Ça va les chevilles ?

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by Meena94, Jun 24, 2013.

  1. Meena94

    Meena94 New Member

    Français
    Hi everyone,
    I'd like to know if there's an English equivalent for the French expression "Ça va les chevilles?". It comes from the expression "Avoir les chevilles qui enflent" which means someone thinks too highly of him/herself.
    For example if a friend is saying she is the prettiest girl I'd say her "Ça va les chevilles?". In fact, it gives us to understand "Ça va les chevilles (elles enflent pas)?".

    I don't know if I've been clear.
    Merci d'avance.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2013
  2. LankaFool Senior Member

    English - U.S.
    "Get over yourself" is probably the best one that comes to mind.

    Perhaps "Get off your high horse"? I don't really remember the last time I heard someone say this though, so it could be slightly dated.
     
  3. Meena94

    Meena94 New Member

    Français
    The French equivalent for "Get off your high horse" is "Monter sur ses grands chevaux" and I'm not sure it also means think oneself too highly, it better means getting angry quickly, I think.

    "Get over yourself" sounds better to me.

    Thanks for helping me : )
     
  4. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    When we say "Get off your high horse" to someone in English,
    it means "stop acting so arrogant, so superior."
    It does not have the notion of anger in English.
    See get off your high horse thread.

    That said, it is not that common anymore.
    Get over yourself is much more recent/in vogue.

    P.S. Welcome to the Forum, Meena94!
     
  5. Meena94

    Meena94 New Member

    Français
    I understand. I'd rather use "Get over yourself" then.

    Thank you Language Hound !
     
  6. Micia93

    Micia93 Senior Member

    in the center of France
    FRANCE FRENCH
    What I find interesting here is that the tone si entirely different, since the french requires a question mark when the english requires an exclamation mark, so it's more a correspondance of expressions than a pure translation here
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2013
  7. Suehil

    Suehil Medemod

    Tillou, France
    British English
    You could say "Did your trumpeter die?" or "Does your hat still fit?" referring to the expressions "You're blowing your own trumpet" and "you've got a big head" respectively.
    Neither is a set expression but both would be understood.
     
  8. broglet

    broglet Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    "Did your trumpeter die?" would mean nothing to me. "Does your hat still fit?" would stand more of a chance but I doubt that it would be widely understood. Perhaps these are more common in AE.
     
  9. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    Nope, those aren't AE.

    How's the view from up there?

    That'd be better for a snob, though, rather than someone who is overly impressed with her looks.
     
  10. emmsy

    emmsy Senior Member

    Orleans France
    UK English
    I would say "does your head still fit through the door? "
     
  11. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    Oh, very good. :D
     
  12. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    Something similar is suggested in WR dictionary

    Ça va, les chevilles ? familier colloquial Careful, or your head won't fit through that door!


    But I like Suehil's suggestion of : Does your hat still fit?
     
  13. i_roy Senior Member

    Another possibility, in english is "to have a swollen head" (la grosse tête)
     
  14. pointvirgule

    pointvirgule Senior Member

    Mtl, QC
    Français
    Une autre idée (sur un ton ironique) : Don't be so hard on yourself.
     
  15. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    Yes. I think Lankafool and I were responding with what Americans would most likely say in that situation rather than translating the clever but "indirect" French expression. We Americans tend to be much more direct, generally speaking, than the French.

    I personally like "Does your head still fit through the door?" and "Does your hat still fit?" but, sadly, I think they would not be immediately understood by your average American, especially the latter one. And I have I hard time imagining those being a typical American's expressions of choice in the context cited above.

    I would understand that in a literal sense, i.e., that someone was injured and, as a result, his or her head was literally swollen. But maybe that's because, according to this, it's BE. They provide "swelled head" as the equivalent in AE but, again, I don't think that is what an American would spontaneously say in the OP's situation.
     
  16. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    Or ("if a friend is saying she is the prettiest girl"):
    Your secret's safe with me.

    She might not be your friend for long though!
     
  17. Uncle Bob Senior Member

    Hungary
    British English
    It's a bit long but "What I most admire about you is your modesty" might do but you have to make sure it isn't taken literally.
     
  18. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    Could we may be combine pointvirgule's and Uncle Bob's ironic suggestions in : - Oh, come on, don't be so modest. Would that work?
     
  19. Meena94

    Meena94 New Member

    Français
    Thank you for all the suggestions.
    I personally like emmsy's one: "does your head still fit through the door?"

    But I don't understand your expression, Language Hound. Could you explain please. : )
     
  20. Omelette

    Omelette Senior Member

    London
    UK English
    I think the idea behind the Hound’s suggestion is that only she thinks she’s exceptionally pretty. It’s her fantasy. No one else views her like that. So it would work like this:
    ‘You know, I think most men find me irresistibly attractive’.
    ‘Your secret’s safe with me’.
     
  21. Meena94

    Meena94 New Member

    Français
    In fact, I understand the idea but it's the sentence "Your secret's
    safe with me" I don't get it.

    Litteraly it means you won't tell anyone about what someone tells you, doesn't it? I can't see what's the connection here.
    Or maybe it depends on the context.

    For example, If someone tells me a secret, I'll say "Your secret's safe with me" so the person will understand I'll keep the secret.
    But if I say that to my friend who thinks she's the prettiest, will she (or whoever speaking English) understand I mean "don't get over yourself"?

    I'm sorry you may find me taxing.
     
  22. Uncle Bob Senior Member

    Hungary
    British English
    It was a "secret" because she is the only one who knows she is the prettiest - everybody else, who can see her, wouldn't come to that conclusion. She boasted to the speaker, who now knows her "secret", but the speaker says he/she won't tell the others, who will continue to think she is plain/ugly/not very pretty.

    PS As Language Hound indicated it's a rather offensive joke.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2013
  23. Meena94

    Meena94 New Member

    Français
    Ok I understand now!

    Thanks a lot =D
     
  24. parieur Senior Member

    "Stop blowing your own trumpet!"
     
  25. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    I'm more familiar with "blowing one's own horn".
    However that, in French, would normally be: Cesse de vanter tes propres louanges... and (I think) has more to do with praising one's accomplishments.
    "Prettiness" is hardly one.

    In my opinion, the expression suggested in the WR dictionary, or emmsy's version with a question mark (posts 10 and 12) are closer (with the idea of "swelling")

    But I do like pointvirgule and Language Hound ironic suggestions.
     
  26. broglet

    broglet Senior Member

    London
    English - England
    Blowing one's own horn (which can be anatomically challenging) and 'swelling' have different connotations in BE and are best avoided (at least in the current context) :rolleyes:

    If you fancy a bit of irony a better riposte might be 'well the competition can't be too intense'
     
  27. Nicomon

    Nicomon Senior Member

    Montréal
    Français, Québec ♀
    I wrote that I was more familiar with the "horn" than the "trumpet" version... but neither would be my choice to translate « ça va, les chevilles ? »

    And I meant the idea of "swelling" or rather "swollen" that I see in both the French expression and suggested English versions : "Does your head still fit through the door? / Careful, or your head won't fit through that door! " not the word itself. :rolleyes:
     
  28. Language Hound Senior Member

    American English
    Sorry I was not able to respond sooner. I think Omelette and Uncle Bob did a good job explaining for me. (Thank you!:))

    The ironic use of "Your secret's safe with me" is very common, in AE at least, in situations like the one you cite.
    It does have the added element of insult/put-down here (unlike ça va les chevilles ?) since you're basically telling the person
    that she is not the prettiest girl.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013

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