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Thread: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

  1. #181
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by texpert View Post
    I very much doubt that 95% of Bulgarians can even tell SK from CZ upon hearing (or seeing) it. The remaining 5% would either be linguists or various professionals that are likely to have biased views (according to which tongue they have been exposed to).

    Bulgarians, correct me if I'm wrong :-)
    I'm just saying this because I think that a few Bulgarians had ranked Slovak as being more intelligible than Czech or Polish in this thread. I'm not saying that they would understand it well, just that they would understand it the best out of the Western Slavic languages.
    Last edited by Icetrance; 18th December 2008 at 3:29 AM.

  2. #182
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Got you. In the meantime, I had followed the thread back a while and was quite surprised by the very same fact. I mention that because BG was the only Slavic land I visited that didn't react to the most rudimental sentences I had used in my native tongue. I wonder if Slovaks did any better. The pattern is that Czech people over 30 sort of follow them because of Russian knowledge (though BGs don't seem to understand my Russian either -

  3. #183
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Its true that we can't really tell apart Czech from Slovak, in some cases even Polish. Only way I recognise it is from some specific sounds, but intelligibility goes under 10%. I think whoever was ranking them, just did it randomly or was never exposed to one of them. You should of been ok with Russian though, its he easiest for us.

  4. #184
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Czech grammatical system is one of the most difficult all over the languages written in latin. Still better, I find Czech preferable for foreigners, just because of its intuitiveness and purity. Peerless handling with sharp consonants and limpid vowels, wondrous collocations and sublime discourse, that´s my cup of tea. I can´t help myself, but, in the aggregate, I commend Czech more than my own language. I know, that many other Slovaks feel simple-hearted bent to Czech too.
    Last edited by Mišo; 18th December 2008 at 6:16 PM.

  5. #185
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Icetrance View Post
    I'm just saying this because I think that a few Bulgarians had ranked Slovak as being more intelligible than Czech or Polish in this thread. I'm not saying that they would understand it well, just that they would understand it the best out of the Western Slavic languages.
    I confirm. A few years ago I was on a party where I met a few guys from the Czech republic. I tried to follow their conversation but it was almost impossible to understand. Later on, one of the guys started talking to another one and I reacted immediatelly "I understood! Finally!". Then he told me "That was in Slovak!".

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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    When I first time heard Bulgarian in some TV document about our Tatras, I tried to ascertain, which slavic language it is. For me it sounds something like "Ukrainian Serbian" and that mix embarrassed myself. After another hearing it was quite more comprehensible for me already.

  7. #187
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Mišo View Post
    Czech grammatical system is one of the most difficult all over the languages written in latin. Still better, I find Czech preferable for foreigners, just because of its intuitiveness and purity. Peerless handling with sharp consonants and limpid vowels, wondrous collocations and sublime discourse, that´s my cup of coffee. I can´t help myself, but, in the aggregate, I commend Czech more than my own language. I know, that many other Slovaks feel simple-hearted bent to Czech.
    Hi! Why do you say that Slovak is less "pure" and "intuitive" than Czech? I would have thought that Slovak is more regular grammatically-speaking. Is that what you mean by "pure"?

    However, I find both Czech and Slovak pronunciation difficult. Slovak is just a bit softer than Czech.

    By the way, on this thread, native speakers of South Slavic Languages also Slovak slightly easier to understand than Czech.

    It's all so very interesting, this!
    Last edited by Icetrance; 18th December 2008 at 5:43 PM.

  8. #188
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Icetrance View Post
    Hi! Why do you say that Slovak is less "pure" and "intuitive" than Czech? I would have thought that Slovak is more regular grammatically-speaking. Is that what you mean than pure?

    However, I find both Czech and Slovak pronunciation difficult. Slovak is just a bit softer than Czech.

    By the way, on this thread, native speakers of South Slavic Languages also Slovak slightly easier to understand than Czech.

    It's all so very interesting, this!
    Hi!

    I know, my bent to Czech may seem to bystanders whimsically. Catch on my looking at czecho-slovak correlation, please. I don´t want to get under Slovaks skin, let alone intrude on Czechs.

    You know, from my point of view, it´s not only about pan-slavic intelligibility or higher simplicity at a glance.

    Slovak has stronger assimilation of sonants, Czech resonants sounds more concrete. In this case, Czech sounds quite closer to AmE. Vice versa, Czech has stronger consonant assimilation.

    Czech emphasis is susceptible a bit easier to foreigner and helps him to get into language lightly. Who do not experience this, the one do not know.

    Malevolent Czechs could reduce Slovak, by their many soft consonants and conservative grammar, to frantically literary Czech. Malicious Slovaks could reduce Czech, by their showy accent and lalorrhoea, to kissing trap language.

    Slovak use more palatalization, so Slovak has to sound softer. But I don´t go all the way with this eyeview. As early as in eighteen century Josef Dobrovský http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josef_Dobrovský deemed, that Czech achieved in its evolution softer stage, than coarser Slovak. There had gone onset to finer pronounciation about.

    Slovak preserve more common slavic components. And last but not least, what for us is our slowness, could be for south and east Slavs articulation.

    To be continued..
    Last edited by Mišo; 19th December 2008 at 3:16 PM.

  9. #189
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Mišo View Post
    Czech sounds quite closer to AmE. Specifically Czech emphasis is susceptible a bit easier to foreigner and helps him to develope in language.
    I myself find Czech rather "dry", harsh and guttural sounding, at least compared to AmE. And the stress in Czech easier? Slovak and Czech both have the stress fixed on the first syllable.
    Last edited by Azori; 18th December 2008 at 11:50 PM.

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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by lior neith View Post
    I myself find Czech rather "dry", harsh and guttural sounding, at least compared to AmE. And the stress in Czech easier? Slovak and Czech both have the stress fixed on the first syllable.
    Hello Lior!
    I have meant more specific pronounciation of vowels, especially "e", and a bit also assimilation of consonants. Please, follow my conation.
    If Czech is guttural, then Slovak is nasal.
    If UK and US English have both dynamic stress, are their accent the same?
    Slovak is groovy and modest, while Czech is vibrant and stagy.
    Last edited by Mišo; 19th December 2008 at 2:02 PM.

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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Kanes View Post
    You should of been ok with Russian though, its he easiest for us.
    In fact, you are not. The Russian will help with reading a Bulgarian newspaper or following a spoken conversation, even though the most basic Serbian will do a better job here. Yet to my initial surprise, I found no use of Russian for the two-way communication, simply because I had met no Bulgarian willing to admit he did ever learn it at school. A question like Govorite po russky just messed things up so after several futile attempts I ditched the whole thing and hired myself an interpreter. I'm talking about the older generation from rural areas, needless to say. These folks are also the least disposed to indulge in the Slavic Dances (my makeshift expression for the wild gesturing and immediate adopting of some sort of panslavic vocabulary) from any other Slavic peoples I had ever spoken to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Darina View Post
    Later on, one of the guys started talking to another one and I reacted immediatelly "I understood! Finally!". Then he told me "That was in Slovak!".
    Did the guy say to the other Aká krásná mladá žena! possibly?
    Last edited by texpert; 20th December 2008 at 6:56 AM.

  12. #192
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by texpert View Post
    In fact, you are not. The Russian will help with reading a Bulgarian newspaper or following a spoken conversation, even though the most basic Serbian will do a better job here. Yet to my initial surprise, I found no use of Russian for the two-way communication, simply because I had met no Bulgarian willing to admit he did ever learn it at school. A question like Govorite po russky just messed things up so after several futile attempts I ditched the whole thing and hired myself an interpreter. I'm talking about the older generation from rural areas, needless to say. These folks are also the least disposed to indulge in the Slavic Dances (my makeshift expression for the wild gesturing and immediate adopting of some sort of panslavic vocabulary) from any other Slavic peoples I had ever spoken to.
    People from rural areas don't usually speak or understand foreign languages.

  13. #193
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Same here, except that after govorite po russky there would be a stunned silence and then some version of the above-mentioned Slavic Dance - "malinko" (a little bit) spoken in Czech but with Russian pronunciation, for instance.
    Last edited by texpert; 22nd December 2008 at 6:48 PM.

  14. #194
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    O.K. The only Slavic language I speak is Serbo-Croatian (the Serbian standard). I find that my understanding of various Slavic languages varies according to the type of discourse I am trying to comprehend. For instance, it is much easier for me to understand contextually rich written texts which use 'general' vocabulary (say, a newspaper article) than relatively poorly contextualized texts such as poetry. Also, understanding written texts is always easier for me than understanding speech in other Slavic languages. Within spoken language, TV (especially news) is much easier than regular rapid-fire conversation.

    A caveat: I'm a linguist (but do not specialize in Slavic linguistics), which makes me acutely aware of language form and language variation, so you could say that I am better able to extrapolate from not-completely-transparent linguistic data than your average Joe.

    Anyways, I find that I can read the following Slavic languages (other than Serbo-Croatian) with ease: Macedonian, Slovene, and Bulgarian. If pressed, I can understand a Russian text fairly well. Slovak and Pannonian Rusyn would be next. I find Czech and Polish more difficult, as well as Ukrainian and Belorussian (the two Sorbian languages and Cassubian would be even more difficult, I guess). For this last group, I can only understand the gist of the text without using a dictionary. However, the grammar is always absolutely clear and I can easily identify the grammatical roles and forms of words. This means that I can, in theory, crack a text in any Slavic language if I resort to using a dictionary and if I give myself plenty of time.

    In terms of spoken language, I undertand Macedonian, Bulgarian, and Slovene very well, though, of course, not perfectly. For instance, I often watch Slovene TV on the internet and do not have to focus too hard to understand almost everything. Also, I have spoken to Macedonians and Slovenes in Serbo-Croatian and been spoken to in their respective languages and it worked, though it wasn't always easy. This doesn't usually happen, though, as most Slovenes and Macedonians are able to shift their speech toward SC at least a bit.

    As for Bulgarian, I recall being at a museum in Greece once and stumbling upon a guided tour in Bulgarian (my group had no guide of our own). I joined this group and understood pretty much everything the guide said (though, again, not 100%).

    When flying Czech Airlines between North America and Europe, I always make a point of taking a peek at their magazine (in Czech and English). I find that I can read it if I really focus hard, but it does require a lot of mental gymnastics and guessing (as Jana mentioned above).

    As a comparison, it might be useful to mention that, Spanish being the only Romance language I speak, I am able to read Italian, Catalan, Galician, and Portuguese texts such as newspapers and magazines with ease (I can also read scholarly articles in linguistics in these languages) and without a dictionary. I believe I could manage Occitan almost as well as Catalan. French is a bit tougher, but I can read it too. Romanian, Aromanian, Rhaeto-Romance, Friulian, Neapolitan, Franco-Provencal and other Romance languages are much harder for me. Now here's the thing: given a choice between a Russian or Czech text and one in Italian or Catalan, I would always pick the latter, as it would be much easier for me to read these fluently and without too much guessing.

    When I was in Italy, I found that I could use my Spanish when the locals were unable to communicate in English, though I often had to backtrack and 'modify' my Spanish to sound more Italian (e.g. by using an Italian form if I knew it or could guess at it, modifying my plural markers and verb endings, and, of course, speaking very slowly and deliberately).

    In the Czech Republic, I find that I can get by using Serbo-Croatian in stores (when the person I'm talking to does not speak English), though it's not always a breeze. Once, I remember trying to buy a "sveska" (notebook), but the sales clerk had no idea what I meant. After a lot of miming and pointing, she understood that I wanted a "teka". I thought, "Drat! This is the Croatian word!", but, alas, it hadn't crossed my mind!

    A couple of years ago, in Kladno near Prague, I remember being unable to get a "phone card" from a lady at a local store, but when I asked for a "telefonska kartica", she smiled and gave me one right away. I also could have guessed and said something in fake Czech ("telefonni kartichka?"), but that would have been the solution at the next level of desperation
    Last edited by Transatlantic; 28th December 2008 at 2:44 AM. Reason: Typo

  15. #195
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Transatlantic View Post
    O.K. The only Slavic language I speak is Serbo-Croatian (the Serbian standard). I find that my understanding of various Slavic languages varies according to the type of discourse I am trying to comprehend. For instance, it is much easier for me to understand contextually rich written texts which use 'general' vocabulary (say, a newspaper article) than relatively poorly contextualized texts such as poetry. Also, understanding written texts is always easier for me than understanding speech in other Slavic languages. Within spoken language, TV (especially news) is much easier than regular rapid-fire conversation.

    A caveat: I'm a linguist (but do not specialize in Slavic linguistics), which makes me acutely aware of language form and language variation, so you could say that I am better able to extrapolate from not-completely-transparent linguistic data than your average Joe.

    Thanks for your post.

    I would like to know why you find slovak easier to read than Czech and Polish. Slovak is a Western Slavonic language just like the other two.

    It always seems that Slovak is the most comprehensible Western Slavic language to those who are native speakers of Eastern or Southern Slavic languages. That's very interesting.

    By the way, as a fluent French speaker who doesn't speak any other Romance languages fluently, I find Italian to be the easiest one to understand, particularly the written language. Spanish, Portuguese and Romanian are much more difficult for me.

    Anyways, I find that I can read the following Slavic languages (other than Serbo-Croatian) with ease: Macedonian, Slovene, and Bulgarian. If pressed, I can understand a Russian text fairly well. Slovak and Pannonian Rusyn would be next. I find Czech and Polish more difficult, as well as Ukrainian and Belorussian (the two Sorbian languages and Cassubian would be even more difficult, I guess). For this last group, I can only understand the gist of the text without using a dictionary. However, the grammar is always absolutely clear and I can easily identify the grammatical roles and forms of words. This means that I can, in theory, crack a text in any Slavic language if I resort to using a dictionary and if I give myself plenty of time.

    In terms of spoken language, I undertand Macedonian, Bulgarian, and Slovene very well, though, of course, not perfectly. For instance, I often watch Slovene TV on the internet and do not have to focus too hard to understand almost everything. Also, I have spoken to Macedonians and Slovenes in Serbo-Croatian and been spoken to in their respective languages and it worked, though it wasn't always easy. This doesn't usually happen, though, as most Slovenes and Macedonians are able to shift their speech toward SC at least a bit.

    As for Bulgarian, I recall being at a museum in Greece once and stumbling upon a guided tour in Bulgarian (my group had no guide of our own). I joined this group and understood pretty much everything the guide said (though, again, not 100%).

    When flying Czech Airlines between North America and Europe, I always make a point of taking a peek at their magazine (in Czech and English). I find that I can read it if I really focus hard, but it does require a lot of mental gymnastics and guessing (as Jana mentioned above).

    As a comparison, it might be useful to mention that, Spanish being the only Romance language I speak, I am able to read Italian, Catalan, Galician, and Portuguese texts such as newspapers and magazines with ease (I can also read scholarly articles in linguistics in these languages) and without a dictionary. I believe I could manage Occitan almost as well as Catalan. French is a bit tougher, but I can read it too. Romanian, Aromanian, Rhaeto-Romance, Friulian, Neapolitan, Franco-Provencal and other Romance languages are much harder for me. Now here's the thing: given a choice between a Russian or Czech text and one in Italian or Catalan, I would always pick the latter, as it would be much easier for me to read these fluently and without too much guessing.

    When I was in Italy, I found that I could use my Spanish when the locals were unable to communicate in English, though I often had to backtrack and 'modify' my Spanish to sound more Italian (e.g. by using an Italian form if I knew it or could guess at it, modifying my plural markers and verb endings, and, of course, speaking very slowly and deliberately).

    In the Czech Republic, I find that I can get by using Serbo-Croatian in stores (when the person I'm talking to does not speak English), though it's not always a breeze. Once, I remember trying to buy a "sveska" (notebook), but the sales clerk had no idea what I meant. After a lot of miming and pointing, she understood that I wanted a "teka". I thought, "Drat! This is the Croatian word!", but, alas, it hadn't crossed my mind!

    A couple of years ago, in Kladno near Prague, I remember being unable to get a "phone card" from a lady at a local store, but when I asked for a "telefonska kartica", she smiled and gave me one right away. I also could have guessed and said something in fake Czech ("telefonni kartichka?"), but that would have been the solution at the next level of desperation

  16. #196
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Transatlantic View Post
    O.K. The only Slavic language I speak is Serbo-Croatian (the Serbian standard). I find that my understanding of various Slavic languages varies according to the type of discourse I am trying to comprehend. For instance, it is much easier for me to understand contextually rich written texts which use 'general' vocabulary (say, a newspaper article) than relatively poorly contextualized texts such as poetry. Also, understanding written texts is always easier for me than understanding speech in other Slavic languages. Within spoken language, TV (especially news) is much easier than regular rapid-fire conversation.

    A caveat: I'm a linguist (but do not specialize in Slavic linguistics), which makes me acutely aware of language form and language variation, so you could say that I am better able to extrapolate from not-completely-transparent linguistic data than your average Joe.

    Anyways, I find that I can read the following Slavic languages (other than Serbo-Croatian) with ease: Macedonian, Slovene, and Bulgarian. If pressed, I can understand a Russian text fairly well. Slovak and Pannonian Rusyn would be next. I find Czech and Polish more difficult, as well as Ukrainian and Belorussian (the two Sorbian languages and Cassubian would be even more difficult, I guess). For this last group, I can only understand the gist of the text without using a dictionary. However, the grammar is always absolutely clear and I can easily identify the grammatical roles and forms of words. This means that I can, in theory, crack a text in any Slavic language if I resort to using a dictionary and if I give myself plenty of time.

    In terms of spoken language, I undertand Macedonian, Bulgarian, and Slovene very well, though, of course, not perfectly. For instance, I often watch Slovene TV on the internet and do not have to focus too hard to understand almost everything. Also, I have spoken to Macedonians and Slovenes in Serbo-Croatian and been spoken to in their respective languages and it worked, though it wasn't always easy. This doesn't usually happen, though, as most Slovenes and Macedonians are able to shift their speech toward SC at least a bit.

    As for Bulgarian, I recall being at a museum in Greece once and stumbling upon a guided tour in Bulgarian (my group had no guide of our own). I joined this group and understood pretty much everything the guide said (though, again, not 100%).

    When flying Czech Airlines between North America and Europe, I always make a point of taking a peek at their magazine (in Czech and English). I find that I can read it if I really focus hard, but it does require a lot of mental gymnastics and guessing (as Jana mentioned above).

    As a comparison, it might be useful to mention that, Spanish being the only Romance language I speak, I am able to read Italian, Catalan, Galician, and Portuguese texts such as newspapers and magazines with ease (I can also read scholarly articles in linguistics in these languages) and without a dictionary. I believe I could manage Occitan almost as well as Catalan. French is a bit tougher, but I can read it too. Romanian, Aromanian, Rhaeto-Romance, Friulian, Neapolitan, Franco-Provencal and other Romance languages are much harder for me. Now here's the thing: given a choice between a Russian or Czech text and one in Italian or Catalan, I would always pick the latter, as it would be much easier for me to read these fluently and without too much guessing.

    When I was in Italy, I found that I could use my Spanish when the locals were unable to communicate in English, though I often had to backtrack and 'modify' my Spanish to sound more Italian (e.g. by using an Italian form if I knew it or could guess at it, modifying my plural markers and verb endings, and, of course, speaking very slowly and deliberately).

    In the Czech Republic, I find that I can get by using Serbo-Croatian in stores (when the person I'm talking to does not speak English), though it's not always a breeze. Once, I remember trying to buy a "sveska" (notebook), but the sales clerk had no idea what I meant. After a lot of miming and pointing, she understood that I wanted a "teka". I thought, "Drat! This is the Croatian word!", but, alas, it hadn't crossed my mind!

    A couple of years ago, in Kladno near Prague, I remember being unable to get a "phone card" from a lady at a local store, but when I asked for a "telefonska kartica", she smiled and gave me one right away. I also could have guessed and said something in fake Czech ("telefonni kartichka?"), but that would have been the solution at the next level of desperation

    I find it interesting that Slovak is the easiest Western Slavonic language for you to understand. A lot of native speakers of Eastern and Southern Slavonic languages say so as well, even though it's often just "slightly more" than Czech or Polish.

  17. #197
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Transatlantic View Post
    O.K. The only Slavic language I speak is Serbo-Croatian (the Serbian standard). I find that my understanding of various Slavic languages varies according to the type of discourse I am trying to comprehend. For instance, it is much easier for me to understand contextually rich written texts which use 'general' vocabulary (say, a newspaper article) than relatively poorly contextualized texts such as poetry. Also, understanding written texts is always easier for me than understanding speech in other Slavic languages. Within spoken language, TV (especially news) is much easier than regular rapid-fire conversation.

    A caveat: I'm a linguist (but do not specialize in Slavic linguistics), which makes me acutely aware of language form and language variation, so you could say that I am better able to extrapolate from not-completely-transparent linguistic data than your average Joe.

    Anyways, I find that I can read the following Slavic languages (other than Serbo-Croatian) with ease: Macedonian, Slovene, and Bulgarian. If pressed, I can understand a Russian text fairly well. Slovak and Pannonian Rusyn would be next. I find Czech and Polish more difficult, as well as Ukrainian and Belorussian (the two Sorbian languages and Cassubian would be even more difficult, I guess). For this last group, I can only understand the gist of the text without using a dictionary. However, the grammar is always absolutely clear and I can easily identify the grammatical roles and forms of words. This means that I can, in theory, crack a text in any Slavic language if I resort to using a dictionary and if I give myself plenty of time.
    Does this however proof that Slavic languages are any closer to each other than Germanic and prehaps Romance languages. As far as Macedonian, Slovene and Bulgarian goes they are debatably dialects of the same language, although that's a sensitive issue. However, you then go onto only being able to understand the written language of other Slavic languages more distant to the South Slavic group.

    I am a native English speaker and have a very limited knowledge of French and German from my school-boy years. While if I was to hear a French or German speaker, I probably wouldn't have a clue what they were saying, if you gave me a text to translate in either of those languages, I could probably look over it and pick out familiar word and grammar forms and prehaps somewhat get the gist of the article. However, if I had a dictionary and a lot of time, I could probably translate the article fairly completely, and that goes for the other Germanic languages too.

    So, what I'm trying to say is, does the fact that you are able to translate written pieces of other Slavic language groups with aid of a dictionary really prove that Slavic languages are more mutually intelligible than other Indo-European groups, considering I don't even speak German or French and yet I am pretty confident that with a dictionary I could crack any Germanic or Romance language text merely based on similar grammatical structures and sometimes often familiar words.

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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    "As far as Macedonian, Slovene and Bulgarian goes they are debatably dialects of the same language"

    How can they be dialects of the same language if mutual understanding is about 10%? As Bulgarian I understand Russian ten times easier then Slovenian. Plus the grammer is as diferent as between Romance and Germanic languages. Its like saying that it is a sensative issue, but french and english are dialects of the same language...

    I don't think Slavic languages are closer then each other then Romance ones. Infact they are more divergent in terms of grammer. I find Germanic ones most diferent, maybe thanks to isolation from one another and heavy borrowing.
    Last edited by Kanes; 30th December 2008 at 4:19 AM.

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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Kanes View Post
    "As far as Macedonian, Slovene and Bulgarian goes they are debatably dialects of the same language"

    .
    Well, Macedonian and Bulgarian are certainly very close, and at risk of offending someone, probably the same language. However, I was always led to believe there was a greater degree of mutually intelligibility between Serbo-Croatian and Bulgarian than you're suggesting. I've read somewhere that between Bulgarian and particular dialects of Serbian there is quite a bit of mutual intelligibility.

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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by COF View Post
    Well, Macedonian and Bulgarian are certainly very close, and at risk of offending someone, probably the same language. However, I was always led to believe there was a greater degree of mutually intelligibility between Serbo-Croatian and Bulgarian than you're suggesting. I've read somewhere that between Bulgarian and particular dialects of Serbian there is quite a bit of mutual intelligibility.
    You're right, Bulgarian and Serbian are quite close. Slovenian is a whole different story and I don't understand it. The two languages are at the two end of the Southern Slavic continuum.

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