être mis en rapport

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by cmmc, Oct 28, 2008.

  1. cmmc Senior Member

    USA- English
    "Cette aporie se fait sentir particulièrement quand on se penche sur les éléments de sur récit qui peuvent être mis en rapport avec un texte législatif comme la Règle de Benoît…"

    Hi! This is from commentary comparing two 6th century texts. The definition I found on the site for "mettre en rapport" is "match up," but this seems to require something different.

    Here's an attempt:

    This impasse becomes especially apparent when one studies the elements of the account which can be placed alongside? compared with? a legislative text like the Rule of Benedict....

    I'd appreciate your suggestions!

    Thanks much!!
     
  2. gillyfr Senior Member

    Montreal, Canada
    English - England
    I'd go with "compared with".
     
  3. Madhu Mayi Junior Member

    France
    French
    Hi! " be related" might do. You're right "match' isn't appropriate here. I'm not sure about using "impasse" for "aporie". "impasse" is a dead end, but you know better what the text is about.
     
  4. cmmc Senior Member

    USA- English
    Thanks! I'm thinking that I should have posted the entire sentence, in case the end of the sentence changes anything...so here it is.


    "Cette aporie se fait sentir particulièrement quand on se penche sur les éléments de sur récit qui peuvent être mis en rapport avec un texte législatif comme la Règle de Benoît, à savoir les points de discipline monastique et d’observance.

    Should the last part read can be compared with a text like the Rule of Benedict, that is to say, the points of monastic discipline and observance?


     
  5. cmmc Senior Member

    USA- English
    Madhu, I didn't see your comment before I just posted my last. Here's the information I based my translation of aporie on:

    In the terminology of deconstruction, aporia is a final impasse or paradox--the site at which the text most obviously undermines its own rhetorical structure, dismantles, or deconstructs itself.

    Do you have a better suggestion? I could just say "aporia," but its not something I've ever heard in English before.
     
  6. Madhu Mayi Junior Member

    France
    French
    Hi cmmc! I've just checked "aporie". Your translation is correct. My apologies. As for what you suggested last it seems to be fine.
     
  7. gillyfr Senior Member

    Montreal, Canada
    English - England
    "à savoir" could be most closely translated into English by "to wit". On re-reading, I'd be more inclined to say, "by comparing them with a legislative text such as the Rule of Benedict, to wit...". If you use, "that is to say", you would need to restructure the phrase, because it sounds as if you mean the Rule of Benedict and not the elements of the account.
     
  8. Tresley

    Tresley Senior Member

    Yorkshire / United Kingdom
    British English
    Hi,

    I think that 'en rapport avec' can be translated as 'in keeping with' or 'in line with'.

    For 'aporie', 'scepticism' or even 'doubt(s)' might work.
     
  9. cmmc Senior Member

    USA- English
    Dear gillyfr,
    At this link, http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=358355 Aupick says
    that "to wit" is a very dated expression.

    What if I change the sentence to as follows?
    This impasse becomes especially apparent when one studies the elements of the account (i.e. the points of monastic discipline and observance) which can be connected with a legislative text like RB.
     
  10. gillyfr Senior Member

    Montreal, Canada
    English - England
    Peronally, I like "to wit". :) It has a certain academic flavour that would seem to fit nicely in this context.

    The change in sentence structure you propose, using "i.e" is what I was thinking of. But I would prefer to still say "compared with", because connection often implies correlation, and here the two texts are simply being compared.
     
  11. cmmc Senior Member

    USA- English
    What you say about "compared with" make sense!

    In this sentence do you advocate "to wit" over the i.e. phrase?
     
  12. gillyfr Senior Member

    Montreal, Canada
    English - England
    It really depends on the overall style of the text. When was it written? Does it sound generally academic? Is it literary? If not, are parallels drawn with today? Does it aim to simplify for the modern-day reader? The answers to these questions should help you to determine which phrase fits better.
     

Share This Page