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Καταδεχτικός/Συγκαταβατικός

Discussion in 'Ελληνικά (Greek)' started by Live2Learn, Oct 27, 2013.

  1. Live2Learn Junior Member

    English - USA
    These two words can have both a positive connotation in Greek (επιεικής, ήπιος) and a negative one (English 'condescending' or 'patronizing'). This can lead to a breakdown in communication if the translation from one language to the other is bad, e.g. in a recommendation letter a head teacher writes, "This teacher is condescending towards her students". This is intended to have the positive connotation of 'affable', but ends up having the negative connotation because the wrong translation is given for the context. My question is this: can anyone give me other words like this that can be easily misconstrued because of a difference in connotation between the words in Greek and English?

    Σας ευχαριστώ εκ των προτέρον.
     
  2. Eltheza

    Eltheza Senior Member

    Worcestershire, UK
    English - England (Midlands)
    Hi L2L!

    I think εμπάθεια can mean both 'empathy' and 'hatred' but possibly the context would make clear which was intended:confused:.
     
  3. Live2Learn Junior Member

    English - USA
    Eltheza, I've looked in a couple of dictionaries, including http://www.wordreference.com/gren/εμπάθεια. I could be wrong, but εμπάθεια doesn't seem to mean empathy at all. Its meanng is listed as hatred, malice, spite, prejudice against. Ενσυναίθηση (επίσημο) and κατανόηση, συμπάθεια (καθομιλουμένη) are given as translations of empathy (http://www.wordreference.com/engr/empathy). Maybe someone else in the forum can help out.
     
  4. Eltheza

    Eltheza Senior Member

    Worcestershire, UK
    English - England (Midlands)
  5. Live2Learn Junior Member

    English - USA
    Quite interesting, indeed! Thanks for sharing the link, Eltheza! :)
     
  6. Αγγελος Senior Member

    Greek
    From 1972 I remember a full-page picture of George McGovern captioned "Η Αμερική αναζητεί το Μεσσία της".
    It was meant to be laudatory (=her savior), but to most Americans it had a negative connotation (=a crowd-swaying demagogue).
     

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