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Thread: Dinky

  1. #21
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    Re: Dinky

    "Dinky" is used in the Disney movie Who Framed Roger Rabbit as a euphemism for "penis." (Well, Touchstone, technically, but that was just a Disney brand name.)

    Baby Herman: I got a fifty-year-old lust and a three-year-old dinky.

    So it's not exactly an obscure usage.

  2. #22
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    Re: Dinky

    Quote Originally Posted by AngelEyes View Post
    Dink is another word for penis.
    Quote Originally Posted by AngelEyes View Post
    Trisia,

    I'm sorry! I know I'm no expert on those things, but I don't think it's just me here in Michigan.

    1. HERE
    2. HERE
    3. HERE
    4. HERE

    I would never use dink or dinky in reference to a male friend. Keep in mind this word is a softer version of dick.
    Another Michigander who used that term, back in the '60s. Don't think I ever heard "dick" until after I moved to Illinois, when I was 12.

  3. #23
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    Re: Dinky

    Mental Note: "Stop describing absolutely everything as dinky if you ever visit USA. Especially Michigan."
    Edit yourself ~ its less embarassing than someone else doing it for you,

  4. #24
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    Re: Dinky

    Except for Roger Rabbit, I've never heard "dink" or "dinky" used as a euphemism for "penis." "Dinky" has always had negative connotations (meaning "small" but in a cheap, shabby or otherwise inadequate way, not a cute way), but not negative in that way. Live and learn!
    Last edited by JustKate; 8th January 2013 at 11:54 PM.
    "If you take hyphens seriously, you will surely go mad" - Oxford University Press style manual

  5. #25
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    Re: Dinky

    Same for me, JustKate. I've never heard "dink" to mean "penis".

  6. #26
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    Re: Dinky

    My gosh, from the time I was a young girl, we called those things dinks. I'm amazed at the regional differences in the understanding of this word.

    Well, learning is why I'm here.
    Last edited by AngelEyes; 9th January 2013 at 7:38 PM.

  7. #27
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    Re: Dinky

    I think I heard Rush Limbaugh refer to Senator Lindsey Graham (S.C.) as 'Dinky' Graham on his show. I knew it must mean something bad, because the senator is a moderate Republican whom Rush dislikes.

  8. #28
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    Re: Dinky

    Quote Originally Posted by jiamajia View Post
    I think I heard Rush Limbaugh refer to Senator Lindsey Graham (S.C.) as 'Dinky' Graham on his show. I knew it must mean something bad, because the senator is a moderate Republican whom Rush dislikes.
    Probably I remembered it wrong. It could be 'Dingy Graham'.

  9. #29
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    Re: Dinky

    Probably worth a mention: there used to be a very popular British brand of model cars, lorries, aeroplanes, etc called "Dinky". Examples are still very much collected http://www.dinkysite.com/#/rare-dinky/4515774699

    To people of my age who had them when young, "dinky" conjures up something small and smart.
    "There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn't."

  10. #30
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    Re: Dinky

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulQ View Post
    Probably worth a mention: there used to be a very popular British brand of model cars, lorries, aeroplanes, etc called "Dinky". Examples are still very much collected http://www.dinkysite.com/#/rare-dinky/4515774699

    To people of my age who had them when young, "dinky" conjures up something small and smart.
    (See post #5 )
    Your meaning is not what you think it is, it is what your listener thinks it is

  11. #31
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    Re: Dinky

    I wonder if he has any swaps?
    "There are no rules in English, only guidance. Some guidance looks like a rule; it probably isn't."

  12. #32
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    Re: Dinky

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulQ View Post
    Probably worth a mention: there used to be a very popular British brand of model cars, lorries, aeroplanes, etc called "Dinky". Examples are still very much collected http://www.dinkysite.com/#/rare-dinky/4515774699
    See also here:
    Dinky/Matchbox toy

    Edit yourself ~ its less embarassing than someone else doing it for you,

  13. #33
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    Re: Dinky

    Quote Originally Posted by jiamajia View Post
    I think I heard Rush Limbaugh refer to Senator Lindsey Graham (S.C.) as 'Dinky' Graham on his show. I knew it must mean something bad, because the senator is a moderate Republican whom Rush dislikes.
    Although he may have, I've never heard Rush use the word dinky for Lindsey Graham. He has used the word dingy in reference to Harry Reid. Two totally different meanings here.

  14. #34
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    Jan 2013
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    Re: Dinky

    To me, "dinky" means small in cute way, or somewhat humorously small. It's only slightly derogatory. "Rinky-dink" means shoddy or small-time, built or performed to low standards. Example: "a rinky-dink operation", to describe such an endeavor. I'm from Virginia.

    The descriptions from Michigan suggest some later evolutions, and even sound like the Michigan accent, with "dink" for "think," etc. In German, "ding" means "thing," and as I read recently, "no more beautiful a word in German than it is in English." (In www*nybooks*com/articles/archives/2013/jan/10/study-panther/ footnote 6, John Banville quoting Mark Harman. I can't post links, new user.)

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