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Thread: Stammi bene

  1. #41
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    Re: stammi bene

    But "stammi bene a sentire" means more or less "now listen to me, and listen good!" - with a touch of agressivity.

    IC

  2. #42
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    Re: stammi bene

    Please don't forget to take a look at the old threads

    Stammi bene
    Stammi bene e fatti vivo

    Brevity is the soul of wit - Le persone intelligenti hanno il dono della concisione

  3. #43
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    Re: stammi bene

    so how would you say in the polite for "take care", like to a teacher, or an acquaintance?

    do you use "stammi bene" to say take care to a friend, for example, in the informal way?

    thanks for clearing it up for me!

  4. #44
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    Re: stammi bene

    To a teacher or an acquaintance you should say "Mi stia bene"

  5. #45
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    Re: stammi bene

    Hi "stammi bene" is tipical italian: "I am interested in you feeling well", very familiar and friendly.
    Note that "stammi bene a sentire" becomes more agressive, and means "now you listen to me"
    But in both cases there is not a litteral translation from italian to english.
    Ciao ciao
    Sil66

  6. #46
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    Re: Stammi bene

    Ciao,

    The two English colloquialisms I would equate to "in gamba" would be "sharp" oppure "on the ball"

    Comunque, l'ho imparato io cosi'...

    GS
    Per l'esperienza di questa Dolce Vita...

  7. #47
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    Re: Stammi bene

    ciao a tutti,
    it means also "Get well soon"

  8. #48
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    Re: Stammi bene

    @Tripolino :

    Get well soon = riprenditi, guarisci

    Stai bene/riguardati = Keep fit, keep well, take care of yourself

    Ci vediamo e stammi bene = See you soon and take care.
    I am what I am and what I am needs no excuses!

  9. #49
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    Re: Stammi bene

    Quote Originally Posted by Silvia B View Post
    My pigtail, just a few notes:
    "in gamba" sounds a bit strange... I mean, I've never heard anybody using that word while leaving someone, but maybe somewhere in Italy it is used with this meaning. Seems like a dialectical way of greeting someone. I dare say that it could even come from north Italy, where I live..but, if so, I definetely think it is really old fashioned!!
    My friends often tell me something like "in gamba" or "mi raccomando", but I think it's too formal, I don't like it so much... I agree with you, it sounds definetely strange! Maybe, it's slang. Anyway, I would never use it!
    Vi prego di correggere ogni minima imperfezione in quel che scrivo! Italiano o inglese che sia.

  10. #50
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    Re: stammi bene

    When you say, "stammi bene a sentire" would you congigate sentire or there is no need because it is already conj with stammi?

  11. #51
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    Re: stammi bene

    Quote Originally Posted by marialdina27 View Post
    When you say, "stammi bene a sentire" would you congigate sentire or there is no need because it is already conj with stammi?
    Exactly, the command is carried in the imperative (in stammi) and the thing after is connected so the infinitive is used.
    Like in English:

    Take care to clean all of the car...

    We have the 'take care' as the command so 'to clean' can just be used in the infinitive, but in English we can have conjugations like "Make sure you do it later" or "Make sure to do it later" so it's a little more flexible, in Italian it's a common theme to only conjugate once if you don't need to do it again, in English we can say "I hope I do it" where the second verb (to do) is conjugated again whereas in Italian it wouldn't be.. "spero di farlo" (farlo = infinitive + lo).
    Last edited by Alxmrphi; 24th December 2009 at 6:48 PM.

  12. #52
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    Re: Stammi bene

    grazie a tutti, adesso capisco bene la significa stammi bene.

  13. #53
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    Re: Stammi bene

    Quote Originally Posted by FFC View Post
    My friends often tell me something like "in gamba" or "mi raccomando", but I think it's too formal, I don't like it so much... I agree with you, it sounds definetely strange! Maybe, it's slang. Anyway, I would never use it!
    Mi raccomando and in gamba are not formal at all. On the contrary, they both are usually uttered in informal conversation. They are not slang nor old-fashioned. I hear and use them fairly often but only with my friends.
    Last edited by Astropolyp; 13th July 2010 at 7:40 AM.

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