Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 36 of 36

Thread: Dum Spiro Spero

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Native language
    English - UK
    Age
    26
    Posts
    5

    Re: Latin: Dum Spiro Spero

    Heya,

    Although not a particularly accurate translation, "There is hope whilst I yet breathe" seems to sum up the concept.

    SD
    Last edited by Singe dansant; 6th January 2006 at 12:51 AM. Reason: I don't like the way I worded this...

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    jiā tàiluó ní yà
    Native language
    Català & español (Spain)
    Age
    35
    Posts
    15,174

    Re: Latin: Dum Spiro Spero

    Whoever forged this saying, played with words and sounds. He used the paranomasia: "Dum spiro spero". It worked in Latin, but it may not work in a translation, so, maybe the literal translation is not the best one.

    The author of it used also a methonymy, he took one characteristic of living creatures (breathing) to name the whole thing (life).

    So, actually, the simplest translation of it is "While there is life, there is hope", as Dinis has said.
    Dale un pez y comerá un día, dale una caña y pedirá una tapa.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Stuttgart- Germany
    Native language
    Italian-Italy
    Posts
    460

    Re: Latin: Dum Spiro Spero

    Quote Originally Posted by littlejack
    However, there seems to be some confusion about who said it, I thought it was Publius Ovidius Naso, but I'm not so sure anymore, it was a long time ago when I learnt these things... It bugs me now, so anyone knows for sure? Any Web references? I checked a few sites, but it either came back that it is a prowerb, or inconclusive. Any ideas on the origin?
    This sentence if found in the works of Cicero and in the works of Ovidius, but the first one is the more ancient, so Cicero used it for the first time (letters to Atticum).

    Ciao

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Native language
    English,USA
    Posts
    1

    Re: Latin: Dum Spiro Spero

    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgiaL
    Does anyone know what the English translation is for the Latin phrase above?
    The translation is "While I breathe, I hope." And all latin should be lower case..."dum spiro, spero." Hope this helps you.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Native language
    Spanish
    Posts
    6

    Information about 'Dum Spiro, Spero' :)

    Hola! Hello!

    Ultimamente, he estado buscando información sobre algunos proverbios latinos, porque la verdad, me parecen bastante interesantes. Y hace poco encontré 'Dum Spiro, Spero', 'Mientras respire, tendré esperanza' y como soy
    muy cuiriosa, he estado buscando informacion sobre esta frase, sobre el escritor (Ciceron), sobre el libro o contexto en el que aparece, y el por qué de esta frase, pero no sé por qué, pero no he encontrado nada, o casi nada,
    realmente interesante sobre la 'historia' de esta frase.. Y me tiene un poco intrigada xD. Y este es el mejor foro sobre idiomas que he encontrado, así que alguien podría darme información sobre esta frase? Gracias





    Now.. for the english people

    First, sorry for my english, it isn't very good, but I can explain.. I hope..

    Lately I have been searching information about some latin proverbs.. And I found 'Dum Spiro, Spero', 'While I breathe, I hope'
    I am very curious, and I think I really like this proverb and obviously I've been searching information about this phrase, about the writer, the context, and why this phrase was written.
    Unfortunately I couldn't find nothing interesting about the 'history' of that phrase, and I am very intrigued.. So.. This is the best forum about lenguages I could find.. Does anyone can tell me some things about this proverb?


    Thanksssssssssssssss!

    << Moderator's note: This thread has been merged with an earlier thread. >>
    Last edited by Cagey; 30th August 2012 at 12:38 AM. Reason: < Merge threads. >

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Native language
    English-American
    Posts
    2

    Re: Information about 'Dum Spiro, Spero' :)

    It's the motto of the state of South Carolina, as well as making a few other appearances in media. It is generally taken to mean "While I hope, I breathe" and its first recorded user is Cicero, though its origin is a matter of some debate. Hope this helped.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Native language
    English - UK
    Posts
    2,013

    Re: Information about 'Dum Spiro, Spero' :)

    saluete!

    Cic. ad Att. 9.10.3 has "dum anima est, spes esse dicitur" - literally, "it is said that, while there is breath, there is hope". There is also something similar in a fragment of the Elder Cato, and Seneca, Ep. 70.6 quotes an orator as saying "omnia homini, dum vivit, speranda sunt".

    With all respect to facemonsterz (#2), "dum spiro, spero" means "While I breathe, I hope", so it's tantamount to the English idiom, "While there's life, there's hope".

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Native language
    English-American
    Posts
    2

    Re: Information about 'Dum Spiro, Spero' :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Scholiast View Post
    saluete!

    Cic. ad Att. 9.10.3 has "dum anima est, spes esse dicitur" - literally, "it is said that, while there is breath, there is hope". There is also something similar in a fragment of the Elder Cato, and Seneca, Ep. 70.6 quotes an orator as saying "omnia homini, dum vivit, speranda sunt".

    With all respect to facemonsterz (#2), "dum spiro, spero" means "While I breathe, I hope", so it's tantamount to the English idiom, "While there's life, there's hope".
    sorry, I just got the two mixed up in my head. Ill make sure to proofread in the future :P

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Native language
    Spanish
    Posts
    6

    Re: Information about 'Dum Spiro, Spero' :)

    Quote Originally Posted by Scholiast View Post
    saluete!

    Cic. ad Att. 9.10.3 has "dum anima est, spes esse dicitur" - literally, "it is said that, while there is breath, there is hope". There is also something similar in a fragment of the Elder Cato, and Seneca, Ep. 70.6 quotes an orator as saying "omnia homini, dum vivit, speranda sunt".

    With all respect to facemonsterz (#2), "dum spiro, spero" means "While I breathe, I hope", so it's tantamount to the English idiom, "While there's life, there's hope".
    Thanks everybody!

    My last question, I think.. xD

    What does ''omnia homini, dum vivit, speranda sunt'' means in English?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Native language
    English - UK
    Posts
    2,013

    Re: Information about 'Dum Spiro, Spero' :)

    salue iterum!

    What does ''omnia homini, dum vivit, speranda sunt'' means in English?
    "While [or "so long as"] he lives, there is every hope for a human being".

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Native language
    english
    Posts
    2

    Re: Dum Spiro Spero

    While I breathe I hope

  12. #32
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Native language
    French (France)
    Posts
    3,243

    Re: Dum Spiro Spero

    Sorry to pour cold water on all the "information" on the internet, but what Cicero actually said (ad Atticum 9,10,3) is: ut aegroto, dum anima est, spes esse dicitur, sic ego, quoad Pompeius in Italia fuit, sperare non destiti. “As in the case of a sick man one says, ‘While there is breath there is hope,’ so, as long as Pompey was in Italy, I did not cease to hope.”

    In direct speech this would be “dum anima est, spes est” not “dum spiro spero”. And Cicero is clearly citing it as a pre-existing adage, not as something new.
    Last edited by fdb; 28th August 2012 at 4:46 PM.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Native language
    english
    Posts
    2

    Re: Dum Spiro Spero

    Then could u explain why the Scottish clan maclennan use it as their motto

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Native language
    French (France)
    Posts
    3,243

    Re: Dum Spiro Spero

    It has been around for a long time, but it is not in Cicero, and apparently not in Ovid either.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Milan
    Native language
    Italian
    Posts
    27

    Re: Latin: Dum Spiro Spero

    Quote Originally Posted by Outsider View Post
    It's not a literal translation, but it certainly is the best one.
    dum = until

    Until I breath (I live), there is hope. (don't give up).

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    France
    Native language
    AmE
    Age
    39
    Posts
    5,588

    Re: Latin: Dum Spiro Spero

    Quote Originally Posted by stevelogan View Post
    Until I breath (I live), there is hope. (don't give up).
    Dum can mean "until", but not here. Your translation makes no sense. The other translations proposed above are far better.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •