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Thread: Ragazzo vs. fidanzato

  1. #1
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    Ragazzo vs. fidanzato

    Hi all,

    What word is the most common when talking about your boyfriend with who you´ve been together for a long time. I´m not sure what is the difference between words ragazzo and fidanzato!

    Grazie mille
    Mari

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    It's the same. Maybe in spoken language, and in a more informal context, we use "ragazzo" the most.

    Ciao!
    Silvia

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Grazie Silvia!

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    I would add that "fidanzato" is more often used when there's a formal engagement.
    For this reason, boys do often shiver when they are called "fidanzato" by their girlfriends, and girls get angry when their boyfriends go on calling them "ragazza" too long. (just kiddin'... )
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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Giocc, do you actually think there still is this difference between ragazzo and fidanzato?

    I hear everybody using both and meaning the same nowadays..or at least here, where I live..
    Silvia

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Yes, Silvia, definitely. It's only a nuance, but still it is there. (I live near Milan, BTW).
    In my post I was joking about it, but at times it actually happens to see a frown on someone's face when you say "fidanzato/a" in place of "ragazzo/a" or the opposite.
    Around here, "moroso/a" is also used for ragazzo/a.

    Ciao
    Please DO shoot the piano player - that's why I'm here

    If we weren't all crazy, we would go insane. (1977)


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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Around here, "moroso/a" is also used for ragazzo/a.
    Yes, here it is used too. I wanted to add it but I didn't know whether it was the case or not. I think it is just a dialectil form and maybe it is not at all used in other parts of Italy?
    Silvia

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Doesn't 'fidanzato' also mean 'fiancè', ie 'engaged to be married'. In English there is a distinct difference between the two so if I heard 'fidanzato' I would assume that person was engaged?

    Che ne pensate?

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Quote Originally Posted by shamblesuk
    Doesn't 'fidanzato' also mean 'fiancè', ie 'engaged to be married'. In English there is a distinct difference between the two so if I heard 'fidanzato' I would assume that person was engaged?

    Che ne pensate?
    Yes, this was the original "proper" meaning, which is still fully used.
    Whenever it is used in a more informal way, in my opinion it still conveys the idea of a "serious" or formal engagement, while in Silvia's opinion it doesn't any longer.

    Silvia: yes, you are right. I listed it to make it known, but it rather belongs to northern area dialects, so it may not be fully advisable to use it unless you explicitly intend to.

    Ciao
    Please DO shoot the piano player - that's why I'm here

    If we weren't all crazy, we would go insane. (1977)


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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Well, that is the meaning, it's true.

    But nowadays we use them both to refer to "boyfriend"...as Giocc said it is just a nuance..depends if you want to stress this nuance or not.
    I would call my boyfriend "fidanzato" without meaning that we are going to get married soon.
    But, actually, among my friend I would never use the word "fidanzato"... "ragazzo" is surely the most used in informal conversations.
    In a formal conversation, maybe, I would use "fidanzato"...

    Well, but let's say that it depends on how people prefer to call it...
    Silvia

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    What about slightly older people? Surely a woman, let's say in her 30's or 40's doesn't call the man she's been dating "mio ragazzo," and she is not his "ragazza"?
    That's an L (Lsp)

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Quote Originally Posted by Mari_Susanna
    Hi all,

    What word is the most common when talking about your boyfriend with who you´ve been together for a long time?
    Il mio ex. Then, if you want to explain further, you can say: il ragazzo con cui stavo prima (literally the boyfriend with whom I used to stay before, as opposed to the one you're with now, not necessarily though, I mean you can use it even if you don't have a new boyfriend).
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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Quote Originally Posted by lsp
    What about slightly older people? Surely a woman, let's say in her 30's or 40's doesn't call the man she's been dating "mio ragazzo," and she is not his "ragazza"?
    Well, maybe you can call him "il mio uomo" or her "la mia donna", but I do not hear it very often.
    If you live togheter you can say "il mio compagno"or "la mia compagna" (how is in AE "significative other?").
    However, often you can hear "il mio/la mia partner".
    Last edited by Elisa68; 1st September 2005 at 2:08 PM. Reason: typo

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Quote Originally Posted by Silvia
    Il mio ex. Then, if you want to explain further, you can say: il ragazzo con cui stavo prima (literally the boyfriend with whom I used to stay before, as opposed to the one you're with now, not necessarily though, I mean you can use it even if you don't have a new boyfriend).
    Hi,

    I ment the boyfriend with who i´m now, a person who has been my boyfriend for a long time. Sorry if the explanation was unclear

    I was just asking this cause when i met italian people and told them that my boyfriend is italian using the word ragazzo, they told me to use the word fidanzato. They told that ragazzo is more like someone u see once in while and you´re not together with him. Or then my italian is really bad and i missunderstood what they said So that´s why i wanted to hear more opinions about this! Thank´s for the answers!

    Mari

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Quote Originally Posted by Mari_Susanna
    Hi,

    I ment the boyfriend with who i´m now, a person who has been my boyfriend for a long time. Sorry if the explanation was unclear

    I was just asking this cause when i met italian people and told them that my boyfriend is italian using the word ragazzo, they told me to use the word fidanzato. They told that ragazzo is more like someone u see once in while and you´re not together with him. Or then my italian is really bad and i missunderstood what they said So that´s why i wanted to hear more opinions about this! Thank´s for the answers!

    Mari
    Depends on the people you have around you..and maybe on how old you are.
    Anyway, what everybody told you is correct, so if they want to specify that yours is a really serious relationship...yes, so call him "fidanzato". But remember "ragazzo" doesn't necessarily means that you've been together for just a month!
    Silvia

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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Quote Originally Posted by Mari_Susanna
    Hi,

    I ment the boyfriend with who i´m now, a person who has been my boyfriend for a long time. Sorry if the explanation was unclear
    Oh, my fault! I misread!

    I guess you can choose the best word depending on whom you're talking to: if you're talking to people your age, then go for ragazzo, if they are older people, then go for fidanzato. This is just a general rule and as an indication.
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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Add to the worthy "general rule" of Silvia, also partner and compagno.

  18. #18
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    Re: Ragazzo/fidanzato

    Diciamo anche, quando 2 persone hanno una relazione, "è un mio amico/è una mia amica".

  19. #19
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    fidanzato

    Italians use this (I think)for people together for perhaps many years but may or may not have plans to marry. Vero?
    In English (AE) engaged is used by people who are definitely planning to marry in the near future.
    Therefore , fidanzato would we say boy/girlfriend, partner,significant other etc.?

  20. #20
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    Re: fidanzato

    Yes, the word fidanzato/a doesn't necessary imply that people have plans to marry. Fidanzato/a is the correspondent of boy/girlfriend.

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