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Thread: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

  1. #501
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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by Biffo View Post
    A child who had heard the phrase "Go and have a good think about what you just did." prior to hearing the phrase "...another think coming." would easily assimilate the new expression.
    Quote Originally Posted by timpeac View Post
    I think what you're missing is that the fact "thing coming" and "think coming" sound the same in normal speed speech (whichever is more assimilated towards the other) means that both have the same chance as being interpreted as the other.
    Providing a child is familiar with 'think' (n), how often could we expect he actually use it compared to 'thing'? For example, could we speculate that if the child is, say, seven, he would use it once for every thousand times he uses 'thing' (in thought, speech or writing)? If so, is it fair to say that, when the child hears the phrase under discussion for the first time, 'think' and 'thing' both have the same chance to be interpreted as the other?
    Quote Originally Posted by JulianStuart View Post
    However, I have not seen any cogent explanation of how "another" was accepted instead of the "some" that seems more logical to me as the prefix for this "thing".
    This, to me, is but another support for that the 'thing' version derived from the supposedly more logical 'think' version. (To this thingist, the thinkists present the most coherent reasons for why their version would be the original one.)
    Last edited by EStjarn; 25th November 2012 at 1:15 PM.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by EStjarn View Post
    Providing a child is familiar with 'think' (n), how often could we expect he actually use it compared to 'thing'? For example, could we speculate that if the child is, say, seven, he would use it once for every thousand times he uses 'thing' (in thought, speech or writing)? If so, is it fair to say that, when the child hears the phrase under discussion for the first time, 'think' and 'thing' both have the same chance to be interpreted as the other?
    I'm not sure how much the frequency of usage of a given word will contribute towards it being more likely to be heard. My point there was that phonologically there is no reason for one to supplant the other. I would also note that even if "thing" as a noun is more common than "think" as a noun, in the particular phrase we are discussing the word has just been used, albeit as a verb, so that might perhaps contribute towards it being heard.
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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by JulianStuart View Post
    I remain a staunch thinkist*, although several pages back I began to understand that the thing the thingists were describing was not a single thought or even session of thoughts (aka a "think") but rather the consequence of the current way of thinking. However, I have not seen any cogent explanation of how "another" was accepted instead of the "some" that seems more logical to me as the prefix for this "thing". (I appreciate that not all people rely on logic as much as this INTJ)
    It is quite simply another thing meaning a different thing, not an additional thing after some prior thing. Think of is as something like karma. What goes around comes around and when it does it may turn out to be something other than what you expect. No joke, no play on words.
    *The printed book data and the logic add to the fact that I first heard the think version (and recall thinking it sounded American, to an English child with a fascination for words!). I have no problem with the similar sounds as the explanation for the change and the impact a first hearing provides on the memory and patterns laid down by the brain. For the longest time, my favourite misapprehension was Jimi Hendrix's "Excuse me while I kiss this guy" (Well, it was the late '60s )
    In my part of the world, think coming and thing coming do not sound the same. I have already mentioned when I first heard think coming and all of us heard exactly that, even though it was not the version we thought was "normal". I thought the speaker was being creative, but others thought she was making an error. This was in the early 1970s.
    Last edited by Forero; 27th November 2012 at 5:18 AM.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Just for the record, I vividly remember coming across "you've got another think coming" when reading some British piece of writing, during writing classes at my Uni.
    This is just to say.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    For the record, I just read on facebook someone write "this kid is somethink amazing" about a certain video. Not sure how many conclusions we can draw from that, but it does show that instinctive confusion between thing and think is wider than with the phrase under discussion. I say instinctive because I'm sure that this is the type of typo/quick error and if he'd reread what he'd written he would have spotted it. Or in fact - based on this thread - perhaps there are going to be lots of supporters to say that is actually the correct phrase.
    ‘If a chap can’t compose an epic poem while he is weaving a tapestry, he had better shut up.' William Morris.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by timpeac View Post
    For the record, I just read on facebook someone write "this kid is somethink amazing" about a certain video. Not sure how many conclusions we can draw from that, but it does show that instinctive confusion between thing and think is wider than with the phrase under discussion. I say instinctive because I'm sure that this is the type of typo/quick error and if he'd reread what he'd written he would have spotted it. Or in fact - based on this thread - perhaps there are going to be lots of supporters to say that is actually the correct phrase.
    I personally wouldn't read too much into that. The only thing that surprises me there is that it didn't say 'somefink', given that (assuming that what I hear on TV is representative of its population as a whole) a huge swathe of southern England now seems to be inhabited by 'fink-ists'.
    However, I do take your point about the potential for confusion.
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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    I was wondering whether any of you 'thinkers' out there take issue with the following expression: 'But that's another thing (entirely)'.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    It is purely a question of usage. Logic has nothing to do with it. But if you think that I agree with you you'll have another think coming.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by Beryl from Northallerton View Post
    I was wondering whether any of you 'thinkers' out there take issue with the following expression: 'But that's another thing (entirely)'.
    Not at all. I use it quite happily, as the 'thing' in that expression simply means another 'issue' or 'matter'. At least, that's how I have always used it.
    Cauliflower is nothing but cabbage with a college education (Mark Twain). I wonder, what is broccoli?

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by Forero View Post
    It is quite simply another thing meaning a different thing, not an additional thing after some prior thing. Think of is as something like karma. What goes around comes around and when it does it may turn out to be something other than what you expect. No joke, no play on words.
    I still don't get what the first thing is - unless there are lots of things that have happened to you and another will soon. Then the "You've got another one coming" doesn't add anything new to the prediction of the future that is influenced by the way the person thinks. We always have things coming in life whether we think X or not. So we always have another thing coming, whether we think X or not. The word "another" requires something to be "other" than.
    "If you think X, then something will be coming your way as a result" - this is another way of saying what the
    "thingists" mean, unless I'm mistaken (has been known). My problem with the thing explanation is not that it's a thing, but that it's another thing, rather than something or something different or a different thing.
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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by JulianStuart View Post
    I still don't get what the first thing is - unless there are lots of things that have happened to you and another will soon. Then the "You've got another one coming" doesn't add anything new to the prediction of the future that is influenced by the way the person thinks. We always have things coming in life whether we think X or not. So we always have another thing coming, whether we think X or not. The word "another" requires something to be "other" than.
    "If you think X, then something will be coming your way as a result" - this is another way of saying what the
    "thingists" mean, unless I'm mistaken (has been known). My problem with the thing explanation is not that it's a thing, but that it's another thing, rather than something or something different or a different thing.
    What is to come does not presuppose any previous thing's having come. Another in "another thing coming" does not mean "additional" but "different". You seem to be expecting some future that perhaps will never come. Something else is coming your way instead (not in addition), some other thing that I perhaps expect but you apparently don't. You are counting on one of, say, three possibilities coming to pass, but there is in fact another possibility that you have neglected to consider: an inevitable, if unexpected, possibility. It is "another" because you have not allowed for it.

    You may be presuming a world in which you can ... and untold blessings will be laid in your lap, but the real world is sending quite another thing your way. You have it coming.

    This other thing is no more a result of your thinking, imagining, or presuming than the thinkists' "think" is a result of the previous "think".

    But neither is this other thing another edition of your thinking, imagining or presuming. As I see it the two expressions have different underlying literal meanings and are not entirely interchangeable.

    If you use "another think coming", you need to include a previous "think", but in my opinion beginning with "If you think ..." does not preclude using "another thing coming". "Another thing coming" works just as well with "think", "imagine", "presume", "expect", and other verbs.

    "Piece house" and "peace house" sound exactly alike, but "pea souse" is a little different. "Another thing coming" and "another think coming" are also a little different.

    As to the history of these expressions, I would expect "another thing coming" or "something else coming" to have existed as a phrase, with a meaning similiar to what I have described, before the "If you ..., then you have ..." construction came into vogue. Then "another 'think' coming" would have come to be as an intentional pun based on "another thing coming" under the influence of a previous "if you think". After all that, "If you think ..., you have another thing coming" would have developed as a "correction", for use in less informal contexts, to the "think" version. Where else would talk of a "think" coming have come from?

    If this hypothesis is correct, then I would expect to see a reasonable facsimile of "another thing coming" in print before the first occurrence of "another think coming".

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    And have you found such an occurrence?

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    As far as I know, 'you've got another thing coming' is hardly found in other contexts, but usually comes after 'If you think that...'.
    This suggests that it is derived from the saying 'another think coming': that it is an altered version of the other expression.
    Last edited by wandle; 27th November 2012 at 8:14 PM.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesM View Post
    And have you found such an occurrence?
    Not yet. And I am not familiar enough with corpus searches to run a quick search for facsimiles.

    Of course proving there is no such occurrence would be even harder.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Yes, but it seems like at least one example is required to turn the hypothesis into a working theory.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by Forero View Post
    ...Another in "another thing coming" does not mean "additional" but "different"...
    That makes excellent sense except that, if that is the case surely we should find lots of instances of "If you think that you've got a different thing coming"

    Google ngram finds not one single instance.
    Last edited by Biffo; 27th November 2012 at 9:13 PM.
    If you think that, you have another think coming!

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by wandle View Post
    As far as I know, 'you've got another thing coming' is hardly found in other contexts, but usually comes after 'If you think that...'.
    This suggests that it is derived from the saying 'another think coming': that it is an altered version of the other expression.
    "You've got another thing coming" does usually come after "If you think that," but it's not hard to find exceptions. Here are some examples that a quick-and-dirty Google search turned up (in addition to many discussions about thing vs. think):
    "If you have any illusions that the entertainment business is anything more or less than that, you've got another thing coming."
    "If you don't believe that Xxxxxx learned from that, you've got another thing coming."
    "Any health junkie will tell you that you've got another thing coming if you assume that this is just another health drink."
    "So-and-so has another thing coming" (several different versions of this).

    Which isn't to say that I don't agree that "another thing coming" probably was derived from "another think coming," because I do agree. But
    I do suggest that whatever its origin, it has diverged somewhat from them.
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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by Forero View Post
    What is to come does not presuppose any previous thing's having come. Another in "another thing coming" does not mean "additional" but "different".
    “If you enjoyed that apple, have a different one.” – Unlikely; “If you enjoyed that apple, have a further one.” Probable.
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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by JustKate View Post
    "You've got another thing coming" does usually come after "If you think that," but it's not hard to find exceptions. Here are some examples that a quick-and-dirty Google search turned up (in addition to many discussions about thing vs. think):
    "If you have any illusions that the entertainment business is anything more or less than that, you've got another thing coming."
    "If you don't believe that Xxxxxx learned from that, you've got another thing coming."
    "Any health junkie will tell you that you've got another thing coming if you assume that this is just another health drink."
    "So-and-so has another thing coming" (several different versions of this).

    Which isn't to say that I don't agree that "another thing coming" probably was derived from "another think coming," because I do agree. But
    I do suggest that whatever its origin, it has diverged somewhat from them.
    Three out of four fall into the same category for me as "think". They are "have illusions", "don't believe that", "you assume that". So would phrases like "under the impression that", "have any designs that", "have the gall to expect that" and many others. The fourth one seems genuinely different. I wouldn't say "Jeff has another think coming" out of the blue with no other context. That fourth one relates back to someone's earlier comment about the broader nature of "another thing coming", to my way of thinking.

    I don't think this thread will ever come to a resolution. Then again, I may have another think coming.

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    Re: You've got another 'thing' / 'think' coming?

    Quote Originally Posted by JamesM View Post
    Three out of four fall into the same category for me as "think". They are "have illusions", "don't believe that", "you assume that". So would phrases like "under the impression that", "have any designs that", "have the gall to expect that" and many others. The fourth one seems genuinely different. I wouldn't say "Jeff has another think coming" out of the blue with no other context. That fourth one relates back to someone's earlier comment about the broader nature of "another thing coming", to my way of thinking.

    I don't think this thread will ever come to a resolution. Then again, I may have another think coming.
    I agree that they "fall into the same category," but my point is that the fact that non-think constructions are relatively easy to find demonstrates that the expression has, for some, moved quite a distance away from the original joke. What makes the original funny or colorful or whatever is the juxtaposition of think that/another think, right? Well, in these examples think isn't used at all. Even if you used think in the second phrase, the joke (such as it is) is gone. Can you imagine anyone saying, "If you believe that, you have another think coming"? I can't.
    Last edited by JustKate; 27th November 2012 at 10:59 PM.
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