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Thread: What do you call your currency informally?

  1. #1
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    What do you call your currency informally?

    In the US a dollar is also called a buck.
    UK=quid
    China=quay or kwai

    Do all countries have nicknames for their currencies, and if there is a nickname how did the nickname get started?

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    In Spain money is "pasta".
    We haven't yet a nick for the euro. At least I haven't heard of it.
    In order to form an immaculate member of a flock of sheep one must, above all, be a sheep. I am a platypus.

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    In the U.S. we often say "bucks" or if one is feeling particularly silly and old-fashioned, "smackaroos". If we're talking in the thousands, people will say "grand" or "G's".

    I heard U.S. dollars referred to as "divisa" when I was in Cuba. The merchants didn't want Cuban currency and would always ask if we had "divisa" instead.

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    Quote Originally Posted by PocketCathy View Post
    I heard U.S. dollars referred to as "divisa" when I was in Cuba. The merchants didn't want Cuban currency and would always ask if we had "divisa" instead.
    Is divisa derived from a spanish word or has a Visa charge card become synonymous with the dollar, I wonder?

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    Quote Originally Posted by tinlizzy View Post
    Is divisa derived from a spanish word or has a Visa charge card become synonymous with the dollar, I wonder?
    No. "divisa" is a Spanish word for any country currency
    divisa:
    4.
    f. Moneda extranjera referida a la unidad del país de que se trata. U. m. en pl.
    Source.
    En el Perú el castellano es el idioma de uso común, y el quechua es una importante herencia de nuestro pasado inca.

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    Here in Veneto (north east) I often use "schei" (money) it's dialect.

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    In Russia, the national currency has a bunch of nicknames, the most popular being бабки (babki; the word is oddly similar to the one meaning old women, but I don't know if there's a close connection).

    And we, too, call dollars 'bucks'. Interestingly, in Russian the word has acquired second plural ending - this must sound pretty funny to Russian-speaking Americans, I guess.
    Anna

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    Since the euro is relatively new, nobody has devised a nickname for it yet. We used to call our former currency, the pesseta (literally "little piece") "pela" or "peles" in plural, which means "peel".

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    Quote Originally Posted by ernest_ View Post
    Since the euro is relatively new, nobody has devised a nickname for it yet. We used to call our former currency, the pesseta (literally "little piece") "pela" or "peles" in plural, which means "peel".
    Hi,

    In Madrid we have adopted the old expression for 5 pessetas "pavo" (also called "duro) to call euros.

    Cheers.

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    we usually call it ''bani''. It has various nicknames anyway. Some call it ''bănet'',others ''gologani'' .

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    Quote Originally Posted by Antpax View Post
    In Madrid we have adopted the old expression for 5 pessetas "pavo" (also called "duro) to call euros.
    Interesting. We don't use "pavo" round here. In fact, I've only heard this word in American movies dubbed into Spanish. It sounds very American to me. It was always "peles" and "duros" here.

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    Re: All languages: What do you call your currency informally?

    In Turkish we say:
    "kağıt" (originally means: paper)
    "kafa" (originally means: head)
    and also: "mangır", "papel"

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    Re: All languages: What do you call your currency informally?

    In the UK, as well as being called a quid, the pound is also a nicker.

    1,000 pounds = a grand or "bag of sand" (London Cockney rhyming slang).

    Loose change of low value is sometimes referred to as shrapnel.

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    Re: All languages: What do you call your currency informally?

    In Argentina (well, at least in Buenos Aires) we call the national currency (pesos) "guita". Guita also used to mean cents, but this usage is now only used by the older people.

    In addition fixed amounts of money have their own names:
    $100 = "una gamba"
    $1,000 = "una luca" (2000 dos lucas, 3000 tres lucas, etc)
    $1,000,000 = "un palo" (for 2M, 3M, etc it's same as the previous)

    Regarding this, it's worth mention that when we talk about US dollars, U$S 1,000 and U$S 1,000,000 are often called "una luca verde" and "un palo verde" respectively ('a green "luca"' and 'a green "palo"')
    Last edited by mgwls; 19th August 2007 at 7:38 PM.
    (Please correct my mistakes. Thank you!)

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    Quote Originally Posted by Horazio View Post
    Here in Veneto (north east) I often use "schei" (money) it's dialect.
    Here in Trentino we use "schei" as well

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    Re: What do you call your currency informally?

    Quote Originally Posted by Etcetera View Post
    And we, too, call dollars 'bucks'. Interestingly, in Russian the word has acquired second plural ending - this must sound pretty funny to Russian-speaking Americans, I guess.
    We says bucks, plural, also.
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    Re: All languages: What do you call your currency informally?

    Hi:

    In Peru we call to the money "plata": Do you have money? "¿tienes plata?
    and this is our "Peruvian money glossary"

    In Mexico they call it "feria", Do you have money? ¿tienes feria?
    En el Perú el castellano es el idioma de uso común, y el quechua es una importante herencia de nuestro pasado inca.

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    Re: All languages: What do you call your currency informally?

    In Finland some people call the euro ege. A colloquial example sentence might go something like: "Mullon viis egee" = I've got five euros. There are a lot more nicknames for the euro, and you can probably coin one yourself if you like. It just has to resemble the original word, if by nothing more than by the first letter being E. You'll be understood from the context.

    The previous currency (Finnish Mark) is sometimes being referred to as mummonmarkka or mummo, meaning granny's Mark or granny respectively. I guess the name comes from the fact that a part of the elderly, being used to the Mark, still convert the prices to understand the value of a product, for example.


  19. #19
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    Re: All languages: What do you call your currency informally?

    Quote Originally Posted by tinlizzy View Post
    In the US a dollar is also called a buck.
    UK=quid
    China=quay or kwai

    Do all countries have nicknames for their currencies, and if there is a nickname how did the nickname get started?
    We use to write it kuai in PinYin, the official phonetic writing system in China ;-), but it sounds the same as yours

    In france we had so many names for the Franc, i am sad we don"t have nicknames for euro yet !

    A franc was said balles, only plural "T'as pas 100 balles?"
    And we had a lot of names for 10 000 francs (1 500 €) : brique (brick), patate (potato) ...

  20. #20
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    Re: All languages: What do you call your currency informally?

    We have a similar situation in France with the euro. As incassable was saying we had slang words for the francs but people haven't come up with slang words for the euro. Words that were used for francs don't (yet?) apply to the euros. That's also due to the fact that people up to the age of about 25 still use francs regularly when talking about large sums of money (house, car prices etc...) and therefore need to distinguish clearly when they are talking in francs or euros.

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