1. flippantfolly Junior Member

    uk
    Does this mean quite rightly? for example on ne peut pas dire - á raison - qu'il a tort
     
  2. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    Yes, it does !
    TLFi says for "à raison" : En étant dans le vrai; sans se tromper.
    as opposed to "à tort" : Sans raison valable ou pour des raisons fallacieuses; de façon erronée
    and then, you have "à tort ou à raison" = when you are not sure of the validity of the point
    eg: les gens pensent, à tort ou à raison, que les membres de wordreference sont tous formidables :D

    Can you say "without mistaking" or something like that in English ? :confused:
     
  3. flippantfolly Junior Member

    uk
    you can't say "without mistaking". But that doest really make sense in the context anyway. The only thing that i can see makes sense is "quite rightly" or maybe "and one would be right to do so" or something. Would that comply to the french?
     
  4. geve

    geve Senior Member

    France, Paris
    France, French
    yes, this seems to me pretty close to the meaning of the French expression !
     

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