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Thread: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

  1. #401
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Bog Svarog View Post
    1. Bulgarian. Sometimes up to 100%, but sometimes as low as 20-30%, depending on dialect, speaker, content, etc.
    It can always happen between dialects. I was born in Central Bulgaria and live in Sofia, West Bulgaria, now. There are local western sentences that will be understood up to 0% in the village I was born. E.g. пунджепсорèси - пун джеб с орèси - пълен джоб с òрехи - полный карман с орехами (as heard - word breaks added - Standard/Eastern Bulgarian - Russian).

  2. #402
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Christo Tamarin View Post
    It can always happen between dialects. I was born in Central Bulgaria and live in Sofia, West Bulgaria, now. There are local western sentences that will be understood up to 0% in the village I was born. E.g. пунджепсорèси - пун джеб с орèси - пълен джоб с òрехи - полный карман с орехами (as heard - word breaks added - Standard/Eastern Bulgarian - Russian).
    + BCS pun džep s orasima.

  3. #403
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Christo Tamarin View Post
    пунджепсорèси
    I'd never understand that if I heard it spoken, especially fast.

  4. #404
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Orlin View Post
    + BCS pun džep s orasima.
    Pravilno bi bilo pun džep oraha.
    Beskrajni plavi krug i u njemu zvezda.

  5. #405
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Christo Tamarin View Post
    пунджепсорèси - пун джеб с орèси - пълен джоб с òрехи - полный карман с орехами
    (as heard - word breaks added - Standard/Eastern Bulgarian - Russian).

    Interesting. A historical overview of the change of syllabic -l- to -u- in BCS *1 is here.


    *1 To be more specific, author is writing specifically about Croatian, giving Croatian attestations.
    Last edited by DenisBiH; 26th October 2011 at 10:58 PM.

  6. #406
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by DenisBiH View Post
    Interesting. A historical overview of the change of syllabic -l- to -u- in BCS *1 is here.


    *1 To be more specific, author is writing specifically about Croatian, giving Croatian attestations.
    And пълен resembles the italian pieno, which also means full...
    Beskrajni plavi krug i u njemu zvezda.

  7. #407
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Christo Tamarin View Post
    Yes, you are completely wrong. The Bulgarian баща (father) is a Slavic word. It is a cognate to Russian батя with the same meaning. It is also a cognate to Bulgarian бате/батко (meaning elder brother).

    In Bulgarian, both татко/тате and баща are in active use. The word отец is archaic.

    Actually, all these words originate from the childish speech. The IE root we can see in Latin pater and English father is lost in Slavic.
    Nowadays Отец means father as in priest.

  8. #408
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by yael* View Post
    Pravilno bi bilo pun džep oraha.
    Očigledno, samo sam hteo napisati frazu na koju asociram napisano od Christa Tamarina i koja zvuči maksimalno blizu ovog "čudnog" zapadnobugarskog izraza.

  9. #409
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by bibax View Post
    It is an exaggeration. "Jak się masz? Jak se máš? Kako se imaš?" is a widespread greeting and not only in the Slavic-speaking world.
    We also use this expression in Ukrainian: Як ся маєш? It means: ​How are you?

  10. #410
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Praviľno po-russki: Полный карман орехов.
    Česky: Kapsa plná ořechů.

    We need no preposition. We use genitive plural.
    And пълен resembles the italian pieno, which also means full.
    It also resembles Latin plenus, Germanic voll, full, Lithuanian pilnas and Sanskrit purna (cf. Annapurna, Goddess of the Harvests = full of food). In fact these words are cognates. In Protoslavic: pьlnъ.

  11. #411
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by bibax View Post
    Praviľno po-russki: Полный карман орехов.
    Česky: Kapsa plná ořechů.

    We need no preposition. We use genitive plural.
    Спасибо, и я так думал, но не был полностью уверен. Вы мне помогли вспомнить правильное управление в случае.

  12. #412
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    So only Bulgarian (and probably Macedonian) uses the preposition s/sa...
    Beskrajni plavi krug i u njemu zvezda.

  13. #413
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Both is acceptable in non-standard dialectal registers of SC

    Pun žep z urehi

    Pun žep urehe

  14. #414
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    U malo drugačijoj konstrukciji bi išao instrumental: Džep napunjen/ispunjen orasima.

    Mislim da se zbog odsustva padeža u Bugarskom i Makedonskom predlozi koriste nešto više nego u ostalim slovenskim jezicima.

  15. #415
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Christo Tamarin View Post
    Yes, you are completely wrong. The Bulgarian баща (father) is a Slavic word. It is a cognate to Russian батя with the same meaning. It is also a cognate to Bulgarian бате/батко (meaning elder brother).

    In Bulgarian, both татко/тате and баща are in active use. The word отец is archaic.

    Actually, all these words originate from the childish speech. The IE root we can see in Latin pater and English father is lost in Slavic.
    Батo/батко exist in Macedonian too. While тато/татко is the most common word for father, in the East near the Bulgarian border (in Berovo for example) they say башча. Отец is archaic and used exclusively in religion.

  16. #416
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Christo Tamarin View Post
    The IE root we can see in Latin pater and English father is lost in Slavic.
    Well, boter (= godfather) in Slovenian comes from that root (via Old German), according to Snoj. I'm not sure about other Slavic languages, though. (But you're right, the IE root itself had apparently been lost, then introduced from Old German.)
    Last edited by TriglavNationalPark; 6th November 2011 at 4:57 PM.

  17. #417
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by Christo Tamarin View Post
    It can always happen between dialects. I was born in Central Bulgaria and live in Sofia, West Bulgaria, now. There are local western sentences that will be understood up to 0% in the village I was born. E.g. пунджепсорèси - пун джеб с орèси - пълен джоб с òрехи - полный карман с орехами (as heard - word breaks added - Standard/Eastern Bulgarian - Russian).

    My grandparents use phrases like this all the time Can anyone guess what " Окендрил се пужел на гранкю па нюри" - "Okendril se pujel na grankju pa njuri" means?

  18. #418
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by trosheniorasi View Post
    My grandparents use phrases like this all the time Can anyone guess what " Окендрил се пужел на гранкю па нюри" - "Okendril se pujel na grankju pa njuri" means?
    Someone did something to themselves and then something else happened

  19. #419
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkChild View Post
    Someone did something to themselves and then something else happened
    Wow! I didn't know it would be that indecipherable. Укендрил (качил) се пужел (охлюф) на гранкю (пръчка approx) па (и) нюри (почива approx).

    Охлюф се е покачил на пръчка и си почива/A snail has climbed on a stick and is resting


    Actually this is approximate, since I can't think of a literal translation for гранкю апd нюри in any language.

  20. #420
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    Re: All Slavic languages: Mutual intelligibility

    Quote Originally Posted by TriglavNationalPark View Post
    Well, boter (= godfather) in Slovenian comes from that root (via Old German), according to Snoj. I'm not sure about other Slavic languages, though. (But you're right, the IE root itself had apparently been lost, then introduced from Old German.)
    I can't recall exactly where I have read it, but I believe that some claim that that root may have been preserved in an altered form in the name of the deity Stribog, which may have been derived from PIE *Dyēus ph2ter via some irregular change. However, there seem to exist other theories, and the etyomology of that name seems to be still disputed.

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