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Thread: remare contro

  1. #21
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.


  2. #22
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    Re: chi rema contro

    I can see what you mean, but I think if you said row against the stream/swimming against the tide you'd get the idea across. However, I must say I'd translate it as you suggest, it sounds a whole lot better:

    Bersani: Renzi isn't toeing the line (or is he...).
    Last edited by london calling; 27th March 2013 at 2:36 PM.

  3. #23
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    Re: chi rema contro

    I think that "rowing against" should have a meaning like "superare delle difficoltà contro"... so you should definitely keep it out
    Maybe, if you want to use an idiom, "To throw a spanner in the works" or something like that?
    Or you could use a simple verbal forms like giving troubles, straiten, causing problems...

  4. #24
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    Re: chi rema contro

    I can't think of anything with the "rowing" theme - but I just saw a headline in today's paper here that expresses somewhat the same idea:

    .....breaks with the pack

    also seen as: break from the pack

    However, I do see a slight difference in meaning. "Rowing against the tide" sounds more positive. If Bersani said, "Renzi is rowing against us..." it would have a negative connotation (from his point of view, of course.)

    Breaking from the pack can also be seen as a positive move (by someone outside the pack)

  5. #25
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by gettingby View Post
    I can think of the OPPOSITE idiom- not towing the line.
    For the record, the idiom goes "to toe the line" , the verb being to toe, not to tow .
    Je suis Charlie."

  6. #26
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by Teerex51 View Post
    For the record, the idiom goes "to toe the line" , the verb being to toe, not to tow .
    Stupid woman, of course it is! Will correct, now.

  7. #27
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by Ceccis View Post
    I think that "rowing against" should have a meaning like "superare delle difficoltà contro"... so you should definitely keep it out
    Maybe, if you want to use an idiom, "To throw a spanner in the works" or something like that?
    Your suggestion is not half bad. I like "to put spokes in (somebody's) wheel(s)".
    "I'm sorry, I'm a stranger here to myself" -- Anon.

  8. #28
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    Re: chi rema contro

    For lack of a better idiom, I'd go with: Renzi's dragging his feet or won't play along. ​Not quite the same as "remare contro" but pretty close, in my opinion.
    Je suis Charlie."

  9. #29
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    Re: chi rema contro

    All very good! How about "to go against the grain?"

  10. #30
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by gettingby View Post
    How about "to go against the grain?"
    No, that means something else.
    "I'm sorry, I'm a stranger here to myself" -- Anon.

  11. #31
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by gettingby View Post
    All very good! How about "to go against the grain?"
    I think that'd work.
    This idiom has, in my opinion, two slightly different meanings: (a) to go against the wishes of others/the trend, and (b) to be contrary to one's disposition.
    Je suis Charlie."

  12. #32
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by Teerex51 View Post
    This idiom has, in my opinion, two slightly different meanings: (a) to go against the wishes of others/the trend, and (b) to be contrary to one's disposition.
    Really? You surprise me! Can you find/invent a context to illustrate sense b)? It's completely new to me...
    "I'm sorry, I'm a stranger here to myself" -- Anon.

  13. #33
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Hi Gavin, I'll try...


    • Having to reprimand co-workers truly goes against my grain
    • To blab on for hours on the cellphone goes against my grain
    • It went against her grain to refuse helping someone
    Je suis Charlie."

  14. #34
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by GavinW View Post
    Really? You surprise me! Can you find/invent a context to illustrate sense b)? It's completely new to me...
    Personally, I have only ever used it with sense (b). Most of the times I have seen it used with sense (a), the speaker was American.
    It's the short words that get you.

  15. #35
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    Re: chi rema contro

    I can see used it both ways. However, I am not at all familiar with "against my/her grain" - in BE, it's usually "to go against the grain". Maybe Teerex's version is AmE usage?

  16. #36
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Hang on, we're talking at cross purposes (at least me and TR are! Anche se sono grato a TR per la disponibilità). I took TR's post to mean that he confirmed that the Italian idiom in question (remare contro) can be translated by "to go against the grain" (as proposed by gb in post 10, a suggestion which I disputed). There is of course no doubt over the meaning or existence of the English idiom. However, I continue to object that it can never be used to translate "remare contro" (or indeed, vice versa). Tutto qua!

    EDIT: So my request for example contexts meant I was interested in seeing usages of "remare contro" which illustrate situations that correspond to the meaning of "to go against the grain".
    "I'm sorry, I'm a stranger here to myself" -- Anon.

  17. #37
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by GavinW View Post
    However, I continue to object that it can never be used to translate "remare contro" (or indeed, vice versa). Tutto qua!
    I'm in agreement with that, Gavin. To me, "to go against the grain" has a different nuance - one of going against a generally accepted trend, not of not towing a specific line.

  18. #38
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by GavinW View Post
    EDIT: So my request for example contexts meant I was interested in seeing usages of "remare contro" which illustrate situations that correspond to the meaning of "to go against the grain".
    Just realized Gavin had been asking for examples...(the best ones use the verb to work)

    He's a mainstream visionary, working against the grain. [in performing arts]
    Working against the grain isn’t something new for Sxxx [crossing party lines]
    They are working against the grain of government policy [at odds with public policy]

    In the final analysis, the Italian idiom means "azione o atteggiamento di contrasto, di opposizione all’indirizzo seguito (o alle decisioni prese) dalla maggioranza o dagli altri componenti di un gruppo, di un partito"

    Quote Originally Posted by elfa
    To me, "to go against the grain" has a different nuance - one of going against a generally accepted trend, not of not towing a specific line.

    I guess you didn't read the memo whole thread. This particular line is toed, not towed.
    Je suis Charlie."

  19. #39
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Thanks again for your efforts, TR. But, alas, we're still not understanding each other.
    I was calling for example sentences in Italian of the Italian idiom "remare contro". (Subsequently, from this raw material, it should then be easier to confirm, or reject, the possibility of using the English idiom "go against the grain" [or indeed any other expression using "grain"] as a translation for any of the given Italian example sentences). In other words, you've missed my point about directionality. ;-)
    "I'm sorry, I'm a stranger here to myself" -- Anon.

  20. #40
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    Re: chi rema contro

    Quote Originally Posted by GavinW View Post
    In other words, you've missed my point about directionality. ;-)
    Mmmhh, it was so subtle I must have read right past it...

    No problemo.

    Smettila di remare contro, siamo tutti nella stessa situazione.
    Qui in azienda c'è sempre qualcuno che rema contro.
    Quelli che remano contro sono avvertiti!
    Je suis Charlie."

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