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Thread: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

  1. #61
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    If I may, I believe I see a difference
    Quote Originally Posted by brian8733 View Post
    I didn't think you were coming --> I thought you weren't coming. But don't ask me why.
    I didn't think you were coming - It didn't occur to me that you might come.
    I thought you weren't coming. - I did think about it and concluded that you wouldn't come.
    Regards
    Eu vim para confundir e não para explicar - Abelardo Barbosa (Chacrinha)

  2. #62
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    Quote Originally Posted by coolbrowne View Post
    If I may, I believe I see a difference
    I didn't think you were coming - It didn't occur to me that you might come.
    I thought you weren't coming. - I did think about it and concluded that you wouldn't come.
    Regards
    Yes, in some cases there are actual differences in meaning. Here I suppose you're right.

  3. #63
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    Hmm... I don't see that difference. I think I didn't think you were coming also means that I concluded you weren't come.

    If I wanted to say that it didn't occur to me that you might/would come, I'd say I didn't know you were coming.
    "I don't give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way."

  4. #64
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    Quote Originally Posted by brian8733 View Post
    Hmm... I don't see that difference. I think I didn't think you were coming also means that I concluded you weren't come.

    If I wanted to say that it didn't occur to me that you might/would come, I'd say I didn't know you were coming.
    I agree. I would use either in that situation.

  5. #65
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    Is it ever, in any event, sentirselo, rather than sentirsela? Also, is there a rule for why it's sentirseLA?

    thank you

    Ann

  6. #66
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    Quote Originally Posted by maurine View Post
    Is it ever, in any event, sentirselo, rather than sentirsela? Also, is there a rule for why it's sentirseLA?

    thank you

    Ann
    "Sentirsela" is a fixed idiomatic expression.

    There is no "rule," but, perhaps, a possible explanation could be that it implies questa cosa, which is feminine (i.e., Non mi sento di fare questa cosa.à Non me la sento.).

    PS; "Sentirselo" can be used to suggest the idea of "going numb" in sentences such as Non mi sento più il braccio! Non me lo sento più! ("I can't feel my arm any more! I can't feel it any more.") That is because braccio is masculine.

  7. #67
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    thanks, what about when a verb is involved. Like, "non mi sento di uscire stasera", granted it might not be grammatically correct, but would Italians say, "non me lo sento di uscire"? Would a verb be = lo? thanks again

  8. #68
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    Quote Originally Posted by maurine View Post
    thanks, what about when a verb is involved. Like, "non mi sento di uscire stasera", granted it might not be grammatically correct, but would Italians say, "non me lo sento di uscire"? Would a verb be = lo? thanks again
    Even in that case, we would say non me la sento (e.g. Non me la sento di uscire.)

    It is always la.

    One could also say: Non mi va di uscire.

    Another option os: Non ho voglia di uscire.
    Last edited by Roberto1976; 3rd March 2009 at 7:39 PM.

  9. #69
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    Even if a di + infinitive clause follows, you can still say Non me la sento di... and I guess la would technically be considered "pleonastico."
    "I don't give a damn for a man that can only spell a word one way."

  10. #70
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    Quote Originally Posted by brian8733 View Post
    Even if a di + infinitive clause follows, you can still say Non me la sento di... and I guess la would technically be considered "pleonastico."
    Sì, verissimo: in italiano si fa grande uso dei pronomi pleonastici che, allo stesso tempo, vengono spesso anche duramente stigmatizzati, come nel caso di a me mi.

  11. #71
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    Re: sentirsela di - sentirsi di

    HERE the thread about "a me mi" in SI...
    -Fermi o spariamo! -Okay, sparite.

  12. #72
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    Re: non me la sento

    Quote Originally Posted by Einstein View Post
    I don't feel up to doing something/I don't think I can do something = non ce la faccio, non ne sono in grado, non me la sento per qualche motivo
    Non me la sento di tagliare l'erba oggi (perchè ho mal di testa/fa troppo caldo) = I don't feel up to mowing the lawn today/ I don't think I can mow the lawn today
    I don't feel like doing something/I can't be bothered to do something = non ne ho voglia/non mi va di
    Non ho voglia di tagliare l'erba oggi (non mi va, mi sento pigro) = I don't feel like mowing the lawn today/I can't be bothered to mow the lawn today.

    Brevity is the soul of wit - Le persone intelligenti hanno il dono della concisione

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