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Thread: Milano da bere

  1. #1
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    Milano da bere

    Hi all

    I'm translating into English a tourist guide.
    Describing Milan it mentions the famous expression "Milano da bere" (the sentence sounds like "Potete piacevolmente bighellonare nella Milano da bere...")

    The meaning is clear - it's an expression that has become idiomatic since the last 20 years, after a famous advertising campaign of a Milanese aperitive. It refers to all the pubs, bars, restaurants, etc etc that wake up at sunset and close at dawn, and that give us Milanese people such a variety of interesting ways to hang around for hours from 6 p.m. on...

    But is there a decent way to translate that??? Thank you!!
    Last edited by Paulfromitaly; 4th October 2007 at 3:08 PM.
    Mich

  2. #2
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Ho trovato Milano da bere (Milano to Drink) su questa guida turistica.

    Milano is the throbbing heart of Lombardia, the capital of fashion, business and culture but also of the "Milano da bere" (Milano to Drink) as well as the ...

    http://www.bravofly.com/content/en/t...vel-guide.html

  3. #3
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Milan night-life ?
    Youth would be ideal if it came a little later in life.

  4. #4
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Baldpate, temo così sfugga la dimensione del bere (nello specifico, dell' aperitivo – evento che non necessariamente si associa al night-life).

    Suppongo che il termine sia talmente specifico, da rendere qualsivoglia traduzione riduttiva. Infondo, come tradurre aperitivo (l' evento)?

  5. #5
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    Re: Milano da bere

    I think it's untranslatable. "Milan to drink" is meaningless; the poor translator was evidently in difficulty like the rest of us! If you think back, also in Italian "Milano da bere" was meaningless until it was coined for the commercial.
    What about "Milan's evening and night life"? I'm not 100% convinced, but that would include the aperitif.

  6. #6
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    Re: Milano da bere

    I suggest "Drink in Milan" with drink in the imperative sense. Obviously you would be drinking in Milan...

  7. #7
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Ciao,
    un'altra possibilita', secondo me potrebbe essere "where, what to drink in Milan". Essendo una guida ci sara' senz'altro una lista dei posti dove andare e alcune delle loro specialita'!

  8. #8
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    Re: Milano da bere

    E qulacosa tipo
    "Drinkin' Milan"?
    E' un mix tra "bevendo Milano" e "bere a Milano"...

  9. #9
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    Re: Milano da bere

    My best stab(s): the Milan aperitif scene, Milan's aperitif bar circuit, Milan's famous all-night bars, Milan's famous drinking and socializing scene .. or some such.
    (hic!)

  10. #10
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    Re: Milano da bere

    I'm afraid it's really difficult to find an expression that conveys the meaning of (or behind) Milano da bere. I mean, it's hard to understand what Milano da bere means unless you know some context (Milan, the 80's, etc....).

  11. #11
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Reading this old thread I was surprised to see that none of my fellow native speakers pointed out that this expression, though originated as a slogan for a commercial, is by now definitely used in a derogatory fashion and has become a byword for a milieu where, under the sleek, glittering surface of fashion designers, hot spots and new money, a world of unprincipled young go-getters, unscrupulous businessmen and corrupt politicians was paving the way to that phenomenon that would eventually become known as “Tangentopoli”.

    Wiki tells the story (only in Italian, I'm sorry).
    Poderoso caballero es Don Dinero

  12. #12
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Quote Originally Posted by King Crimson View Post
    Reading this old thread I was surprised to see that none of my fellow native speakers pointed out that this expression, though originated as a slogan for a commercial, is by now definitely used in a derogatory fashion and has become a byword for a milieu where, under the sleek, glittering surface of fashion designers, hot spots and new money, a world of unprincipled young go-getters, unscrupulous businessmen and corrupt politicians was paving the way to that phenomenon that would eventually become known as “Tangentopoli”.
    It must be something to do with age, KC, as that's certainly what I associate Milan in the 80s (la Milano da bere*) with.
    Whether or not it's translateable is quite another matter (I would say it isn't). This might be one of those cases in which it's better to leave the expression in the original language and write a footnote explaining it.

    * Were you thinking about anyone in particular when you mentioned unscrupulous businessmen and corrupt politicians ? No, don't answer that, you'll get done for slander and libel.

  13. #13
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Quote Originally Posted by london calling View Post
    It must be something to do with age, KC, as that's certainly what I associate Milan in the 80s (la Milano da bere*) with.
    Whether or not it's translateable is quite another matter (I would say it isn't). This might be one of those cases in which it's better to leave the expression in the original language and write a footnote explaining it.

    * Were you thinking about anyone in particular when you mentioned unscrupulous businessmen and corrupt politicians ? No, don't answer that, you'll get done for slander and libel. Well, the photograph in the Wiki link I posted says it all (and now you may sue Wiki, if you wish...)
    Poderoso caballero es Don Dinero

  14. #14
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Sue Wiki, KC? They should get a bloody medal!

    I hadn't read the Wiki article when I replied to you, by the way.

    KIta, come pensi di fare?

  15. #15
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    Re: Milano da bere

    I have to translate exactly the same idiom... Do you think swinging Milan can be used? Maybe it doesn't convey the derogatory meaning it has now, but it can give an idea of the atmosphere then. Or maybe go-getters' Milan...

    Any suggestions? Thanks a lot!

  16. #16
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Please explain the context of your translation - where is the phrase used etc.

    Cosa significa "aggiungere il contesto"?

  17. #17
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Sorry I thought the meaning was clear from the thread above. However it an article about a bar where non-yuppies used to hang out "prima che fosse frequentato dagli squali della Milano da bere"

    Thanks

  18. #18
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    Re: Milano da bere

    The meaning of the phrase is clear, however, from the rest of the thread, it's also clear that this is difficult to translate in English, hence we need the context in order to be able to paraphrase. Maybe you could translate it with "Milan's yuppies and political sharks", but wait for some more ideas

  19. #19
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Just came across this discussion. I'd be tempted to translate it with "cocktail-crowd Milan"...

    (The original expression is culturally charged: it can assume many meanings and evoke different feelings in each reader. Leaving it untranslated, as LC suggested last year, would require a hell of a footnote. I'd rather offer a partial translation than risk getting bogged down in a mini-treatise on Milan in the 80s )
    Je suis Charlie."

  20. #20
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    Re: Milano da bere

    Thanks Tegs and Teerex for the interesting insights! I'll think about it. Considering it's a lighthearted lifestyle article I want to avoid foot-notes, or any lengthy explanation. I just need something that sounds "cool".

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