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Сядь-ка.

Discussion in 'Русский (Russian)' started by gentilhom, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. gentilhom

    gentilhom Senior Member

    Girona Espagne
    français
    What does сядька mean ? I found this word in a Russian folkstale and according to the translation, it has something to do with sitting but I could not find the verb from which it is derived. Or is it a spelling mistake ?
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  2. Honeythunder New Member

    Russian
    It must be "сядь-ка". "Ка" is a postfix — a particle added to the verb in order to sort of make the request/order informal or casual. There is an equivalent of this postfix in German — "mal".
     
  3. learnerr Senior Member

    Russian
    If it's not a spelling mistake, then it may mean a human who often pronounces these words or who is often required to sit down. This word does not belong to the default Russian vocabulary, but is easily formed upon wish.
     
  4. gentilhom

    gentilhom Senior Member

    Girona Espagne
    français
    Thank everybody
     
  5. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    -ка is a particle, added to the verbs in Imperative, to soften request.
    It can be added also to the illocutionary partical ну: Ну-ка сядь. In this case it usually softer than without -ка (i.e. softer than А ну сядь!).
    -ка is also used with the 1st Person verb in Future Tense, to express intention: Схожу-ка я в кино.
     
  6. gentilhom

    gentilhom Senior Member

    Girona Espagne
    français
    Thank you, this is very helpful !

    BTW I was wondering whether it would be possible to use давай with сядь...
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  7. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    Sure, it is possible. However it will sound rude and even aggressive. More or less in order of increasing insistency and/or rudeness (always corrected for intonation and context):
    Садись-ка.
    Садись.
    Сядь-ка.
    Сядь.
    А ну сядь or Сядь давай (Давай сядь).
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  8. gentilhom

    gentilhom Senior Member

    Girona Espagne
    français
    I believe you but давайте познакомимся doesn't seem to be rude, does it?
     
  9. igusarov

    igusarov Senior Member

    Moscow, Russia
    Russian
    You are right, it doesn't. But you were asking about imperative form, and "познакомимся" is not imperative. If it was ("давай знакомься") then it would sound aggressive.
     
  10. gentilhom

    gentilhom Senior Member

    Girona Espagne
    français
    I didn't realize that Russian has no imperative form in the first person of the plural, unlike French.
     
  11. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    The particle давайте is used here to form so called Incentive Mood, a kind of Imperative, used to suggest a mutual action perfomed by me and you (politely to one person or to several persons). It is formed by use of postfix -те:
    споемте (давайте споем - я с вами)
    пройдемте (давайте пройдем)
    пройдемтесь (давайте пройдемся).
    It must be distinguished from the Imperative давайте or давай, like igusarov explained in the previous post.
    With most verbs this form sounds outdated (like познакомимтесь or поедемте), but with some verbs it is widely used as a stable saying (пройдемте is what a policeman would most likely say you to take you to the police station).

    Why? It has: сядьте.
     
  12. learnerr Senior Member

    Russian
    Maybe outdated (not at all for me, though, especially "поедемте", and "познакомимтесь" looks to me about only as outdated as the usage of the word "знакомиться" is), maybe neological. The pattern is here and very obvious, so making new words comes natural.
    It is "сядем", actually. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  13. igusarov

    igusarov Senior Member

    Moscow, Russia
    Russian
    Sorry to disappoint both of you... :) "сядьте" is second-person plural imperative, "сядем" is first-person plural simple future. :)
     
  14. learnerr Senior Member

    Russian
    But the second sometimes is used in the imperative sense, a bit like asseyons-nous is. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2013
  15. Maroseika Moderator

    Moscow
    Russian
    My bad... Yes, you are quite right, of course.
     

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