originally Posted by DesertCat View Post
    It seems fine to me without the while. If I say "You're more likely to get hurt in a car accident than skydiving" or "You're more likely to get hurt driving than skydiving" do you still think it needs while?
    Maybe it's just me, but it sounds odd, as if something has been left out.

    Vicky
    "I'm just a mouth on legs." Tegan Jovanka, Doctor Who.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Native language
    High German/Danish
    Posts
    2,362

    Re: good odds

    Quote Originally Posted by bosun View Post
    What is the meaning of good odds in the follwoing sentence?

    "That's pretty good odd," she says. " you have more change of getting hurt in a traffic accident than you do skydiving."

    One useful information that nobody seems to care of is that the word is widely used in the betting business - in several languages.

    So if you have been to the races - horses or bicycle - I would not be surprised if you had come across it even in Korea or Japan:

    Odds 5:1 as winner - meaning you place a bet of 1 Euro and gets back 5 if your rider or horse wins.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    California, USA
    Native language
    English, USA
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,549

    Re: good odds

    "That's pretty good odds," she says. " you have more chance of getting hurt in a traffic accident than you do skydiving."

    "Good odds" does refer to betting. To get very basic, the sentance means that you are less likely to get hurt skydiving that driving. By saying this is "good odds", the person who wrote this believes that it is a relatively safe activity. (I disagree, since getting into a car accident can pretty likely depending on how much one drives, but...that's irrelevant to the meaning here.)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Belfast, Ireland
    Native language
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Age
    67
    Posts
    48,897

    Re: good odds

    The expression "good odds" is an opinion about the probability of something. Good only means favourable.

    So, good odds in the context of a chance event that may kill you would be a lower than expected probability.

    Good odds in the context of winning the lottery would be a higher than expected probability.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •