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Thread: weather myths

  1. #41
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by dudasd View Post
    If it's raining and the sun is shining at the same time, a witch is born somewhere.
    ...
    A witch in a negative sense or simply a woman (or man?) that can do magic?

  2. #42
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by dudasd View Post
    If it's raining and the sun is shining at the same time, a witch is born somewhere.
    On Candlemass day (February 15th by Eastern calender): if the female bear leaves her den and sees her own shadow, she will go back for six more weeks. (That is: if the weather is sunny, the winter is going to last.)
    Days between Christmas and Epiphany show what the weather will be like in the following months. (So the first day foretells January, the second foretells February etc.)
    In Galicia, when it rains and the sun is shining at the same time, there is a saying that the witches are combing their hair.
    Another saying goes: se chove e fai sol, anda o demo no Ferrol, i.e., if it is raining and sunny at the same time, the devil is loose around the town of Ferrol. This one rhymes, and some people think it started as a pun from the fact that Ferrol is Franco's birthplace.

    About Candlemass (February 2nd): Se a Candelaria chora, o inverno vai fóra, se a Candelaria ri, o inverno está por vir: for the sake of rhyme, rain is equated to tears and would imply the end of winter soon, fair weather is equated to laughter signifying that winter is here to stay. But, the saying ends thus: Ría ou chore, chore ou volva rir, medio inverno vai fóra e medio está por vir: i.e. regardless of one or the other, half of winter is gone and half is yet to come, as Candlemass lies half-way betwen the winter solstice and the vernal equinox.

    The weather on each of the first twelve days of the year is also said to predict the weather for the relevant month (January 1 for January, January 2 for February, and so forth)

    One more:
    Lúa nova treboada, un mes mollada: thunder with a new moon means one month of rain will follow.

    And yes, it rains a lot in Galicia. Folk myth has it that on the seventh day of Creation, God rested His hand on the coast of Galicia and the imprint He left became the Rías Baixas http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...hWOAplwxN_-M-A (which are not rivers, estuaries or creeks as they are sometimes misleadingly translated to), and an emerald on a ring He wore gave its colour to the land, so He decreed eternal rain to keep the land that colour (if I am not mistaken, there is a similar Irish legend).

    However, as many a myth, it is probably not true, because we also enjoy the sunshine in the Rías Baixas, and according to The Guardian, the nicest beach in the world http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...ixWGIZzSIFJscA .

  3. #43
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    Re: weather myths

    In New York, when I was a kid, my parents always told me that when there was a thunderstorm, the angels were bowling. When lightning hit the ground and the thunder was loud, my mom would yell, STRIKE!!!
    No matter how much the cats fight, there always seem to be plenty of kittens. -- Abraham Lincoln

  4. #44
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    Re: weather myths

    Of course, it is the truth, and not a myth... that in Ireland, lepracháns live at the bottom of the rainbow guarding their pots of gold. Following the rainbow is the only way you will find their pot of gold, and if you do find them, they are obliged to let you keep the gold.
    I have been trying for years, but never seem to get to the end of the rainbow...

  5. #45
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by pup View Post
    Recientemente, he oido que en Espana, hay un mito que el viento vuelve loco... es verdad?
    Yo lo he oído también, especialmente en Cádiz cuando sopla el levante que es un viento persistente (5-7 días) y muy desagradable.

  6. #46
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    Re: weather myths

    Well, back to the original "weather myth" posted, here in Toulouse there is a specific wind that blows quite often, "le vent d'Autan", and this wind is told to make people go mad.
    Actually a colleague of mine, who lives in the country and is more exposed to it in his house, always complains about that wind as soon as it rises, accusing it of giving headache, bad sleep and several other "diseases".

  7. #47
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Miguelillo 87 View Post
    En México tenemos el mito de que si llueve en el día de tu boda, va a ser un matrimonio lleno de lagrimas, o sea sufrimiento.
    In France, it's the opposite:
    "Mariage pluvieux, mariage heureux."
    "Rainy wedding, happy marriage"

    (I don't know if it's really a weather myth, but French people say it's always raining in Normandy This always hurts :'()


  8. #48
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by DearPrudence View Post
    In France, it's the opposite:
    "Mariage pluvieux, mariage heureux."
    "Rainy wedding, happy marriage"

    (I don't know if it's really a weather myth, but French people say it's always raining in Normandy This always hurts :'()
    Also in Spain: boda lluviosa, boda dichosa.

  9. #49
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    Re: weather myths

    And in Italian: sposa bagnata, sposa fortunata.

  10. #50
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    Re: weather myths

    Where I live the myth is that when the cows all lay down in the pasture it's going to rain.
    A lo que te truje chencha

  11. #51
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by chics View Post
    En cuanto a las bodas, aquí se dice que "novia mojada, novia afortunada".
    My grandma always said that, if a man married in spring, he wanted a wife, but if he married in winter, he wanted a servant.

    Quote Originally Posted by dudasd View Post
    Days between Christmas and Epiphany show what the weather will be like in the following months. (So the first day foretells January, the second foretells February etc.)
    I've just read that in other parts of Spain the myth goes like that, and I'm astonished, because in Extremadura, it's just the opposite! August the first is "el juicio del año" (the year's judgment) and the twelve following days are "las canículas": their weather tells you what time next year's months will have (August the second for January, August the third for February, and so on).

    And I remember fondly a story my grandpa told me when I was little:
    "On the first day of the year, the clouds and Saint Peter met in Sierra Morena to decide which cloud would give rain to which part of Spain, and so Saint Peter started to tell the clouds:
    "You will go to Galicia, and you, to Castilla La Vieja, and you, to Canarias..."
    And soon, all the clouds parted, after arranging to meet when the year was almost over at the same place, to see how everyone had been doing.
    When they met again, Saint Peter asked the clouds where each one had been, and if everything had gone well. After the clouds finished telling him, he asked:
    "But... did no one of you go to Extremadura?"
    After a bit of thought and asking, it was clear that no clouds had been to Extremadura that year, and so Saint Peter decided:
    "Okay, now, off to Extremadura you all go!" ("Pues ahora, ¡todas a Extremadura!")

    And that's why that, when in the rest of Spain it's raining, it doesn't fall a single drop in Extremadura, but when in the rest of Spain is sunny and nice, here we have huge and long, long storms."

    I always loved that tale

    Cheers!
    Last edited by Hacha; 13th March 2011 at 12:03 AM.
    Errar es humano, pero echarle la culpa a otro es más humano todavía.

  12. #52
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Hacha View Post
    My grandma always said that, if a man married in spring, he wanted a wife, but if he married in winter, he wanted a servant.
    Why?

  13. #53
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    Re: weather myths

    I guess it's because in spring it's all more beautiful and romantic, and he would be thinking about her and how he loves her, while marrying in winter gives the impression that he just wants to get all the procedures done as quickly and cheaply possibly, so he can go and have a wife who cooks and cleans for him.

    Cheers!
    Errar es humano, pero echarle la culpa a otro es más humano todavía.

  14. #54
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by Ibermanolo View Post
    Yo lo he oído también, especialmente en Cádiz cuando sopla el levante que es un viento persistente (5-7 días) y muy desagradable.
    Lo afirmo, el viento de levante suele provocar hasta dolor de cabeza que te dura mientras sopla el viento.

    Saludos

  15. #55
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by chics View Post
    ¡Hola!


    En cuanto a las bodas, aquí se dice que "novia mojada, novia afortunada". Y lo de mojada se refiere a la lluvia. O sea, que si llueve en tu boda te trae suerte.

    À semelhança do que disseram chics e outros, em Portugal também usamos uma variante dessa expressão: "Boda molhada, boda abençoada".

    E já que falamos em casamentos (bodas) e ventos, também é corrente dizer, quando por algum motivo queremos criticar a Espanha ou os espanhóis, dizemos em forma de gozo "De Espanha, nem bom vento nem bom casamento" :P


    Just like chiks and others said, in Portugal we also use a similar form: "wet wedding, blessed wedding".

    When, for some reason we want to criticise Spain or spanish people, we say, to joke around "From Spain, neither good wind nor good wedding"


  16. #56
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    Re: weather myths

    I believed this when I was a kid: When it rained, I was told (and really believed) that we shouldn't touch our hair or anything made of iron because lightning could hit us.

    Oh, and my favorite one:

    !No te mires en el espejo porque te va a caer un rayo!
    (Don't look at the mirror because lightning is gonna hit you!)

    So, yeah, thunderstorms were a little bit scary.


    Not anymore.
    Last edited by Ruize; 18th March 2011 at 7:47 PM. Reason: Grammar
    Funk! Funk! Funk!

  17. #57
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    Re: weather myths

    An AE classic - "Earthquake weather" - gray, calm, warm, quiet.
    Last edited by GalileoGalilei; 28th March 2011 at 2:00 AM.

  18. #58
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    Re: weather myths

    En Galicia hay una frase que dice "gaivotas na terra, mariñeiros á merda" (seagulls to land, sailors to "shit"). Significa que si las gaviotas dejan de volar sobre el mar para venir a tierra, en breve comenzará a llover. Y es verdad, las gaviotas parecen anticipar el mal tiempo antes que las personas. Relacionado con ese, está "cielo empedrado, suelo mojado". Cuando el cielo se pone con nubes que parecen un enlosado de piedra, no tardará en llover.

    Otros refranes relacionados con la meteorología son "marzo ventoso y abril lluvioso hacen a mayo florido y hermoso" (windy March and rainy April, makes
    May beautiful and full of flowers), y también "Si marzo mayea, mayo marcea" (when the weather in March is as it should be in May, then in May it will be the other way round).

    Estos dos últimos no sé si se pueden considerar o no mitos, pero los dos primeros están más que comprobados.

  19. #59
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    Re: weather myths

    In Chile, earthquake weather is believed to be rather warm and sunny--at least in Santiago. This as opposed to the US/California where earthquake weather is calm and gray.
    By the way, suicide rates supposedly do go up when strong winds blow. Supposedly, during the Föhn winds in Southern Germany suicides go up during these winds. It actually seems a bit logical to me that really strong wind could drive some people mad--all the howling, etc...

  20. #60
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    Re: weather myths

    Quote Originally Posted by pup View Post
    I recently heard that in Spain, there is a myth that the wind makes you go mad... is this true?

    Recientemente, he oido que en Espana, hay un mito que el viento vuelve loco... es verdad?
    My ex-wife who was a school teacher told me that it was common knowledge amongst teachers that children behave much worse on windy days.

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