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Thread: weather myths

  1. #21
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Broccolicious View Post
    My Spanish aunt used to tell me that my (bad) singing would make it rain. Given that I was living in Galicia at the time, where it seemed to rain every day, I started to believe her!
    I always wondered if the story in Asterix (Assurancetourix the tone deaf bard and the way he would bring rain by singing off key) was based on an actual legend. Maybe there's more to what your aunt was saying than just a joke


    Over here, we have plenty of weather-related superstitions. A well-known one is that when animals are restless and agitated, the weather would worsen soon (I guess they feel the changes sooner than we do, but they don't make them happen ). It makes for a very insulting remark: when people argue, they're told to stop it because they're bringing storms about.
    "I know exactly what words I am wanting to say, but somehow or other they is always getting squiffsquiddled around" - The BFG/Roald Dahl

  2. #22
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by dudasd View Post
    If it's raining and the sun is shining at the same time, a witch is born somewhere.
    Lightning won't strike nettle.
    Košava (strong eastern wind coming through the valley of the river Danube) blows 1, 3 or 7 days.
    On Candlemass day (February 15th by Eastern calender): if the female bear leaves her den and sees her own shadow, she will go back for six more weeks. (That is: if the weather is sunny, the winter is going to last.)
    Days between Christmas and Epiphany show what the weather will be like in the following months. (So the first day foretells January, the second foretells February etc.)

    Esto me recuerda que en México existen las cabañuelas, durante todo el mes de enero se pronóstica como va a ser el tiempo el resto del año.

    1 of January: Forcasts the weather for January
    2 of January: Forcasts the weather for February and so on..

    The 13th of January tells the weather for December and then we start a count-down so the 24th tells the weather for January again.

    When it rains with sunshine someone's dying somewhere (isn't someone always dying somewhere?) and a baby deer is being born.

  3. #23
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    Re: weather myths

    There is a French saying: "Soleil de mars rend fou" (in March, the sun drives you crazy).
    It is probably a myth, because even if you have lost the habit of sun exposure at the end of winter, the sun doesn't shine so bright in most parts of France in March!...
    Com as palavras todo cuidado é pouco, mudam de opinião como as pessoas. (José Saramago)

  4. #24
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    Re: weather myths

    In Canada, on February 5, if the town groundhog sees its shadow then winter will last for five more weeks. If it doesn't, then winter will end soon. As far as I know, this is a distinct Canadian tradition, not observed in any other culture.
    Introduzca su firma aquí

  5. #25
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by vince View Post
    In Canada, on February 5, if the town groundhog sees its shadow then winter will last for five more weeks. If it doesn't, then winter will end soon. As far as I know, this is a distinct Canadian tradition, not observed in any other culture.
    Actually, this is exactly the same as in the United States, except there Groundhog's Day is on Feb. 2.
    Please correct me, in any language!

  6. #26
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    Re: weather myths

    I have heard that the Groundhog's Day myth was brought to Pennsylvania by Germans who transferred the purported abilities of the badger back home to the American woodchuck (groundhog). February 2 is midway between the December solstice and the March equinox. The six weeks in question ends with the March equinox, the traditional beginning of Spring.

    If March comes in like/as a lamb, it will go out like/as a lion, and vice versa. [March weather is notoriously variable]

    Red sky in the morning, sailor take warning; red sky at night, sailor's delight. [Clouds in the west will probably come toward you; clouds in the east have already past.]

    There is some myth about a "ring around the moon", but I don't recall what it says.

    Some people believe the particular terrain of where they live will protect them from tornados. For example, that a tornado will strike a particular side of a hill and then "jump over". Unfortunately tornados don't follow our rules.

  7. #27
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Forero View Post
    ...Red sky in the morning, sailor take warning; red sky at night, sailor's delight. [Clouds in the west will probably come toward you; clouds in the east have already past.]....
    I'm sure sailors have plenty of weather-related sayings! Another one I know is "Mackerel skies and mare's tails make lofty ships carry low sails"!

  8. #28
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    Re: weather myths

    Originally Posted by vince
    In Canada, on February 5, if the town groundhog sees its shadow then winter will last for five more weeks. If it doesn't, then winter will end soon. As far as I know, this is a distinct Canadian tradition, not observed in any other culture.
    Quote Originally Posted by tenseconds View Post
    Actually, this is exactly the same as in the United States, except there Groundhog's Day is on Feb. 2.
    Not only is Groundhog Day on February 2nd; but if the groundhog sees its shadow, winter lasts six more weeks, not five. Since we'd have been lucky to have only six weeks of winter, as opposed to eight or nine, we never paid much attention to the groundhog. Now, with global warming, Wiarton Willy's predictions are a little more probable.

    There are all sorts of Canadian weather predictions involving animals, but it's difficult to avoid them turning into a list. I'll limit myself to a very few predictions, not all of them animal-related: it will rain if a dog eats grass and then throws it up; if the robin sings "Cheer up!" over and over again; if a woodlouse curls into a ball if you disturb it; if the sunrise is particularly red; if there is a ring around the moon; or if there are sundogs in the sky in the afternoon. The sunrise, moonring and sundogs are actually quite good predictors, so they don't really count as weather myths.

    As for the rain actually stopping, my great aunts in England all used to say that it would clear up if there were enough blue in the sky "to make a pair of Dutchman's breeches".
    "The trouble with normal is it always gets worse." Bruce Cockburn

  9. #29
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaska Ñawi View Post
    or if there are sundogs in the sky in the afternoon.
    Erm... what's a sundog, please?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaska Ñawi View Post
    As for the rain actually stopping, my great aunts in England all used to say that it would clear up if there were enough blue in the sky "to make a pair of Dutchman's breeches".
    Oh yes! My grandmother used to ask if there was enough blue sky to make a sailor a pair of trousers!

  10. #30
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Broccolicious View Post
    Erm... what's a sundog, please?
    A sun dog is a copy (or follower) of the sun, usually at 22 degrees from the real sun. Like a rainbow (from liquid water), it indicates water (usually hexagonal ice crystals) in the atmosphere other than water vapor. As Chaska Ñawi said, such indications of weather to the west are good predictors of weather to come, so sayings about "red sky", "sun dogs", "rainbows", "ring around the moon", etc., in the west do not really qualify as myths.

    The version of the Groundhog Day saying I have heard is actually true too, but rather vacuously: If the Groundhog sees his shadow, we will have six more (long) weeks of winter; if he doesn't, then Spring is "just around the corner" (to me that means about six [short] weeks away).

  11. #31
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by pup View Post
    I recently heard that in Spain, there is a myth that the wind makes you go mad... is this true?

    Recientemente, he oido que en Espana, hay un mito que el viento vuelve loco... es verdad?
    El mataburro explica que una persona aventada es alguien que procede sin reflexión.

    En “Feng Shui”, feng significa viento y shui, agua; y, según explica un sitio australiano que detalla el significado de ciertos nombres chinos, bajo el subtítulo de “Asian Villain Names”, “Feng” significa “mad”; ¡qué lo confirme algún forero chino, por favor!

    No creo que sean casualidades: se afirma que el viento cálido, al producir cambios importantes en la temperatura, produce estrés térmico: aumenta la frecuencia cardiaca y el ritmo respiratorio, y sí, te pone de un humor espantoso, reduce la capacidad mental, no te concentras, disminuyen tus reflejos y parece ser que hay más accidentes de tráfico.

    Yo soy un lego total y absoluto, pero, al ver que, en un sitio de psicoterapeutas catalanes, ofrecen bajar un libro que se llama: “La metodología de la investigación en biometeorología psiquiátrica”, imagino que esto del viento, de mito, debe de tener muy poco.

    Aporto algunos dichos camperos, a propósito del clima:

    “Norte duro, Pampero seguro”
    “Viento del este, agua como peste”
    “Norte claro, sur oscuro, aguacero seguro”
    “Cielo empedrado, suelo mojado”
    “Animales perezosos, tiempo tormentoso”

    Cordial saludo.

    A.A.
    Matar en nombre de Dios es una aberración. Papa Francisco

  12. #32
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by dudasd View Post
    If it's raining and the sun is shining at the same time, a witch is born somewhere.
    Lightning won't strike nettle.
    Košava (strong eastern wind coming through the valley of the river Danube) blows 1, 3 or 7 days.
    On Candlemass day (February 15th by Eastern calender): if the female bear leaves her den and sees her own shadow, she will go back for six more weeks. (That is: if the weather is sunny, the winter is going to last.)
    Days between Christmas and Epiphany show what the weather will be like in the following months. (So the first day foretells January, the second foretells February etc.)
    Now that's interesting. In Puerto Rico the custom is to check the weather the first 12 days of the year, each day corresponding to one of the 12 months of the year. If it rains on Janaury 1st, Janauary will be a wet month, and so one. If it rains with the sun out, the witches are dancing.

    Noel

  13. #33
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Adolfo Afogutu View Post
    “Norte duro, Pampero seguro”
    “Viento del este, agua como peste”
    “Norte claro, sur oscuro, aguacero seguro”
    “Cielo empedrado, suelo mojado”
    “Animales perezosos, tiempo tormentoso”.
    This made me think of a similar poem in Finnish (southwestern dialect):
    "Ku lännest klaara, ei ol satte vaara" (When the sky is clearing in the west, there's no risk of rain).

    There are hundreds of similar weather forecasting phrases that are not myths but rather facts. Of course there are myths, too:

    "If a cat eats hay, it's going to rain."

    Then there is a myth about Finnish sailors in the sailing vessels time: Finns were very appreciated sailors as they had a magic ability to call for wind in the calm; a Finnish sailor scratched the mast with his fingernails and spoke the strange words of his own language, and before long a good wind came to push the ship forward.

  14. #34
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    Re: weather myths

    My grandfather used to relate weather to fishing:

    When the wind is in the east,
    Tis time for neither man nor beast.
    When the wind is from the south,
    It blows the bait to the fish's mouth.
    When the wind is from the north,
    then neither man nor fish go forth.
    When the wind is from the west,
    That's the time the fish like best.
    "The trouble with normal is it always gets worse." Bruce Cockburn

  15. #35
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    Re: weather myths

    When children made funny faces or otherwise behaved unseemingly, my paternal grandma would warn them "The wind might turn, making you stay that way."

    Children often pick up ladybirds/ladybugs when available, and chant to them that if they fly away, tomorrow´s weather wil be fine.

  16. #36
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    Re: weather myths

    Oh, yes, so many are coming back to me now .... people used to believe that it would rain if you killed a spider. (My grandmother's generation also believed that if a spider walked on you, it meant that you'd get a new dress.)

    Many people here still believe that wide bands on a woolly bear caterpillar signify a hard winter to come (actually the bands get wider as the caterpillar ages). Another common belief is that northern lights in the autumn fortell an Indian summer and a mild winter; northern lights in the spring fortell a long winter and a chilly spring.
    "The trouble with normal is it always gets worse." Bruce Cockburn

  17. #37
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaska Ñawi View Post
    Oh, yes, so many are coming back to me now .... people used to believe that it would rain if you killed a spider.
    Sweden, too.

  18. #38
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by ewie View Post
    There's an ancient myth in the UK whereby when cows lie down it's going to rain. If this were indeed the case, British cows would need springs instead of legs.
    Existe en el Reino Unido un mito vetusto según el que cuando las vacas se tumban va a llover. (Pero véase 'Galicia' en el #4).
    Have you ever heard of the theory that if cows lie down, which they do, its to keep the grass dry for after the rain.


    On another note, we say that if you are pulling a strange face, grimacing, or something similar, that if the wind changes direction, your face will stay that way.

  19. #39
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by ewie View Post
    There's an ancient myth in the UK whereby when cows lie down it's going to rain. If this were indeed the case, British cows would need springs instead of legs.
    Existe en el Reino Unido un mito vetusto según el que cuando las vacas se tumban va a llover. (Pero véase 'Galicia' en el #4).
    This myth also exists in the United States, at least in the Mid-Atlantic region.
    Este mito también existe en los Estados Unidos, o por lo menos en la región del Atlántico Medio.

  20. #40
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    Re: weather myths

    In Ecuador, when it rains and there is sun at the same time, the saying is "Se casa el diablo con la bruja" (the devil is marrying the witch), or, another variation is “se casa el diablo con la diabla (the devil is marrying the she-devil). It’s interesting how this meteorological event means different things all over the world, but many of these myths seem to have to do with witches or the devil.

    Another whether related saying we have is “abril, aguas mil; mayo, hasta que se pudra el sayo”. This means “in April, a thousand showers; in May, until your smock rots”. This usually proves to be true, because April and May are the months of the year when it rains the most in Ecuador.

    Yet another myth is the ‘Cordonazo de San Francisco’. October 4 is the day of Saint Francis of Assisi, patron Saint of Quito, Ecuador. Supposedly, on October fourth, we have Saint Francis’ Cordonazo (cord whipping). This is a heavy rainfall accompanied by a thunder and hailstorm that almost always happens on or around October fourth. Apparently, the origin of the myth is that when the devil would come to strike Saint Francis, the Saint would get rid of the devil by whipping the air with his cord. When he did this, a huge thunder and hailstorm was created and this would frighten the devil away.

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